Community ChoicesPublic WorkshopMorgantown, June 6, 2012
Tonight’s Agenda Part 1: Regional  Vision Part 2: Background Part 3: Scenarios
Part 1: Regional VisionIdea GatheringUnderstanding Future GrowthCommunity ChoicesRating Vision Statements
Idea Gathering         &          Stakeholder   Meetings                        Interviews                 Goals & Vision ...
Goals & Vision         &           Understanding Statements                        Future Growth                  Principl...
Principles &                      TechnicalRegional Vision                    Findings              Transportation and    ...
Reviewing Ideas with the Regional Vision Group
Principles about where and how    to address future growth
Conceptual Growth Framework Insert map here. Will not go into details at this point
Community Choices: Purpose1. To present Regional Vision and measure   support for its vision statements and   principles2....
Rating Vision StatementsVision statements are the broadest expressionof a community visionGoals express a desired outcome ...
1       2   3   4       5  No                  StronglySupport               Support
Vision Statements: GrowingManaged growth that is efficient and attractive,supported by appropriate infrastructure, andthat...
Vision Statements: MovingA balanced, safe and attractive transportationsystem will reduce congestion, improveconnectivity ...
Vision Statements: LivingJob and income growth, improved communityservices, support for the arts, accessible andconnected ...
Vision Statements: CompetingA regional approach to economic developmentand infrastructure investments will make theregion ...
Vision Statements: CollaboratingLeadership that embraces continued communityengagement and stronger collaboration amongmun...
Part 2: BackgroundConceptual Framework MapRating PrinciplesPreliminary Economic FindingsPreliminary Transportation Findings
Conceptual Framework MapMichael Insert final version
Conceptual Framework MapA visual representation of the VisionPreliminarily based on:1. Results of Understanding Future Gro...
Patterns we found in the Understanding Future Growth Workshop:                 Redevelopment at higher intensitiesExamples...
Patterns we found in the Understanding Future Growth Workshop:                         Infill DevelopmentExamples:        ...
Patterns we found in the Understanding Future Growth Workshop:           Greenfield development is limited and clusteredEx...
Patterns we found in the Understanding Future Growth Workshop:             Very limited development in outlying areasExamp...
Conceptual Framework MapMichael Insert final version
Conceptual Framework MapMichael Insert final version
ConceptsPreserve Open – Areas that are permanently protected from development (parkland)Reserve Open – Areas of steep slop...
Conceptual Framework MapA visual representation of the VisionWill be refined based on:1. Results of Community Choices2. Ma...
Conceptual Framework MapA visual representation of the Vision• Represents the intended approach to growth  in the region.•...
Rating PrinciplesPrinciples reflect community values, in this caserelated to the character of the physicalenvironment in t...
Rating Principles1. Infill development and redevelopment ofunderutilized and/or deteriorating sites takespriority over dev...
Principles2. Expansion of the urban area will occur in acontiguous pattern that favors areas alreadyserved by existing inf...
Principles3. Future growth in rural areas will conserveopen space, preserve sensitive natural features,and respect signifi...
Principles4. Quality design is emphasized for all uses tocreate an attractive, distinctive public (streets,sidewalks, park...
Principles5. Development that integrates mixed uses(residential, commercial, institutional, civic etc.)and connects with t...
Principles6. A broad range of housing types, price levelsand ownership options will provide desirableliving options for a ...
Principles7. Residential development will support theformation of complete neighborhoods withdiverse housing options, pede...
Principles8. Places will be better connected to improvethe function of the street network and createmore opportunities to ...
Principles9. Parks, open space, and recreational areas areincorporated as part of future development.         1       2   ...
Principles10. Environmentally sensitive and sustainablepractices will be encouraged in futuredevelopments.         1      ...
Preliminary Economic Findings
PART 1. Baseline Economic Conditions          & Opportunities                 Randall Gross / Development Economics
Major Employers   West Virginia University   Hospitals   Mylan Pharmaceuticals   Swanson Plating Company   Mining & C...
Economic Trends
Note: Mining has made a comeback since 2006.
Key Indicators Metro Labor Force: 70,000 Unemployment 5%   – Well below state and national averages   – 9th lowest among...
Economic Clusters and Concentrations   Education   Health Care Cluster      Government/R&D      Pharmaceuticals      Infor...
Business Stakeholder InputPrimary Advantages of Area Location   Location/Market Access   Available Bldg / Site   Near O...
Key Planning & Development Issues   Traffic Congestion & Road Safety   Appearance   Available Infrastructure   Lack of...
Competitive Advantages  West Virginia University  Federal Laboratories and Innovation Base  Skilled Professional Base (...
Comparable Communities  Asheville, North Carolina  Arts, mountain-based tourism; professional/tech services  Blacksburg,...
PART 2. Land Use Projections
Purpose, Methodology and Assumptions• Purpose:    •Inform Land Use Planning and Policy    •Provide Basis for Long-Range Tr...
Definition of Sub-Areas
•How was Growth Apportioned by Sub-Area?   •Market-Based Trend      •Past trends      •Occupancy & vacancy patterns      •...
Market Considerations•Housing     •Cheat Lake Area amenities have attracted move-ups     •Desirable historic neighborhoods...
Countywide Land Use Projections– general findings, impact of policies•Housing     •Demand for almost 17,200 more housing u...
Sub-Area Projections
Issues and Questions for                Consideration•How to reduce effective development costs in targeted areas•How to e...
Preliminary Transportation Findings
Transportation System•Walking•Automobile•Bicycling•Bus•PRT
Roadways Characteristics• Nearly 17% of roadway “arterials” are at, or  over capacity with numerous “bottlenecks” in  the ...
Roadway Challenges• Very difficult to widen existing or construct new  roads due to limited right-of-way availability and ...
Automobile Traffic Characteristics• Peak travel times and traffic operations highly  influenced by WVU schedule• Travel pa...
Primary Public Transit Service Providers• Mountain Line Transit Authority   – Focus on the urban core with reach into the ...
Transit Characteristics• Good transit service coverage in key populated  areas• Frequency of service is deficient in most ...
Pedestrian System Characteristics• Primarily sidewalks and multi-use trails• Grade/topography a major concern• Sidewalk co...
Pedestrian Safety• 1998 through 2008  – 226 reported pedestrian injuries  – Consistently 20 to 25 pedestrian injuries per ...
Pedestrian Demand• Local demographics lead to:  – Walking more prevalent in Morgantown than    anywhere else in WV  – Sign...
Bicycling Characteristics• On-street travel:  – Narrow lanes and steep grades can make    bicycling difficult on many road...
Bicycling Characteristics• Trails   – Excellent opportunities for cycling (recreational     and commuting) on trails   – N...
Bicycling Characteristics• Parking  – Numerous racks in City and WVU Campus  – Parking rings already added to several down...
Part 3: ScenariosScenario #1Scenario #2Scenario #3Ranking Scenarios
Summary PointsThe region will continue to growThere are natural and man made challenges totransportation and mobilityWe he...
HOW should that growth occur?
Three Scenarios1. The majority of future development will be in   the form of infill and redevelopment within   the primar...
Scenario #11. The majority of future development will be in   the form of infill and redevelopment within   the primary ur...
DefinitionsRedevelopment means erecting new buildings inthe place of old onesInfill is building to occupy an empty spacebe...
ImplicationsDensities will increaseMay require regulation changes in some areasMay need upgrading of the serviceinfrastruc...
Rating Scenario #1The majority of future development will be inthe form of infill and redevelopment within theprimary urba...
Scenario #22. The majority of future development will be in   the form of new development contiguous to   the primary urba...
ImplicationsDevelopment is directed toward areas adjacent toones already developedMay require additional and or new regula...
Rating Scenario #22. The majority of future development will be in   the form of new development contiguous to   the prima...
Scenario #33. The majority of future development will   continue the growth patterns we have seen   in the past 10 years.
ImplicationsDevelopment can occur anywhere there is buildablelandDevelopment patterns are harder to predictLarger investme...
Rating Scenario #33. The majority of future development will   continue the growth patterns we have seen   in the past 10 ...
Ranking the Scenarios1. Please rank the three scenarios relative to   each other where rank 1 is most preferred   and rank...
Thank you!
Community choicespresentation
Community choicespresentation
Community choicespresentation
Community choicespresentation
Community choicespresentation
Community choicespresentation
Community choicespresentation
Community choicespresentation
Community choicespresentation
Community choicespresentation
Community choicespresentation
Community choicespresentation
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Community choicespresentation

  1. 1. Community ChoicesPublic WorkshopMorgantown, June 6, 2012
  2. 2. Tonight’s Agenda Part 1: Regional Vision Part 2: Background Part 3: Scenarios
  3. 3. Part 1: Regional VisionIdea GatheringUnderstanding Future GrowthCommunity ChoicesRating Vision Statements
  4. 4. Idea Gathering & Stakeholder Meetings Interviews Goals & Vision Statements
  5. 5. Goals & Vision & Understanding Statements Future Growth Principles & Regional Vision
  6. 6. Principles & TechnicalRegional Vision Findings Transportation and Comprehensive Plans
  7. 7. Reviewing Ideas with the Regional Vision Group
  8. 8. Principles about where and how to address future growth
  9. 9. Conceptual Growth Framework Insert map here. Will not go into details at this point
  10. 10. Community Choices: Purpose1. To present Regional Vision and measure support for its vision statements and principles2. To obtain more specific public input in support of the Comprehensive and Transportation Plans
  11. 11. Rating Vision StatementsVision statements are the broadest expressionof a community visionGoals express a desired outcome for each of theelements of a plan. They must reflect and beconsistent with the vision statements but alsoinclude technical considerations as well as theinput of planning or technical advisorycommittees
  12. 12. 1 2 3 4 5 No StronglySupport Support
  13. 13. Vision Statements: GrowingManaged growth that is efficient and attractive,supported by appropriate infrastructure, andthat balances land consumption withredevelopment while protecting and preservingopen space, local agriculture, energy resourcesand the environment. 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  14. 14. Vision Statements: MovingA balanced, safe and attractive transportationsystem will reduce congestion, improveconnectivity and support and direct futuregrowth integrating private vehicles, publictransportation, biking, and walking. 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  15. 15. Vision Statements: LivingJob and income growth, improved communityservices, support for the arts, accessible andconnected parks and recreational facilities, goodschools, desirable and diverse housing, and safeneighborhoods that have access to local shopsand markets. 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  16. 16. Vision Statements: CompetingA regional approach to economic developmentand infrastructure investments will make theregion competitive and capable of attracting andsupporting existing and new businesses. 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  17. 17. Vision Statements: CollaboratingLeadership that embraces continued communityengagement and stronger collaboration amongmunicipalities, the county, the State and WVUwill enable the sharing of resources andsuccessful regional growth. 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  18. 18. Part 2: BackgroundConceptual Framework MapRating PrinciplesPreliminary Economic FindingsPreliminary Transportation Findings
  19. 19. Conceptual Framework MapMichael Insert final version
  20. 20. Conceptual Framework MapA visual representation of the VisionPreliminarily based on:1. Results of Understanding Future Growth workshop2. Work with Comprehensive Plan Committees
  21. 21. Patterns we found in the Understanding Future Growth Workshop: Redevelopment at higher intensitiesExamples: Group Group 5 2 • All of the groups placed at least half of their chips on areas with existing development • Many chips were stacked on specific sites that participants felt had redevelopment potential, indicating that development should occur at higher intensities.
  22. 22. Patterns we found in the Understanding Future Growth Workshop: Infill DevelopmentExamples: Group Group 4 2 • Most of the groups placed development in undeveloped areas near existing development. • This infill pattern of development would plug holes in the urban fabric, placing development in areas already served by existing infrastructure, and allowing the urban area to expand in a contiguous pattern.
  23. 23. Patterns we found in the Understanding Future Growth Workshop: Greenfield development is limited and clusteredExamples: Group Group 3 2 • Groups understood the difficulty in limiting all “greenfield” development. • Development happening in currently undeveloped areas should be both near existing development and/or clustered to “minimize sprawl” and “preserve open space” rather than occur in a haphazard “leap-frog” pattern.
  24. 24. Patterns we found in the Understanding Future Growth Workshop: Very limited development in outlying areasExamples: Group Group Group 4 3 2 • Groups allocated very limited growth for the surrounding region. • Some identified areas south, along I-79 as suitable for some development, while fewer placed development in the western part of the county.
  25. 25. Conceptual Framework MapMichael Insert final version
  26. 26. Conceptual Framework MapMichael Insert final version
  27. 27. ConceptsPreserve Open – Areas that are permanently protected from development (parkland)Reserve Open – Areas of steep slopes that are subject to development but should beprotected.Restricted (floodplain) – Areas that are subject to development, but where development isrestricted due to a high risk of flooding.Priority Growth – Areas where development should be encouraged. Includes growth in newareas and redevelopment within existing areas. Development should be consistent with thePrinciples (enhance the community’s vitality, provide for a greater mix of uses, improvemobility, expand housing choices, and attractive)Infill and Redevelopment – Existing developed areas where additional growth, consistentwith the Principles is generally appropriate, but not a strategic priority.Controlled Growth – Developing areas, or currently undeveloped land where more growthis likely due to proximity to existing thoroughfares, infrastructure and adjacency to recentdevelopment. Growth in these areas generally expands the footprint of the urban area andshould be controlled to minimize negative impacts.Limited Growth – All other areas of that are subject to development, but where increasedintensity is generally not desired. These areas include both existing open space and existingdevelopment.
  28. 28. Conceptual Framework MapA visual representation of the VisionWill be refined based on:1. Results of Community Choices2. Market analysis and forecasts
  29. 29. Conceptual Framework MapA visual representation of the Vision• Represents the intended approach to growth in the region.• Policy recommendations of the Comprehensive Plans and Long Range Transportation Plan will aim to make this reality.
  30. 30. Rating PrinciplesPrinciples reflect community values, in this caserelated to the character of the physicalenvironment in the region. The principlesdescribe the community’s intent about “how”(character attributes) and “where” (conceptuallocation) land development should occur.
  31. 31. Rating Principles1. Infill development and redevelopment ofunderutilized and/or deteriorating sites takespriority over development in remote greenfieldlocations. 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  32. 32. Principles2. Expansion of the urban area will occur in acontiguous pattern that favors areas alreadyserved by existing infrastructure. 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  33. 33. Principles3. Future growth in rural areas will conserveopen space, preserve sensitive natural features,and respect significant views 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  34. 34. Principles4. Quality design is emphasized for all uses tocreate an attractive, distinctive public (streets,sidewalks, parks, and street trees, etc.) andprivate (building faces, lawns and landscaping,parking lots and driveways, etc.) realm and topromote positive perceptions of the region 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  35. 35. Principles5. Development that integrates mixed uses(residential, commercial, institutional, civic etc.)and connects with the existing urban fabric willbe encouraged to enhance the region’s vitality. 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  36. 36. Principles6. A broad range of housing types, price levelsand ownership options will provide desirableliving options for a diverse population 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  37. 37. Principles7. Residential development will support theformation of complete neighborhoods withdiverse housing options, pedestrian-scale streets,integrated public spaces, connection to adjacentneighborhoods, access to transportationalternatives and easy access to basic retail needs 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  38. 38. Principles8. Places will be better connected to improvethe function of the street network and createmore opportunities to walk, bike and accesspublic transportation throughout the region 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  39. 39. Principles9. Parks, open space, and recreational areas areincorporated as part of future development. 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  40. 40. Principles10. Environmentally sensitive and sustainablepractices will be encouraged in futuredevelopments. 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  41. 41. Preliminary Economic Findings
  42. 42. PART 1. Baseline Economic Conditions & Opportunities Randall Gross / Development Economics
  43. 43. Major Employers West Virginia University Hospitals Mylan Pharmaceuticals Swanson Plating Company Mining & Construction Government – Local Schools – Federal labs: US DOE, DOA, CDC Other: – Teletech Customer Care Management (telemarketing)-800 – Waterfront Place Hotel – United Biosource Corporation (data processing) – Gabriel Bros (warehouse/corp office) – Urgent Care, Washington Group, WV Choice, Allegheny Power
  44. 44. Economic Trends
  45. 45. Note: Mining has made a comeback since 2006.
  46. 46. Key Indicators Metro Labor Force: 70,000 Unemployment 5% – Well below state and national averages – 9th lowest among metro areas in the South Housing Prices – Remained stable despite national dip Core Economic Stability: – College Town: Employment in WVU/education & health care – Large government R&D facilities – Dominance of large/growing pharmaceutical company – Re-birth of mining industry
  47. 47. Economic Clusters and Concentrations Education Health Care Cluster Government/R&D Pharmaceuticals Information Technology Scientific Consulting Energy /Resources Cluster Government/R&D Mining & Utilities Engineering Services Tech Consulting IT Cluster Computers, marketing, management services Tourism Cluster Recreation services, accommodation, foodservice
  48. 48. Business Stakeholder InputPrimary Advantages of Area Location Location/Market Access Available Bldg / Site Near Owner’s HomePrimary Disadvantages of Area Location High real estate costs High taxesEmployment Issues Dearth of skilled workers with higher degrees  Lack of available service workers – lack of affordable housing
  49. 49. Key Planning & Development Issues Traffic Congestion & Road Safety Appearance Available Infrastructure Lack of developable land Cost of development ParkingQuality of Life Issues Air Quality (25%) NONE (25%) Public Services (16%)Business Needs Address road & infrastructure issues Address tax structure to improve business climate (esp B&0) Improve physical appearance – better enforcement, licensing
  50. 50. Competitive Advantages West Virginia University Federal Laboratories and Innovation Base Skilled Professional Base (catching up) Regional Health Care Center Proximity to Pittsburgh and Washington, DC Access to Natural Resources & Rec. Amenities Historic Downtown & Riverfront Amenities
  51. 51. Comparable Communities Asheville, North Carolina Arts, mountain-based tourism; professional/tech services Blacksburg, Virginia Engineering services, R&D, manufacturing Ithaca, New York Manufacturing, high-tech, tourism State College, Pennsylvania Information/intelligence R&D
  52. 52. PART 2. Land Use Projections
  53. 53. Purpose, Methodology and Assumptions• Purpose: •Inform Land Use Planning and Policy •Provide Basis for Long-Range Transportation Forecasting and Planning•Basis for Projections •WVU Monongalia County Population Projections through 2040 •Workforce West Virginia WIA Employment Projections through 2020•Overall Methodology •Extrapolated Demographic Forecasts from State Sources •Examine Economic Trends and Market Conditions •Develop County-wide Land Use Forecasts •Allocate Land Use Demand by Sub-Area (using Transportation Analysis Zones) •Re-Allocate Land Use Based on Community Principles•Caveats •Absence of inventories, market trend data, and long-term demographics
  54. 54. Definition of Sub-Areas
  55. 55. •How was Growth Apportioned by Sub-Area? •Market-Based Trend •Past trends •Occupancy & vacancy patterns •Market conditions & forecasts (i.e., expenditure potentials) •Location, access and competitive features •Policy-Based on Community Principles, if Applied •Incentives and regulation •Encourage infill and densification in existing developed areas •Discourage “sprawl” in outlying & under-serviced areas •Promote mixed-use development in key corridors and nodes •Focus on mix of jobs and housing
  56. 56. Market Considerations•Housing •Cheat Lake Area amenities have attracted move-ups •Desirable historic neighborhoods / South Park, Suncrest •Strong rentals, stable for-sale market •Cost of land & development can be higher due to physical constraints •Key Market Drivers •Hospitals and Mylan employees, young professionals & students, university faculty, federal employees•Retail •Shift underway from mall formats to town center/boxes •Downtown desirable and successful, but limited space for expansion •Lack of east-west connector impacts on retail market efficiency•Industrial •Land available in industrial parks but limited building space •Oil/gas driving current demand•Office •University and hospitals drive demand •Few office “parks,” but performing well
  57. 57. Countywide Land Use Projections– general findings, impact of policies•Housing •Demand for almost 17,200 more housing units by 2037 •Increase of 42.9% in 25 years (1.6% per year) •There are 11,700 more housing units in 2012 than in 1990 •Increase of 37.0% in 22 years (1.7% per year)•Retail •Demand for 2.8 million square feet of retail space by 2037 •Increase of 47.1% in 25 years (1.9% per year) •Translates into 4,115 more retail & restaurant jobs •There are about 3,200 more retail & restaurant jobs in 2012 than in 1998 •Increase of 37.7% in 14 years (2.7% per year)
  58. 58. Sub-Area Projections
  59. 59. Issues and Questions for Consideration•How to reduce effective development costs in targeted areas•How to enhance or create “amenity value” as a spur for infilland redevelopment in urbanized areas•How to use transportation as an incentive for development•How to reduce dependency on several large employers•How to encourage a balanced approach to jobs and housing•How to create the appropriate mix of “carrots” and “sticks” tobalance development
  60. 60. Preliminary Transportation Findings
  61. 61. Transportation System•Walking•Automobile•Bicycling•Bus•PRT
  62. 62. Roadways Characteristics• Nearly 17% of roadway “arterials” are at, or over capacity with numerous “bottlenecks” in the system• Many “substandard” roadways – Steep grades – Sharp turns/curves – Narrow lane widths – Narrow shoulder widths
  63. 63. Roadway Challenges• Very difficult to widen existing or construct new roads due to limited right-of-way availability and the area’s topography• Uncontrolled development patterns and lack of improvements to transportation infrastructure or access control over the years have lead to many capacity/safety problems• Lack of local consensus has stymied past attempts to construct roadway/highway improvements
  64. 64. Automobile Traffic Characteristics• Peak travel times and traffic operations highly influenced by WVU schedule• Travel patterns influenced by parking availability and locations
  65. 65. Primary Public Transit Service Providers• Mountain Line Transit Authority – Focus on the urban core with reach into the County – Major service expansions are planned but not funded• WVU – Focus on shuttle service connecting campuses – Operates PRT • Excellent reliability record • Undergoing maintenance and technology upgrades • No plans/funding for expansion of system
  66. 66. Transit Characteristics• Good transit service coverage in key populated areas• Frequency of service is deficient in most areas• Hours of day of service also deficient in most areas• Lacks consistent stop locations with quality amenities and good pedestrian environments
  67. 67. Pedestrian System Characteristics• Primarily sidewalks and multi-use trails• Grade/topography a major concern• Sidewalk coverage/connectivity deficient in most areas• Narrow sidewalks adjacent to high speed traffic• Lack of crosswalks• Many existing sidewalks are substandard with utility poles and other impediments blocking the pathway
  68. 68. Pedestrian Safety• 1998 through 2008 – 226 reported pedestrian injuries – Consistently 20 to 25 pedestrian injuries per year Leading pedestrian accident locations Spruce & Walnut (9) University/Beechurst/Fayette (5) High & Willey (8) Beechurst & Campus (5) S. University & Pleasant (8) Chestnut Ridge/Van Voorhis (5) University & College (8) High & Walnut (4) N. Willey & Prospect (7) High & Fayette (4) Spruce & Pleasant (5) University & Prospect (4) West Virginia University Injury Control Research Center January 1998 – June 2008
  69. 69. Pedestrian Demand• Local demographics lead to: – Walking more prevalent in Morgantown than anywhere else in WV – Significant demand for walking/running for exercise – University connections to off-campus residential areas especially important
  70. 70. Bicycling Characteristics• On-street travel: – Narrow lanes and steep grades can make bicycling difficult on many roadways – Few streets with paved shoulders – No on-street bike lanes exist – Steep side slopes and narrow rights-of-way make bike lane improvements difficult – “Bikeable” routes exist (see Morgantown Bicycle Board’s “Commuter Map”)
  71. 71. Bicycling Characteristics• Trails – Excellent opportunities for cycling (recreational and commuting) on trails – Nearly 10-miles of paved trails • Caperton Trail • Decker’s Creek Trail – Many more miles of nature surface trails at City and County parks
  72. 72. Bicycling Characteristics• Parking – Numerous racks in City and WVU Campus – Parking rings already added to several downtown parking meters with possibly more in the future
  73. 73. Part 3: ScenariosScenario #1Scenario #2Scenario #3Ranking Scenarios
  74. 74. Summary PointsThe region will continue to growThere are natural and man made challenges totransportation and mobilityWe heard about choices on WHERE toaccommodate future growth
  75. 75. HOW should that growth occur?
  76. 76. Three Scenarios1. The majority of future development will be in the form of infill and redevelopment within the primary urban area.2. The majority of future development will be in the form of new development contiguous to the primary urban area.3. The majority of future development will continue the growth patterns we have seen in the past 10 years.
  77. 77. Scenario #11. The majority of future development will be in the form of infill and redevelopment within the primary urban area.
  78. 78. DefinitionsRedevelopment means erecting new buildings inthe place of old onesInfill is building to occupy an empty spacebetween buildings, the empty portion of ablock, or an empty block or areaReuse is changing the way an existing building isused
  79. 79. ImplicationsDensities will increaseMay require regulation changes in some areasMay need upgrading of the serviceinfrastructureRequires rethinking of transportation priorities
  80. 80. Rating Scenario #1The majority of future development will be inthe form of infill and redevelopment within theprimary urban area. 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  81. 81. Scenario #22. The majority of future development will be in the form of new development contiguous to the primary urban area.
  82. 82. ImplicationsDevelopment is directed toward areas adjacent toones already developedMay require additional and or new regulationsoutside of the two jurisdictions and in the countyRequires investment in new service infrastructureMay require limited extension of the road network
  83. 83. Rating Scenario #22. The majority of future development will be in the form of new development contiguous to the primary urban area. 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  84. 84. Scenario #33. The majority of future development will continue the growth patterns we have seen in the past 10 years.
  85. 85. ImplicationsDevelopment can occur anywhere there is buildablelandDevelopment patterns are harder to predictLarger investments in service infrastructure androadsNo needs to change regulations
  86. 86. Rating Scenario #33. The majority of future development will continue the growth patterns we have seen in the past 10 years. 1 2 3 4 5 No Strongly Support Support
  87. 87. Ranking the Scenarios1. Please rank the three scenarios relative to each other where rank 1 is most preferred and rank 3 is least preferred.2. After considering the possible scenarios, what do you think is the best outcome for the future of this region?
  88. 88. Thank you!

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