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Designing Decisions - UX Scotland 2019

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Curated lists of recommendations – for products, programmes, or even services – make users’ decisions easier by limiting the options available to them. But is offering fewer choices necessarily the same thing as creating good user experiences? When an increasing proportion of what users see at all is determined by algorithms, how can we as UX professionals make sure that these experiences continue to be as valuable for users as they are for online retailers?

In this session, we will consider how insights from psychology, behavioural economics and workshop participants' own experiences can help us evaluate, design - and even make better choices ourselves.

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Designing Decisions - UX Scotland 2019

  1. 1. Designing Decisions Jessica Cameron Lead User Researcher Twitter @jessscameron 12 June 2019
  2. 2. (My) agenda • We do not make decisions in rational ways • Technology is changing how we make decisions • Can we help make sure that these changes are improving the user experience? • Or at least not harming it?
  3. 3. Decision making is hard. Our job is to make it easier. Photo by Tyler Nix for Unsplash
  4. 4. How we make decisions
  5. 5. System 1 System 2 Information processing Photos by Goh Rhy Yan and Dan Gold on Unsplash
  6. 6. We are given a set of options We need to be able to process and evaluate those options We need to figure out which of those options is the best We’re only human… Photo by Daniel Cheung on Unsplash
  7. 7. 1. We are given a set of options “If you control the menu, you control the choices.” Tristan Harris
  8. 8. Time Cost CO2 1:20 £68 193 Kg 4:20 £94 24 Kg 1. We are given a set of options
  9. 9. 1. We are given a set of options
  10. 10. Working memory is limited in capacity and duration It suffers when people are distracted by irrelevant information Hick’s Law: The time it takes to make a decision increases with the number and complexity of choices 2. We need to process and remember those options
  11. 11. 2. We need to process and remember those options
  12. 12. 2. We need to process and remember those options
  13. 13. 2. We need to process and remember those options
  14. 14. We find it easier to make decisions when we can see the information in front of us. Alternate presentations of information need to rely on different strategies. 2. We need to process and remember those options
  15. 15. 3. We need to figure out which of those options is the best Photo by Victoriano Izquierdo on Unsplash
  16. 16. Design features
  17. 17. Design features
  18. 18. Decoy options
  19. 19. Decoy options
  20. 20. Decoy options
  21. 21. Decoy options
  22. 22. Defaults
  23. 23. Defaults: Vulture
  24. 24. Defaults: Gap
  25. 25. Social influence
  26. 26. Recommendations: Amazon
  27. 27. Recommendations: Booking.com
  28. 28. Social influence: Booking.com
  29. 29. Photo by pixpoetry on Unsplash Autonomy and free will We resist losing control Best to use nudges, not sledgehammers But user beware: choices may not be choices at all
  30. 30. Photo by Matt Noble on Unsplash
  31. 31. Changing technology
  32. 32. Photo by Matt Noble on Unsplash We don’t even have to choose our own clothes anymore
  33. 33. Photo by Matt Noble on Unsplash We are living in the future
  34. 34. Photo by Matt Noble on Unsplash We are living in the future “Data is the foundation for virtually every part of our business. From the playlist personalization engine to the ad targeting capability, we have turned even more to data science. Every year brings billions of more listening hours with the associated additional preference information, adding more and more precision to our song-selection.” Tim Westergren, Letter to Shareholders, 2016
  35. 35. We are living in the future
  36. 36. Photo by Matt Noble on Unsplash Who do we trust to make these decisions for us? Photos by Tim van der Kuip on Unsplash, MarketWatch/Everett Collection
  37. 37. Photo by Matt Noble on Unsplash Example: Facebook
  38. 38. Example: Netflix We are given a set of options We need to be able to process and evaluate those options We need to figure out which of those options is the best
  39. 39. Example: Netflix We are given a set of options “Netflix has identified over 2,000 taste communities. In one group are subscribers who streamed House of Cards and also It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.” https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/nicolenguyen/netflix- recommendation-algorithm-explained-binge-watching
  40. 40. Example: Netflix We need to be able to process and evaluate those options British Movies based on a book from the 1980s Campy Horror Movies Comic Book and Superhero Movies for ages 11 to 12 Foreign Vampire Movies from the 1970s Understated Biographical Documentaries https://gist.github.com/blech/7818890
  41. 41. Example: Netflix We need to figure out which of those options is the best https://medium.com/netflix-techblog/artwork-personalization-c589f074ad76
  42. 42. Example: Netflix And then once we’ve started, we make the easy decision to continue… Even if we know it’s not in our best interests
  43. 43. Example: YouTube
  44. 44. Example: Twitter
  45. 45. Activity Defining our research questions xx
  46. 46. How can we do user research that will help us balance the pros and cons of ‘supported’ decisions? What matters most to users? • Is it useful? • Is it helpful? • Is it trustworthy? • Is it understandable? What are the questions we can ask? https://www.nngroup.com/articles/machine-learning-ux/ How can we keep the user at the centre of technology?
  47. 47. Choose any service (website or app) you wish to evaluate – your own, one that you are familiar with, or one you’ve seen for the first time today. Some suggestions: • Any of the examples from this talk • Netflix, YouTube, Twitter, Amazon, Booking.com, LuckyTrip, Stitch Fix… • eBay • Hopper • Google Trips Which services can we consider?
  48. 48. USEFUL Are users guided towards the best choices for them, or not? Are inputs and outputs transparent or hidden? HELPFUL TRUSTWORTHY UNDERSTANDABLE Research Map Does it make users comfortable or nervous? Does it save users time, or cost them time? Designing Decisions workshop | UX Scotland 2019 | Jessica Cameron | @jessscameron
  49. 49. mudano.com info@mudano.com @WeAreMudano Social icon Circle Only use blue and/or white. For more details check out our Brand Guidelines. Thank you Jessica Cameron @jessscameron

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