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SFPUC_One Water Summit_4.26.16

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SFPUC_One Water Summit_4.26.16

  1. 1. 1 US Water Alliance Presents: San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Community Benefits Commitments in Contracts Jessica Buendia SFPUC Community Benefits Program www.sfwater.org/communitybenefits
  2. 2. 2 1 p.m. - 1:20 p.m. Introductions 1:20 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. SFPUC Presentation 2:00 - 2:05 p.m. “Sewer System Improvement Program Cityworks: An Internship Program of the SFPUC” (Video) 2:05 p.m. - 2:35 p.m. Community Benefits Panel 2:35 - 2:40 p.m. “You Can’t Live a Day Without Me” (Video) 2:40 p.m. - 2:50 p.m. Break 2:50 p.m. - 3:20 p.m. Technical Assistance Sessions 3:20 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Closing Agenda
  3. 3. 3 San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Presentation
  4. 4. SewerWater Power Our Mission in a manner that is inclusive of environmental and community interests, and that sustains the resources entrusted to our care To provide customers with high quality, efficient and reliable water, power, and sewer services… 4
  5. 5. San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) PROVIDING HIGH QUALITY WATER, POWER, and SEWER SERVICES
  6. 6. 6 $850 Million Operating Budget 2,300 Employees $4.6 Billion Water System Improvement Program $6.9 Billion Sewer System Improvement Program The SFPUC Opportunity
  7. 7. 7 Guiding Policies Agency-Wide •Environmental Justice Policy (2009) •Community Benefits Policy (2011) City-Wide •Local Hiring Policy for Construction (2010) •Local Business Enterprise (Updated 2010, 2015)
  8. 8. Over 60 face-to-face stakeholder interviews, focus groups, surveys 2011 Community Benefits Report 8
  9. 9. Our Good Neighbor Policies Community Benefits 2011 Environmental Justice 2009 Education Workforce and Economic Development Environmental Justice & Land Use Arts and Culture Developing the next generation of environmental stewards, ratepayers and skilled workforce Enriching communities through arts and cultural programs that align with the agency’s values and goals Advancing our talent pipeline and creating new opportunities for workers and businesses Integrating environmental justice to support a healthy place for people to live, work, learn and play Community Benefits Program
  10. 10. Bayview Hunters Point Sewer System Improvement Program
  11. 11. 11 Community Benefits in Contracts Leveraging public, private, and community partnerships
  12. 12. Partnerships Statistics • 45 Professional Service Contracts which has generated nearly $7 million in direct financial contributions, volunteer hours, and in-kind donations for schools and nonprofits • Firms have impacted dozens of organizations and hundreds of residents to providing internship opportunities, adopting schools, building community gardens and playgrounds, investing in work readiness programming, and conducting trainings at the Contractors Assistance Center • We are expanding the program into alternative design contracts (i.e. design build, CMGC)
  13. 13. Participating Firms
  14. 14. 14 Program Process Chart
  15. 15. How does it work? • This is a deliverable, zero-dollar task • Community Benefit submittals are allocated points in the review process • Community Benefits submittals are voluntary but the commitments are considered binding once they are in the final agreement • Activities related to the commitments can only commence once there is a Notice to Proceed (NTP) associated with this project • The funds are intended to support nonprofit or charitable activities 15
  16. 16. • Proposals are reviewed by an external panel of community benefits experts • The community benefits submittal is worth 5% of the total points allocated to the written portion • Evaluation is based on the following criteria: 1. Application Check List 2. Work Approach 3. Project Team and Organization 4. Community Benefits Commitments 5. Accountability, Performance, and Deliverables 16 Proposal Review Process
  17. 17. 17 (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) Description of Community Benefit/ Initiative Community Partner (when applicable) Expected Outcomes (be as specific as possible) Timetable & Duration Direct Financial Contribution Volunteer Hours Volunteer Hourly Rate ($150 Volunteer Rate) Total Value of Volunteer Hours (B x C) In-Kind Contributions Total Contributions (A + D + E) 1. 2. TOTAL Table will be included in the final agreement Community Benefits Table
  18. 18. Once a Contract has been Awarded: • Schedule a meeting with the AGM of External Affairs Division to develop a Work Plan and Timeline within 3 months of issuance of an NTP • Schedule annual meetings with the Community Benefits Manager over the life of the contract to review the Work Plan and Timeline • Submit to the Community Benefits Manager: • Quarterly Reports (including documents to verify delivery of commitments) • Annual Reports 18 Reporting
  19. 19. 19 Reporting Financial Volunteer In-Kind Total $3,259,007 $3,058,213 $599,170 $6,916,390 • Data collected from 45 Professional Service Contracts between June 2011 - January 2016. • The total contract value for the 45 professional service contracts is: $437,050,000.
  20. 20. 20 Reporting
  21. 21. 21 Support Career Opportunities for Residents
  22. 22. 22 Support Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Education
  23. 23. 23 Support Businesses and Merchants
  24. 24. 24 Support Environmental Justice and Urban Agriculture
  25. 25. 25 Technical Assistance Sessions: 1. Group 1: Making the Policy and Legal Case • Juliet Ellis, Assistant General Manager of External Affairs • Masood Ordikhani, Workforce and Economic Program Services Director 2. Group 2: Making the Business Case • Marty Dorward, Sr. Vice President, AECOM • Tom Birmingham, Vice President, Brown and Caldwell • Stephen Robinson, Area Manager/Supervising Engineer, MWH Global 3. Group 3: Making the Case for the Community • Jessica Buendia, Manager, SFPUC Community Benefits • DJ Brookter, Executive Director, Southeast Community Facility

Editor's Notes

  • Structure of Presentation
    Session Agenda:
    1. Introductions and Agenda Overview (20 minutes)
    Moderator: Kay Fernandez Smith, Community Benefits and Social Responsibility Director
    2. San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Presentation (40 minutes)
    Juliet Ellis, Assistant General Manager of External Affairs – Discuss the passage of the innovative community benefits policy (5 minutes)
    Masood Ordikhani, Workforce and Economic Program Services Director – Discuss the initial integration of Community Benefits Commitments into Contracts (5 minutes)
    Jessica Buendia, SFPUC Community Benefits Manager – Discuss ongoing implementation of the community benefits in contracts program (10 minutes)
    Questions (20 minutes)
    3. “Sewer System Improvement Program Cityworks: An Internship Program of the SFPUC” (5 minutes) https://vimeo.com/152625152/818476fe4b?lite=1
    4. Community Benefits Panel (30 minutes)
    Panel (30 minutes – intro and up to 3 questions)
    Marty Dorward, Sr. Vice President, AECOM
    Tom Birmingham, Vice President, Brown and Caldwell
    Stephen Robinson, Area Manager/Senior Engineer, MWH Americas, Inc.
    DJ Brookter, Executive Director, Southeast Community Facility
    5. “You Can’t Live a Day Without Me” SFPUC Sewer Rap (5 minutes) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYJ7aTkEh4A
    6. Session Break (10 minutes)
    Distribute Materials
    7. Technical Assistance Break Out Sessions (30 minutes)
    Making the Policy and Legal Case
    Juliet Ellis, Assistant General Manager of External Affairs
    Masood Ordikhani, Workforce and Economic Program Services Director
    Making the Business Case
    Marty Dorward, Sr. Vice President, AECOM
    Tom Birmingham, Vice President, Brown and Caldwell
    Stephen Robinson, Area Manager/Supervising Engineer, MWH Global
    Making the Case for the Community
    Jessica Buendia, Manager, SFPUC Community Benefits
    DJ Brookter, Executive Director, Southeast Community Facility
    9. Closing (10 minutes)
    Moderator: Kay Fernandez Smith, Community Benefits and Social Responsibility Director
  • Kay:
    Workshop Overview
    During this Institute, attendees will get an in-depth view of the SFPUC’s Community Benefits Program. It will be a unique opportunity to hear from the partners that make this successful program happen including: SFPUC executive leadership; community benefits and contract administration experts; and participating firms and nonprofit organizations. The session will include technical assistance sessions where conference attendees can discuss how they can apply this strategy within their own jurisdictions; and all participants will receive a toolkit of materials. We will have a 10 minute break in between.
    Audience Introductions
    I’d like to begin with a round of introductions and simple sentence about what you hope to gain from this workshop [if there are more than 30 people, just ask for their name and the City where they are from].
  • Kay:
    Begin Agenda
    We are very happy to have all of you in the room.
    The first item on the agenda is a presentation from the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission.
  • Juliet:
    Transition
    In the next five minutes, my goal is to give you a broader sense of who the SFPUC is, discuss the community benefits and environmental justice policies, and tell you about our groundbreaking Community Benefits Program – of which the community benefits commitments in contracts is one part of.
    Mission
    The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission provides customers with high quality, efficient, and reliable water, power, and sewer services
    In a manner that is inclusive of environmental and community interests, and that sustains the resources entrusted to our care.
  • Juliet:
    The SFPUC Opportunity
    The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission is the 3rd largest water utility in California.
    We provide water, sewer, and municipal power to San Francisco and the region.
    Our service area spans 7 counties.
  • Juliet:
    Scale
    The SFPUC has an operating budget of $850 million.
    It is one of the largest employers in the region (2,300 employees) – with jobs that we know won’t be shipped overseas.
    In additional, we are leveraging billions of dollars of capital projects.
  • Juliet:
    Guiding Policies
    I became a Commissioner at the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission in 2009 and worked with the community to pass the groundbreaking environmental justice and community benefits policies that guide the Agency’s efforts to be a “good neighbor” to all whose lives or neighborhoods are directly affected by the operations of the Agency.
    These values are built into the agency’s mission and we take pride to be the first public utility in the nation to create Environmental Justice and Community Benefits policies.
    The policies were passed around the same time as the Board of Supervisors adopted a local hire ordinance and updated the local business enterprise for the City.
    The CB, EJ, local hire, and LBE policies gave the community policy tools to hold the PUC accountable as the agency moved forward with its operations and capital programs.
    Now, whenever we do business, The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) has to take into account how we can be a good neighbor and give back to the communities we serve while protecting the environment.
  • Juliet:
    SFPUC Community Benefits Report
    To develop the priority areas in the community benefits policy, the SFPUC proactively engaged a diverse group of community stakeholders.
    In 2011, the consulting team of Davis & Associates and Merriwether & Williams, conducted comprehensive stakeholder outreach including more than 60 individual interviews, online surveys, and community meetings.
    They also conducted a national scan of other comparable public utilities across the country.
    The team found that the SFPUC was investing in 80+ programs that provided community benefits.
    The report shown here, ultimately informed the creation of the Agency-wide community benefits program.
  • Juliet:
    The Community Benefits Program
    Through the Community Benefits Policy, we were able to secure resources to bring on a team of dedicated professionals who’s job it is to implement the Community Benefits and Environmental Justice Policy throughout the agency. This team of talented and diverse professionals, manages our community-benefits initiatives and collaborates with staff from the bureaus and enterprises to ensure these policies are integrated into the SFPUC’s work.
    Our program’s priority areas are focused on: Education; Workforce and Economic Development; Environmental Justice and Land Use; and Arts and Culture.
  • Masood:
    Transition
    As Juliet mentioned, in the next five minutes, my goal is to tell you about why the SFPUC began integrating community benefits into contracts.
    Context/Background = Bayview Hunters Point
    As Juliet mentioned earlier, the SFPUC had a $6.9 billion Sewer System Improvement Program that was set to begin in 2012.
    SSIP is investing $2 billion to upgrade the wastewater treatment plant alone which you can see circled here [refer to slide].
    80% of the City’s Wastewater is processed in Bayview-Hunters Point community – a diverse, low-income neighborhood in San Francisco made up of 1/3 African Americans, 1/3 Asians, and 1/3 Latinos and whites.
    It is the only wastewater plant in San Francisco that is located across the street from people’s homes and over the years there have been myriad complaints, including concerns about odors.
    The Sewer System Improvement Program was an opportunity to leave the place better than it was. To do our part to support a healthy, vibrant community
    Community Benefits Strategy for SSIP
    The SFPUC community benefits strategy for SSIP is focused on creating economic inclusion opportunities for all residents, particularly those in the Southeast. We do this in the following ways [choose a few examples]:
    Education - work with the SF Unified School District to prepare young people to careers in our sector with a focus on schools is Bayview Hunters Point.
    Workforce Development
    Create opportunities for individuals from the neighborhood, especially those with multiple barriers to employment, with find stable careers.
    Offering 1200 paid summer jobs for local youth, largely from low-income communities and communities of color.
    Expanding a pre-apprenticeship program strategy to provide more opportunities for residents to connect with water infrastructure-related mission critical careers
    Implementing Local Hire and have exceeded expectations on our projects (i.e WSIP/SSIP) [Include current statistics on Local Hire for SSIP and WSIP]
    Small Business Development
    Providing assistance to local contractors to ensure that Bayview businesses can compete for contracts within the City. [Women in Construction/HSIP Regional/Breakfast]
    Launching a Contractors Assistance Center located in Bayview Hunters Point (Green Infrastructure Training)
    Environmental Justice
    Finally, we are investing in the Southeast Community Facility: SFPUC is investing $20-30M in improvements and public arts investments to build a new Southeast Community Facility
    We are also integrating environmental justice analysis throughout the SSIP + creating a tool box of implementation tools.
  • Masood:
    CB Commitments in Contracts:
    As an extension of our community benefits and environmental justice policies, we directly asked our Sewer System Improvement Program contractors to partner with us to deliver the community benefits I just spoke about to the community.
    The Sewer System Improvement Program was the first professional service contract to include community benefits. It was a $150 million contract. The firm that won the contract committed $1.5 million in community benefits. Marty from AECOM/Parsons is here with us today.
    Since then, we’ve standardized the incorporation of community benefits into all professional services contracts of $5M and above. We were able to bring on firms like MWH and Brown and Caldwell.
  • Jessie:
    Transition:
    Thanks Masood. As Masood mentioned, I was hired to operationalize, standardize and expand the program.
    Partnership:
    What I tell all of the firms that we work with is that our Community Benefits Program is in the business of building public-private-community partnership initiatives. We partner with community organizations, invest our own public resources, and we leverage the resources of our private sector partners.
    In the last 4 years, we have included Community Benefits Commitments into 45 Professional Services Contracts
    This strategy has generated nearly $7 million in direct financial contributions, volunteer hours, and in-kind donations for schools and nonprofits over the next 15 years from large engineering & technical services consulting firms.
    Firms have impacted dozens of organizations and hundreds of residents to providing internship opportunities, adopting schools, building community gardens and playgrounds, invested in work readiness, and conducting trainings at the Contractors Assistance Center
    We are expanding into alternative design contracts. The first contract awarded has generated $4.5 million in financial contributions, volunteer hours, and workforce trainee hours [only share information if it has been approved]. It is an $800 million contract.
  • Jessie
    Participating Firms:
    Here is a sample list of participating firms. As you can see, it includes large multinational corporation, as well as regional and local businesses. Many of these same firms are likely to be active in your jurisdiction.
  • Jessie
    Lifecycle of the program:
    Here is the lifecycle of the Community Benefits in Contracts Program. It follows the normal contract process - it begins by working with the Project Manager and Contract Analyst on the development of the Request for Proposals, extends through the bid process, into the scoring, and the final contract negotiation.
    After the contract has been awarded, the Community Benefits Manager executes the contract, develops the work plan and timeline, and manages compliance on the reporting.
    In your folder, you will find:
    The Community Benefits and Environmental Justice Policies
    This process chart
    Sample pre-bid agenda
    Sample review panel and conflict of interest form
    Sample scoresheet
    RFP template language for professional service and alternative design contracts
    Contract template language
  • Jessie
    How does it work?
    At all pre-bids, we explain the following to prospective contractors:
    The CB Commitments Task is a deliverable zero-dollar task meaning that zero hours should be allotted in your overhead and profit schedule for this task.
    Community benefits are allocated points during the review process; commitments are included in the final agreement and are considered binding
    Activities related to the commitments can only commence once there is a Notice to Proceed (NTP) associated with the project.
    The funds are intended to support nonprofit or charitable activities, no financial contribution can come to the SFPUC.
    Essentially, it is managed and tracked just like a project. The only different is that you aren’t penalized if you go over-budget!
  • Jessie
    Proposal Review Process
    At every pre-bid, we also explain the proposal review process:
    The submittal is reviewed by a separate panel of three people who have CB expertise
    The CB Submittal is 5% of the total appoints allocated in the written portion.
    You will be evaluated in the following sections:
    Section 1: Application Check List
    Section 2: Work Approach
    Section 3: Project Team/Organization
    Section 2: Community Benefits Commitments
    Section 3: Accountability, Performance and Deliverables
  • Jessie
    Community Benefits Table
    The most important part of the proposal is the community benefits table.
    Description of any CB commitments in terms of dollars, hours, and in-kind donations.
    It should all be translated into a monetary amount.
    The table will be included in your final agreement.
  • Jessie
    Reporting
    Once a contract has been awarded, the firm schedules a meeting with the AGM of External Affairs to develop a Work Plan and Timeline within 3 months of issuance of an NTP
    Schedule annual meetings with the Community Benefits Manager over the life of the contract to review the Work Plan and Timeline
    Submit to the Community Benefits Manager:
    Quarterly Reports (including documents to verify delivery of commitments)
    Annual Reports: (for online publication)
  • Jessie
    Reporting
    We do regular report to the AGM’s regarding the firm investments.
  • Jessie
    Reporting
    A majority of the contracts are from Wastewater Enterprise because of the Sewer System Improvement Program.
    A majority of the commitments go to workforce development.
    Our community benefits team and the firms work alongside each other for the life of the agreement. Since, we started working together almost 4 years ago, we’ve been able to collaborate on some amazing projects that:
    Support Career Opportunities for Residents
    Support STEM education
    Support Business Opportunities
    Support Urban Agriculture and Environmental Justice
  • ×