Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
28 GREEN SCENE • march/april 2010
The FRUITS of Winter
In the gray winter landscape, when we all
could use a little color,...
GREEN SCENE • march/april 2010 29
that ripen in fall and persist until the birds
find them, usually by mid-winter. Fiery r...
30 GREEN SCENE • march/april 201030
together, but be sure to include a male polli-
nator like ‘Jim Dandy.’ A Chinese winte...
GREEN SCENE • march/april 2010 31
COLONIAL
WILLIAMSBURG
AD
LANDSCAPE DESIGN AD
The list of beautiful viburnums with love-
...
32 GREEN SCENE • march/april 2010
MILORGANITE
AD
Callicarpa
GREEN SCENE • march/april 2010 33
PHILADELPHIA ANTIQUE
SHOW AD
FOLIO ART GLASS AD
The Fruits of Winter
spread far and wide...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

GS(mar)WinterBerries

64 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

GS(mar)WinterBerries

  1. 1. 28 GREEN SCENE • march/april 2010 The FRUITS of Winter In the gray winter landscape, when we all could use a little color, many hardy woody plants bear attractive, persistent fruits in shades of red, yellow, or orange. These winter wonders not only feed wildlife and decorate indoor holiday displays, but the very sight of their round, waxy berries has the remarkable ability to cheer our souls. When designing a new garden or landscape planting, take note of this cold-season palette. For starters, what would winter be with- out the hallmark red berries of holly (Ilex)? But other fruiting plants offer stunning color, too, through russet red hips, indigo berries, and violet-fruited clusters. The vibrant pomes, hips, and berries of firethorn, winter- green, red chokeberry, and viburnum make the winter landscape come alive. Some of the best trees for winter color are hawthorns, such as Crataegus viridis ‘Winter King’, a PHS Gold Medal Plant Award winner. The heavy-fruiting, brilliant red chokeber- ry (Aronia arbutifolia ‘Brilliantissima’) pro- duces pendulous clusters of ruby-hued fruits Ilex verticillata ‘Winter Gold’
  2. 2. GREEN SCENE • march/april 2010 29 that ripen in fall and persist until the birds find them, usually by mid-winter. Fiery red foliage in autumn adds to the show, but these plants lose no charm after the leaves have fallen. Most people think of beautyberries as sum- mer fruits, but some cultivars have unusually persistent berries, such as Callicarpa dichotoma ‘Early Amethyst’. Its clusters of glossy, glowing violet berries look even more striking against a backdrop of evergreen foliage. For a cooler look, consider the blue- green foliage of Juniperus scopulorum ‘Wichita Blue’. Big color comes in small packages, too. The fragrant American wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens) comes to mind. Coveted for outdoor holiday containers, its rose-red berries remain colorful for a long time against deep green leaves. Native to North America, Winterberry (Ilex verticillata) and its hybrids arguably top the list of the berried beauties. A deciduous holly, winterberry’s bright berries shine against bare, gray-brown branches unob- structed by foliage. New cultivars with improved color and berry production regu- larly appear in nurseries. Two classic culti- vars, ‘Winter Red’ and ‘Winter Gold’ (both PHS Gold Medal plants), look superb Ilex serrata ‘Gempei’ Viburnum nudum var. cassinoides Viburnum dilatatum
  3. 3. 30 GREEN SCENE • march/april 201030 together, but be sure to include a male polli- nator like ‘Jim Dandy.’ A Chinese winterber- ry relative, Ilex serrata, has a rare, garden-wor- thy cultivar called ‘Gempei’, which boasts pale yellow berries striped with red. Dense clusters of orange-red, orange, or gold fruits decorate the stems of firethorn (Pyracantha sp.). Most garden centers carry tall, prolific, orange-fruited cultivars like the hybrid ‘Mohave’ and P. coccinea ‘Lalandei’. Selections like ‘Soleil D’Or’, with its golden orange pomes, are harder to find, but no more colorful and exciting. Lots of roses have showy hips that last well into winter, but the massive red hips of Rosa rugosa stand out due to their size and complimentary—but wickedly thorny— stems. As they age, the hips darken and lose luster, but still offer captivating color and texture. FISH IN THE GARDEN AD The Fruits of Winter Gaultheria procumbens
  4. 4. GREEN SCENE • march/april 2010 31 COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG AD LANDSCAPE DESIGN AD The list of beautiful viburnums with love- ly winter berries is a long one. Berry clusters of all shapes and sizes sport fruits in pleasing warm or cool shades. The eastern North American possumhaw (Viburnum nudum) has large clusters of small oval berries that are pink in late summer and mature to Concord- grape blue-black. The compact cultivar, ‘Bulk’ (Brandywine™), puts on an impres- sive winter berry display with equally impres- sive purplish-red fall color. The spectacular Wright’s viburnum (Viburnum wrightii) pro- duces broad clusters of small, candy-apple- red berries that light up the dreariest winter days, as do the deep red berries of Viburnum dilatatum. For a showy golden-berried form, choose ‘Michael Dodge’. Like everything in nature, the vivid colors of winter fruit have a purpose. Eye-catching hues attract wildlife and ensure that seeds
  5. 5. 32 GREEN SCENE • march/april 2010 MILORGANITE AD Callicarpa
  6. 6. GREEN SCENE • march/april 2010 33 PHILADELPHIA ANTIQUE SHOW AD FOLIO ART GLASS AD The Fruits of Winter spread far and wide. Birds flock to bold col- ors, particularly red (think Snow White and that tempting apple). The tastiest fruits dis- appear by early winter, so those that persist deep into the season tend to be the least favored by animals. Many berries actually fer- ment on the stem; their flavor and desirabili- ty changes as the season progresses. Birds can actually get drunk by eating late-season berries, often to their detriment. Keep an eye out for weaving waxwings or comical cardi- nals. So this year, instead of just waiting for spring, drink in the fruits of winter. Take time to visit outstanding winter gardens in your area to get ideas for next year’s land- scape. Gardening for winter offers just as many rewards as the warmer seasons—and for some of us, perhaps even more . Visit Jessie’s gardening website at jessiekeith.com.

×