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Places and Spaces for Health and Wellbeing, 19th May 2015, Glasgow

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Places and Spaces for Health and Wellbeing, 19th May 2015, Glasgow

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Places and Spaces for Health and Wellbeing, 19th May 2015, Glasgow

  1. 1. Places and Spaces for Health and Wellbeing Tuesday 19th May 2015 Saracen House, Glasgow
  2. 2. David Thompson DPT Urban Design
  3. 3. Rory Mitchell NHS Health Scotland
  4. 4. Marguerite Hunter Blair Play Scotland
  5. 5. Marguerite Hunter Blair Chief Executive The role and impact of outdoor spaces for Play 19 May 2015
  6. 6. Play Scotland works to deliver the child’s right to play in Scotland © Play Scotland
  7. 7. The Key Characteristics of Play © Play Scotland (UNCRC General Comment 2013)
  8. 8. Play Scotland Right to Play Risk Resilience Research Parents Providers Playworkers Training Lobbying Social Media Children and Young Peoples Act UK Play Safety Forum, HSE UK Childrens Play Policy Forum Scotland’s Play Strategy Early Years Context UNCRC General Comment 17 Playwork People in Scotland Youthwork Strategy Parenting Strategy
  9. 9. • Half of children aged between 5 and 10 years never play out on their streets • Half of parents think it is unsafe for children to play out • 15 year olds in Scotland showing sign of heart disease • 10 year olds prefer to engage with their friends through their phones rather than face to face © Play Scotland Did you know ...
  10. 10. •© Play Scotland
  11. 11. Active Scotland Outcomes
  12. 12. Our Key Stakeholders © Play Scotland Play Generates a Culture of Childhood (UNCRC General Comment 2013) © Play Scotland
  13. 13. Importance of Place
  14. 14. “Children need wilder places to play where they can take risks” RoSPA
  15. 15. “It’s not safe to go out on our own because we live next to a main road” Gary, aged 12 “If we had a Play Ranger they would make sure we’re safe” Kai, aged 8 “I would like to climb trees, build dens and have fun” Gary, aged 12
  16. 16. The Competent Child Needs Risk • “The ideal parent wants strong, resilient, bright eyed, fearless children” (Tom Hodgekinson) • “The introduction of risk might form part of play opportunities and activity” (HSE High level statement) © Play Scotland
  17. 17. The anti-poverty agenda in Wales recognises that children can have a poverty of experience, opportunity and aspiration, and that this kind of poverty can affect children from all social, cultural and economic backgrounds
  18. 18. © Play Scotland Active Achieving Inclusive © Play Scotland Children and Young People ACT 2014
  19. 19. Margaret Layden ng homes
  20. 20. Cllr Yvonne Kucuk Glasgow City Council
  21. 21. Places and Spaces for Health and Wellbeing Tuesday 19th May 2015 Saracen House, Glasgow
  22. 22. Petra Biberbach PAS
  23. 23. Petra Biberbach PAS | Chief Executive Placemaking for wellbeing and mental health Places & Spaces for Health & Wellbeing Conference Saracen House, Glasgow 19 May 2015
  24. 24. The biology is very clear: chaotic, difficult circumstances lead to an increased risk of physical and mental ill health So lets not spend a fortune trying to find drugs to fix that; lets change the chaotic and difficult circumstances! Sir Harry Burns (Former Chief Medical Officer) Wellness is created and lived every day through peoples’ ability to care for themselves … being able to take decisions, and having a sense of control. Those who identify their lives and environments as comprehensible, manageable and meaningful develop strong coping mechanisms … those who do not are liable to experience chronic stress. People with control over their lives will be less stressed… low levels of control point to a risk of ill health or even death brought on by hopelessness. The need for engaged, empowered, inclusive, participative approaches to placemaking
  25. 25. In 2014 PAS was nominated and received an award from Action in Mind provides a range of services to promote good mental health and support those who need their services PAS supports a planning system – a key public service – that is open and accessible to all
  26. 26. Spatial Planning Community Empowerment Community Planning
  27. 27. Spatial Planning Community Empowerment Community Planning PILLARS OF REFORM Place People Partnership/participation Performance/outcomes Prevention
  28. 28. Spatial Planning Community Empowerment Community Planning participative / collaborative approaches to place making
  29. 29. Spatial Planning Community Empowerment Community Planning
  30. 30. PAS is an independent impartial organisation that helps people in Scotland to understand and engage with the places they live in so that everyone has the power to create positive communities for the future. Volunteer led - PAS services are delivered by a combination of associates, staff and a large volunteer network of more than 400 built environment professionals. Volunteering is at the heart of what we do.
  31. 31. Advice Service PAS is the trusted body for anyone looking to understand the planning process and the places around them. We encourage active participation in planning and raise awareness in order to create positive change. Training PAS promotes education for all in the planning process, to encourage community engagement in creating positive places. With over 20 years of experience, the expertise of our staff and volunteers inspires and empowers people across Scotland. Influencing Place PAS inspires individuals to be aware of the planning process and their role within it, while raising civic awareness of the positive effect good planning can create for all. Education and Events PAS believes education and participation are key to enabling our communities to engage with the built places around them, and we support that process in schools and communities.
  32. 32. Youth engagement Seldom heard communities SP=EED™ Community led initiatives Charretteplus INCLUSIVE PLACEMAKING: Bringing people into the decision making process in meaningful ways
  33. 33. IMBY In My Back Yard INCLUSIVE PLACEMAKING: Youth Engagement Bringing young people into the decision making process in meaningful ways
  34. 34. IMBY In My Back Yard YEP! Youth Engagement in Planning INCLUSIVE PLACEMAKING: Youth Engagement Bringing young people into the decision making process in meaningful ways
  35. 35. IMBY In My Back Yard YEP! Youth Engagement in Planning Young Placemakers INCLUSIVE PLACEMAKING: Youth Engagement Bringing young people into the decision making process in meaningful ways
  36. 36. IMBY In My Back Yard YEP! Youth Engagement in Planning Young Placemakers European Youth Exchanges INCLUSIVE PLACEMAKING: Youth Engagement Bringing young people into the decision making process in meaningful ways
  37. 37. IMBY In My Back Yard YEP! Youth Engagement in Planning Young Placemakers European Youth Exchanges INCLUSIVE PLACEMAKING: Youth Engagement Bringing young people into the decision making process in meaningful ways Place Work Folk
  38. 38. Meaningfully engaging seldom heard communities in decision making processes INCLUSIVE PLACEMAKING: Gypsy / travellers
  39. 39. Meaningfully engaging communities in decision making processes INCLUSIVE PLACEMAKING: SP=EED
  40. 40. Meaningfully engaging communities in decision making processes INCLUSIVE PLACEMAKING: Community led Isle of Rum
  41. 41. Meaningfully engaging communities in decision making processes INCLUSIVE PLACEMAKING: Charretteplus Levenmouth
  42. 42. Meaningfully engaging communities in decision making processes INCLUSIVE PLACEMAKING: Charretteplus Dunblane
  43. 43. Meaningfully engaging communities in decision making processes INCLUSIVE PLACEMAKING: Charretteplus Dunblane
  44. 44. Petra Biberbach petra@pas.org.uk 0131 220 9730 • www.pas.org.uk • Online information sheets • Weekly news bulletin • Telephone and online helpline • Follow us on Twitter @PAS_tweets
  45. 45. Euan Hall the Land Trust
  46. 46. David Miller The James Hutton Institute
  47. 47. Places and Spaces for Health and Wellbeing Tuesday 19th May 2015 Saracen House, Glasgow
  48. 48. Rona Gibb Paths for All
  49. 49. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Let’s Get Scotland Walking Rona Gibb Development Manager
  50. 50. Copyright © 2013 Paths for All Our Partners
  51. 51. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Walking is for everyone, everyday,
  52. 52. Copyright © 2013 Paths for All Walking is for everyone, everyday, everywhere.
  53. 53. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Walking benefits both people and places. People who walk have improved health and wellbeing and stronger communities. Well designed and managed places that offer good walking conditions benefit from a more vibrant, accessible and active public environment and subsequently a healthier economy.
  54. 54. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All How do you like to walk?
  55. 55. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Where do you like to walk?
  56. 56. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Why Walking? ……..‘Because it adds up’ Physical inactivity costs the NHS. An inactive person spends 37% more days in hospital and visits the doctor 5.5% more often. The cost to the NHS of physical inactivity was estimated in 2007 at between £1billion and £1.8billion. Physical inactivity costs the wider economy. The costs of physical inactivity were estimated in 2007 at £5.5billion in sickness absence, and £1billion in pre-mature deaths. Including NHS costs, this totals £8.3billion, or £10billion in today’s prices.
  57. 57. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Walking is the most likely way all adults can achieve the recommended levels of physical activity (NICE 2012b) If a medication existed which had a similar effect to physical activity, it would be regarded as a ‘wonder drug’ or ‘miracle cure’ (CMO 2009) Walking is man’s best medicine (Hippocrates) Physical activity is the “best buy in public health” (Faculty of Public Health) Walking has been described as “the nearest activity to perfect exercise” (Morris and Hardman 1997).
  58. 58. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All 7 Scots a day die because of inactivity = 2,500 a year • Second biggest cause of mortality • Kills more people than obesity or alcohol excess. • Can help prevent and treat more than 20 chronic diseases • Getting Scotland fit would increase life expectancy by more than a year due to our high prevalence of inactivity Why do we need to get people more active?
  59. 59. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All © STV
  60. 60. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Recent National Strategies…
  61. 61. The Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A Global Call for Action Launched Toronto April 2010 International Congress Physical Activity for Health Led by Professor Fiona Bull Chair, Global Advocacy for Physical Activity, ISPAH
  62. 62. 7 Investments that work for physical activity 1. ‘Whole-of-school’ programs 2. Transport policies and systems that prioritise walking, cycling and public transport 3. Urban design regulations and infrastructure that provides for equitable and safe access for recreational physical activity, and recreational and transport- related walking and cycling across the life course 4. Physical activity and NCD prevention integrated into primary health care systems 5. Public education, including mass media to raise awareness and change social norms on physical activity 6. Community-wide programs involving multiple settings and sectors & that mobilize and integrate community engagement and resources 7. Sports systems and programs that promote ‘sport for all’ and encourage participation across the life span
  63. 63. Business Employment Research and Innovation Young People Early Years Healthier Inequalities Tackled Life Chances Safe from Crime Sustainable Places Resilient Communities Environment Valued National Identity Impact on Environment Older People Supported Public Services We encourage and enable the inactive to be more active We encourage and enable the active to stay active throughout life We develop physical confidence and competence from the earliest age VISION – A MORE ACTIVE SCOTLAND Physical activity is about getting people moving. Daily walking, playing in a park, going to a gym, training with a team or aspiring to win a gold medal- it doesn’t really matter how people get active, it just matters that we do. Being physically active contributes to our personal, community and national wellbeing. Our vision is of a Scotland where more people are more active more often. We improve our active infrastructure – people and places We support wellbeing and resilience in communities through physical activity and sport We improve opportunities to progress and achieve in sport VISIONActiveScotlandOutcomesNationalOutcomes
  64. 64. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All NWS launched June 2014 Beyond 2014 - Commonwealth Games part of Active Legacy Launched by Michael Mathieson, Minister for Public Health
  65. 65. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All • The National Walking Strategy is a key element in delivering the ten year Physical Implementation Plan. • We want to make Scotland a world leader as a walking friendly country • Walking can contribute positively to areas such as planning, regeneration, economic development, mental and physical health and wellbeing, transport, climate change and education. • Need for many sectors to work together - including town and community planners, transport, schools, recreation and parks, environment etc. Why a Walking Strategy?
  66. 66. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Our Vision A Scotland where everyone benefits from walking as part of their everyday journeys, enjoys walking in the outdoors and where places are well designed to encourage walking. Our 3 Strategic Aims are: ● Create a culture of walking where everyone walks more often as part of their everyday travel and for recreation and well-being ● Better quality walking environments with attractive, well designed and managed built and natural spaces for everyone ● Enable easy, convenient and safe independent mobility for everyone Let’s Get Scotland Walking
  67. 67. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All
  68. 68. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Walking is the key! • Climate Change targets • Health Plans • Tourism Development • Retail Development • Town Centre Management • Crime and Disorder • Public Spaces • Air Quality Management • Neighbourhood Regeneration • Public Transport • Economic Regeneration…….. Can any of the following policies areas be delivered without high quality walking conditions?
  69. 69. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Policy links…
  70. 70. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Policy and Strategy • Single Outcome Agreement (2012) – one of six priorities in SOAs for CPPs is to tackle physical inactivity • National Planning Framework 3 (2014) – Ambition, Opportunity and Place • A More Active Scotland Building a Legacy from the Commonwealth Games (Feb 2014) – 5 themes Environment; Workplace Settings; NHS & Social Care; Education Settings; Sport & Recreation • National Walking Strategy (2014) – Development of Action Plan
  71. 71. Copyright © 2013 Paths for All ‘Achieving lasting change and increasing the number of people choosing to travel actively across all communities as part of their everyday lives’
  72. 72. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Active Travel
  73. 73. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All
  74. 74. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All © Paths for All © Living Streets Scotland
  75. 75. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All • High population density • Mixed land use • High connectivity - easy walking & cycling routes between destinations • Well maintained pedestrian and cycling facilities • Good accessibility – variety of easily reached destinations or facilities (within 5 minutes walk / 400m) • Daily needs within walking distance of most residents Designing Streets: Walkable Neighbourhoods
  76. 76. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All
  77. 77. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All
  78. 78. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All
  79. 79. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Where are people physically active?
  80. 80. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All The vast majority of respondents who are able to walk used street pavements for walking in the past month (88%). Just under two thirds walked in a local park or woodland area (63%), while just over half walked in the countryside or on a local path network (54% and 52% respectively). 76% Strongly agreed that they enjoyed walking because it was good for their health 57% Of parents walked their children to school
  81. 81. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Why Walking? ‘Because it adds up’
  82. 82. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All • Research suggests that making town centres better for walking can boost footfall and trading by up to 40% • Cost Benefit Ratios for walking (and cycling) developments show significant value for money. • A report in 2006 estimated that Fife Coastal Path generated £24-£29 million expenditure in local businesses each year, and supported 800-900 FTE jobs. Value for money
  83. 83. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Walking for Health in Scotland 2013/14
  84. 84. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All
  85. 85. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All
  86. 86. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Community and Individual Pedometer Packs
  87. 87. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Project Resources
  88. 88. Walking Your Way to Strength and Balance
  89. 89. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All
  90. 90. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All • The components work together • The way they’re presented together is important
  91. 91. Users ‘The local GP surgery is delighted we are promoting these walks’
  92. 92. ‘We know a great deal more about path maintenance now and have probably improved our fitness levels’
  93. 93. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Everyone Everyone in Scotland can benefit from walking more. ©Living Streets Scotland ©Sustrans ©Commonwealth Woods ©Alex Greenwood ©Paths for All
  94. 94. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Everyday Walking is something you can easily do everyday. ©Commonwealth Woods ©Paths for All ©Paths for All ©Paths for All ©Paths for All ©Paths for All ©Living Streets Scotland
  95. 95. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All Everywhere Scotland is an amazing place to walk, wherever you are. ©Paths for All ©Paths for All ©Living Streets Scotland
  96. 96. Copyright © 2014 Paths for All If you still need more convincing then take a look at Dr Mike Evans - 23.5 hours on youtube!! http://www.evanshealthlab.com/23-and-12-hours/
  97. 97. Keith Irving Cycling Scotland
  98. 98. Places and Spaces for Health and Wellbeing Tuesday 19th May 2015 Saracen House, Glasgow

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