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Lifecycle admissions overview

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Lifecycle admissions overview

  1. 1. New Students of 2015 Update A future approach to Admissions: The time is Now Board of Trustees February 25, 2017 Jim Goecker Vice President of Enrollment Management
  2. 2. May 2013 BOT meeting: Enrollment Management Update – Next Year 3
  3. 3. Presentation to the Student Affairs and Enrollment Committee, September, 2015: Admissions Framework 4
  4. 4. Questions posed at September 2015 BOT meeting (How a class is formed: “What’s Next? – An Opportunity!) 5
  5. 5. Historic approach Originally, virtually all criteria focused on academic measures • test scores • grades in required mathematics and science courses • rank in class • recommendation Moved to enrollment management model • intended major • gender, ethnic and racial mix • financial considerations •Advisement •Freshman Orientation •Test Scores •Academic data •Intended major •Mainly concerned with 11-12 grade Admissions Student Experience 6
  6. 6. Two students, seemingly identical 650 MA 600 CR Top 10 % Good recommendations Family income $125,000+ Interviews well “is a nice kid” Intends to study ME 650 MA 600 CR Top 10 % Good recommendations Family income $125,000+ Interviews well “is a nice kid” Intends to study ME 7
  7. 7. One fails, the other succeeds 650 MA 600 CR Top 10 % Good recommendations Family income $125,000+ Interviews well “is a nice kid” Intends to study ME GRADUATES 650 MA 600 CR Top 10 % Good recommendations Family income $125,000+ Interviews well “is a nice kid” Intends to study ME FAILS 8
  8. 8. Fundamental question: 650 MA 600 CR Top 10 % Good recommendations Family income $125,000+ Interviews well “is a nice kid” Intends to study ME GRADUATES 650 MA 600 CR Top 10 % Good recommendations Family income $125,000+ Interviews well “is a nice kid” Intends to study ME FAILS WHY? 9
  9. 9. Other questions • When do you take a risk in admission? • What is the decision based on? • Are there other factors as important as academic measures that contribute to success? 10
  10. 10. College Board two years ago presented a framework for their future work An example of a non-cognitive measurement tool: Adversity Index – placing a student in the context of what he or she has faced on their path to success. Scores in Context – comparing test scores and student performance in the context of others with similar opportunity. Academic Curricular Index – comparing the rigor of the student’s level of preparation relative to the opportunities available. 2 yr. to 4 yr. transfer facilitation – investigating additional sources of data that can assist colleges in identifying and evaluating students who have demonstrated post-secondary potential via community college enrollment. 11
  11. 11. Change is occurring: Environmental Context Dashboard 12
  12. 12. Grit, persistence, maturity, locus of control, … • The measurement of non-academic or non- cognitive attributes are being viewed as the next evolution in admission. • Rose-Hulman has been a part of this evolution with the use of the Locus of Control Inventory and Curiosity Index. 13
  13. 13. A revision of our understanding of admissions Lifecycle Admissions • Admission should not be solely based on a student’s ability to be academically successful at Rose-Hulman. • We should also consider other aspects of life and the student’s talents in those areas as well. • Personality • Attitude • View of world • Persistence • We should better understand those attributes that lead students to a life of fulfillment and success. • We are admitting individuals whose personality, in the long run, will be as much or more important to their future success as the academic preparation we offer. • Such traits should be measureable. 14
  14. 14. Remember this? 15 •Advisement •Freshman Orientation •Test Scores •Academic data •Intended major •Mainly concerned with 11-12 grade. Admissions Student Experience
  15. 15. The vision for the future: Lifecycle Admissions with a formal, measurable, iterative cycle of information to improve all parts of the cycle. • Success •What was taught •What was learned •Happiness •Success •What was taught •What was learned •Happiness •Advisement •Curriculum •Extra-curricular •Maturity •Life skills •Graduation •Employment •Identify sooner •Non-cognitive •Test Scores •Academic Data •Contextual •Demographic •Compatibility Admissions Student Experience Career Personal Life 16
  16. 16. Work to do 17 • Input from alumni and faculty • Charge to the Admissions and Standing Committee to define the attributes of the ideal student. • Great Debate data is rich with feedback on this topic. • Additional surveys of alumni at specific points in their career. • “Clean Slate” committee work and results. • Identify tool(s) that will provide measureable data. • Continuing to work with a number of potential partners. • Also looking at stand alone products. • Identify a structure for long term development and implementation. • Long term commitment. • Will grow beyond original set of data as process evolves. What else? • Grow the applicant pool. • Make sure the process is not so onerous as to deter application. • Make Lifecycle Admissions our norm rather than a tool to make “tweener” decisions. • “Hunting rather than fishing.”

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