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Theoretical Framework for Place-Based
Climate Change Engagement
Jessica Thompson, PhD
Northern Michigan University
In the next 50 minutes…
Place Based Climate Change Engagement
Theoretical Framework
Summary of Place-based Climate Change
...
"Look, I believe climate change is real.
Every visit we make, such as we are
making here, argues that we need to take
acti...
What is Place-based Engagement?
Meaningful dialogue situated in a specific location,
where audiences interact with each ot...
Glacier Basin Campground at
Rocky Mountain National Park
Glacier Basin Campground at
Rocky Mountain National Park
Place-based Climate Change Engagement
Theoretical Framework
Place
Attachment
Place-based
Learning
Free Choice
Learning
Nor...
How does it help audiences
understand climate change?
Audiences are connected to places; they have unique bonds
with, and ...
How can we change the climate
change conversation in the
context of places we love?
Pilot Sites/AreasPartner Sites for Place-Based CCEP
Kenai
Peninsula
Puget
Sound
Northern
Colorado
D.C.
Area
South
Florida ...
CCEP Sites
Project Pilot SitesRocky Mountain National Park (CO)
Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge (CO)
Bisca...
CCEP Sites
Identify issues & impacts to be communicated
Discover current activities at each site
Identify barriers & oppor...
Survey of Agency Staff & Partners (n = 847)
16 Site Visits & Focus Groups with Site Partners (n = 80)
5 World Café Worksho...
For Example…
Issues & Impacts
74 of 84 workshop participants said effects can be seen now!
Puget Sound (25% said 1-2 effec...
Partner Research Results
Current Activities
#1 – Formal Education Programs (18%)
#2 – Workshops & Meetings (16%)
#3 – Publ...
Partner Research Results
Barriers & Opportunities
Barriers:
- Lack of a connection to people’s
“everyday” (16%)
- Apathy, ...
CCEP Sites
Identify issues & impacts to be communicated
Discover current activities at each site
Identify barriers & oppor...
Audience Research Results
Staff & Visitor Surveys
Agency Staff Survey (courtesy of Bernuth & Williamson Consulting)
- 847 ...
Audience Segmentation in Parks & Refuges
29% 21% 20% 9% 15% 7%
Jan - Dec
2011
n = 4,136
Audience Research Results
Staff & Visitor Surveys
Are the effects of climate change already seen at places
managed by NPS ...
We asked the Staff: Are Your Visitors
Concerned about Climate Change?
13%
32%
39%
8%
1%
Not Concerned Slightly Somewhat Ve...
Then we asked the Visitors: How
Concerned are You about Climate Change?
8% 9%
27%
34%
22%
Not Concerned Slightly Somewhat ...
Should the National Parks and National
Wildlife Refuges be Communicating
about Climate Change with Visitors?
4%
8%9%
25%
8...
Place Attachment Variables
This Park/Refuge is very special to me (n=4,139)
40% 40%
19%
1% 1%
Strongly Agree Agree Neutral...
Place Attachment Variables
I am very attached to this Park/Refuge (n=4,112)
24%
32%
39%
5%
1%
Strongly Agree Agree Neutral...
Place Attachment Variables
This Park/Refuge means a lot to me (n=4,095)
29%
38%
30%
3%
1%
Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Dis...
Personal Responsibility Variables
Because my contribution is very small, I do
not feel responsible for climate change (n=4...
Personal Responsibility Variables
I feel somewhat responsible for the
presently occurring environmental problems
(n=3,965)...
Personal Responsibility Variables
I feel responsible for contributing to the
condition of the climate (n=3,845)
10%
44%
27...
Are you willing to change your behavior
during your visit to help reduce the
impacts of climate change at this place?
29%
...
Ranking Communication / Engagement Method
#1 The Park or Refuge Website (46%)
#2 Trailside Exhibits (42%)
#3 Indoor Exhibi...
Partner Research Results
Ideas for Engagement Strategy
Who is our Target Audience(s)?
#1 – Children / Youth Audiences
#2 –...
Partner Research Results
Top Messages to Communicate:
“We Want The Audience To…”
#1 – Know that they can make a difference...
Partner Research Results
Top Themes for Effective Engagement
#1 – Tell local, personal stories about our changing
landscap...
Place-based Climate Change Engagement
Theoretical Framework
Place
Attachment
Place-based
Learning
Free Choice
Learning
Nor...
THE IMPORTANT MESSAGE ABOUT
COMMUNICATING CLIMATE CHANGE:
There is no template or “ready-made” solution!
We need to experi...
Thank
You!
Go forth and
Change the
Conversation!
Special Thanks to the CCEP Partners & Research
Team!
This project is funded by a grant from the
National Science Foundatio...
Thompson msue talk 8 15-2013
Thompson msue talk 8 15-2013
Thompson msue talk 8 15-2013
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Thompson msue talk 8 15-2013

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Thompson msue talk 8 15-2013

  1. 1. Theoretical Framework for Place-Based Climate Change Engagement Jessica Thompson, PhD Northern Michigan University
  2. 2. In the next 50 minutes… Place Based Climate Change Engagement Theoretical Framework Summary of Place-based Climate Change Engagement Audience Research Suggestions for Moving Forward
  3. 3. "Look, I believe climate change is real. Every visit we make, such as we are making here, argues that we need to take action... Every citizen in America should see what's happening here!”
  4. 4. What is Place-based Engagement? Meaningful dialogue situated in a specific location, where audiences interact with each other and the landscape to develop a deeper understanding about ecological and social interrelationships.
  5. 5. Glacier Basin Campground at Rocky Mountain National Park
  6. 6. Glacier Basin Campground at Rocky Mountain National Park
  7. 7. Place-based Climate Change Engagement Theoretical Framework Place Attachment Place-based Learning Free Choice Learning Norm Activation Theory Situated in Place Situated in Cultural Context Empowers a Specific Action So, how does this help the audience understand climate change?
  8. 8. How does it help audiences understand climate change? Audiences are connected to places; they have unique bonds with, and value specific landscapes/places. Effectively learn through meaningful hands-on activities in that special place or on that landscape. Remember lessons and adopt behaviors when they feel a sense of responsibility & have knowledge of consequences. Thompson & Schweizer, 2009; Schweizer, Thompson & Davis, 2012
  9. 9. How can we change the climate change conversation in the context of places we love?
  10. 10. Pilot Sites/AreasPartner Sites for Place-Based CCEP Kenai Peninsula Puget Sound Northern Colorado D.C. Area South Florida & Keys Place-based Climate Change Education Partnership
  11. 11. CCEP Sites Project Pilot SitesRocky Mountain National Park (CO) Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge (CO) Biscayne National Park (FL) Everglades National Park (FL) National Key Deer Refuge (FL) Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge (FL) Harpers Ferry National Historic Park (WV) National Capital Parks-East (DC) Prince William Forest Park (VA) Kenai Fjords National Park (AK) Kenai National Wildlife Refuge (AK) Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge (WA) Mount Rainier National Park (WA) Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge (WA) North Cascades National Park (WA) Olympic National Park (WA)
  12. 12. CCEP Sites Identify issues & impacts to be communicated Discover current activities at each site Identify barriers & opportunities for collaborating and communicating about climate change Integrate ideas for place-based climate change education/engagement strategy Project Objectives
  13. 13. Survey of Agency Staff & Partners (n = 847) 16 Site Visits & Focus Groups with Site Partners (n = 80) 5 World Café Workshops & Questionnaires (394 participants) Quantitative & Qualitative Visitor Data Collection (survey n = 4,181; interview n = 359) Strategic Planning Workshop (46 participants) Project Activities
  14. 14. For Example… Issues & Impacts 74 of 84 workshop participants said effects can be seen now! Puget Sound (25% said 1-2 effects; 63% said several effects) • Temperature & Precipitation Changes • Water Cycle Changes • Water Quality Changes – “the Dead Zone” • Glacial Melting/Recession
  15. 15. Partner Research Results Current Activities #1 – Formal Education Programs (18%) #2 – Workshops & Meetings (16%) #3 – Publications (15%) #4 – Website, Webinars & Web-based Media #5 – Interpretive Programming #6 – Professional Development & Trainings #7 – Presentations #8 – Special Exhibits & Displays In the Puget Sound 74 of 85 participants said that their agency or organization is already communicating or educating visitors about climate change. Top Activities: Formal Education Curriculum Youth Programming Interpretive Programming Staff Training & Informational Sessions
  16. 16. Partner Research Results Barriers & Opportunities Barriers: - Lack of a connection to people’s “everyday” (16%) - Apathy, disbelief & disinterest (10%) - Lack of urgency/immediacy (9%) - Lack of climate/science literacy - Politicization of the issue - Lack of local evidence / data to illustrate effects Opportunities: - Educate the youth – early and often! (26%) - Focus on the local effects / visible changes (24%) - The potential for collaboration, partnerships & support (18%) - Local action can make a difference! - Make the link to the economy & jobs
  17. 17. CCEP Sites Identify issues & impacts to be communicated Discover current activities at each site Identify barriers & opportunities for collaborating and communicating about climate change Integrate ideas for place-based climate change education/engagement strategy! Project Objectives ✔ ✔ ✔
  18. 18. Audience Research Results Staff & Visitor Surveys Agency Staff Survey (courtesy of Bernuth & Williamson Consulting) - 847 total - 402 National Park Service - 445 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Visitor Survey - 4,181 total - 3, 233 National Parks - 948 National Wildlife Refuges - 51% male / 49% female – average age 54 - 86% Caucasian / 69% with a college degree+ - 33% democrat / 18% republican / 17% independent In the Puget Sound we interviewed 115 and surveyed 1,559 visitors. • 50% male / 50% female • Average age: 45 • 84% Caucasian • 70% with a college degree+ • 33% Democrat / 15% Republican / 17%
  19. 19. Audience Segmentation in Parks & Refuges 29% 21% 20% 9% 15% 7% Jan - Dec 2011 n = 4,136
  20. 20. Audience Research Results Staff & Visitor Surveys Are the effects of climate change already seen at places managed by NPS & USFWS? Agency Staff Visitors 3% 3% 1% 4% 7% 23%17% 46% 71% 24% No Unlikely Perhaps / Neutral Yeah, Probably Yes! Definitely!
  21. 21. We asked the Staff: Are Your Visitors Concerned about Climate Change? 13% 32% 39% 8% 1% Not Concerned Slightly Somewhat Very Concerned Extremely Concerned
  22. 22. Then we asked the Visitors: How Concerned are You about Climate Change? 8% 9% 27% 34% 22% Not Concerned Slightly Somewhat Very Concerned Extremely Concerned
  23. 23. Should the National Parks and National Wildlife Refuges be Communicating about Climate Change with Visitors? 4% 8%9% 25% 87% 67% Agency Staff Visitors No Undecided Yes
  24. 24. Place Attachment Variables This Park/Refuge is very special to me (n=4,139) 40% 40% 19% 1% 1% Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly Disagree
  25. 25. Place Attachment Variables I am very attached to this Park/Refuge (n=4,112) 24% 32% 39% 5% 1% Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly Disagree
  26. 26. Place Attachment Variables This Park/Refuge means a lot to me (n=4,095) 29% 38% 30% 3% 1% Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly Disagree
  27. 27. Personal Responsibility Variables Because my contribution is very small, I do not feel responsible for climate change (n=4,000) 6% 15% 24% 42% 14% Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly Disagree
  28. 28. Personal Responsibility Variables I feel somewhat responsible for the presently occurring environmental problems (n=3,965) 8% 50% 24% 12% 6% Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly Disagree
  29. 29. Personal Responsibility Variables I feel responsible for contributing to the condition of the climate (n=3,845) 10% 44% 27% 12% 8% Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly Disagree
  30. 30. Are you willing to change your behavior during your visit to help reduce the impacts of climate change at this place? 29% 38% 24% 4% 5% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40%
  31. 31. Ranking Communication / Engagement Method #1 The Park or Refuge Website (46%) #2 Trailside Exhibits (42%) #3 Indoor Exhibits (38%) #4 Printed Materials (32%) #5 Films, Movies or Videos (31%) #6 Guided Walks / Talks (26%) #7 Roadside Exhibits (26%) Top Ways Visitors Want to Learn about Climate Change at National Parks & National Wildlife Refuges
  32. 32. Partner Research Results Ideas for Engagement Strategy Who is our Target Audience(s)? #1 – Children / Youth Audiences #2 – Staff #3 – Web Audience
  33. 33. Partner Research Results Top Messages to Communicate: “We Want The Audience To…” #1 – Know that they can make a difference #2 – Understand local examples and have a connection to place #3 – Appreciate that they don’t need to know everything to start taking action! #4 – Take responsibility for everything from understanding the science to lifestyle choices!
  34. 34. Partner Research Results Top Themes for Effective Engagement #1 – Tell local, personal stories about our changing landscape #2 – Utilize new technology and social media #3 – Create a citizen science program #4 – Make connections to the economy, to our families, to patriotism; make it personally relevant
  35. 35. Place-based Climate Change Engagement Theoretical Framework Place Attachment Place-based Learning Free Choice Learning Norm Activation Theory Collaborate to design meaningful, locally-focused, place- based engagement activities with “social” technology Situated in Place Situated in Cultural Context Empowers a Specific Action Ecological & Organizational Research Audience Research 4,181 surveys 349 interviews 16 focus groups 6 workshops Create Regional, Multi-Jurisdictional “Community of Practices”
  36. 36. THE IMPORTANT MESSAGE ABOUT COMMUNICATING CLIMATE CHANGE: There is no template or “ready-made” solution! We need to experiment with – and – test different strategies and tactics. Making progress means that we link our understanding of ecological changes with our understanding of our audience(s) and develop meaningful, contextual messages to engage them in climate dialogue and action.
  37. 37. Thank You! Go forth and Change the Conversation!
  38. 38. Special Thanks to the CCEP Partners & Research Team! This project is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation, award number DBI-1059654 For More Information & Reports: climatechangepartnership.org

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