Quantum Mechanics by Dr Steven Spencer

1,257 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,257
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Quantum Mechanics by Dr Steven Spencer

  1. 1. How  We  See  the  Ma,er  That  Makes   All  Things   Steven  Spencer   Applied  Mathema;cian     Philosophers  Corner   2nd  October  2012   1  
  2. 2. Outline  •  The  world  of  classical  physics  •  Things  don’t  quite  add  up!  •  Enter  the  quantum  •  The  mechanics  and  the  quantum  •  Stranger  and  stranger  •  What  does  it  mean?  •  Where  is  the  mind  in  all  this?  •  Are  you  sure?   2  
  3. 3. The  world  of  classical  physics  •  Determinis,c  (Laplace  1749  -­‐  1827)    •  External  observer  and  isolated  experimental   systems  •  Par,cles  (Newton  1642  -­‐1727)  •  Waves  (Hooke,  Huygens,  Young,  Maxwell)   3  •  Atomic  theory  (Dalton)  
  4. 4. Things  don’t  quite  add  up  •  Black-­‐body  thermal  radia,on  →  colours    •  Stable  atoms  •  Line  emission  spectra  •  Photoelectric  effect   4  
  5. 5. Enter  the  Quantum  •  The  physics  of  atomic  and  sub-­‐atomic  scales?  •  Energy  is  emiUed  in  ‘bits’  (quanta)  (Planck,   1900)  →  tricky  maths?      •   Energy  in  light  is  in  ‘grainy  bits’  (photons)   which  are  par$cles  with  wave  proper,es  →   photoelectric  effect  (Einstein,  1905)   5  
  6. 6. Two  views  of  EM  radia;on  •  Light  is  a  wave!                                    Light  is  a  par,cle!   6  
  7. 7. The  Mechanics  and  the  Quantum  •  Orbital  atomic  theory  (Rutherford,  1911)  •  Quan,sed  electron  orbit  atomic  model   (Bohr,  1913)  →  ‘flights  and  perchings’    •  Par,cles  are  waves!  (de  Broglie,  1924)  →   orbi,ng  electrons  have  integer   wavelengths!    •  Matrix  mechanics  (Heisenberg,  1925)  →   unanschaulich  atomic  world!   7  
  8. 8. •  Wave  mechanics  (Schrodinger,  1926)  →  how  the   quantum  state  of  a  system  evolves  with  ,me.   Anschaulich  atomic  world?  •  Complementarity  –  wave-­‐par,cle  duality    •  Determinis$c  descrip,on  for  wave  func$ons    +   Sta$s$cal  descrip,on  of  maUer  and  energy.    •  Uncertainty  principle  (Heisenberg,  1927)   Momentum  and  posi$on  cannot  be  simultaneously   measured  with  unlimited  precision.   8  
  9. 9. The  observer  and  the  system  •  The  role  of  the  classical  observer   (measurement)  of  a  quantum  system   becomes  central  and  hotly  contested  –       “We  are  not  only  observers.  We  are   par,cipators.  In  some  strange  sense,  this  is  a   par,cipatory  universe.”  –  John  A.  Wheeler   9  
  10. 10. The  Quantum  World?  •  Wave  func,on  evolu,on  U(objec,ve  &   determinis,c)  +  measurement  R(subjec,ve)  =   confusion?!?   10  
  11. 11. Electron  Double  Slit  Experiment   (Feynman)  •  Detector  ‘D’  turned   on  or  off  by  observer   →  affects  paUern  on   screen  by  double  slit.   Observer  affects     outcome  of  experiment!   11  
  12. 12. Stranger  and  stranger  •  Superposi;on  of  states  →  possible  in  quantum   but  not  classical  world  (Schrodinger’s  cat).  •  Quantum  emtanglement  →  Many  par,cle   systems  have  a  complicated  combined   wavefunc,on  even  at  ‘large’  distances!  •  Einstein-­‐Podolski-­‐Rosen  (EPR)  effect  –  QM  is   either  ‘non-­‐local’  (faster    than  light  influences)   or  is  not  a  complete  theory!    •  Bell  inequali,es  –  QM  wins  again!   12  
  13. 13. Schrodinger’s  Cat  Thought  Experiment!   •  Quantum   superposi,on   affects  the   classical   world?   13  
  14. 14. ‘Spooky  ac;on  at  a  distance’  (Einstein)   •  Before  detec,on  the  electron  wave  is   ‘everywhere’,  at  detec,on  the  wave  func,on   collapses  throughout  the  universe!   14  
  15. 15. •  Single  source  of  two  photons  –  ‘spin’   observa,on  method  at  one  end  affects   observa,on  at  a  distant  point!  Do  par,cles   communicate  with  one  another  or  are  they   one  en,ty  ?!?   15  
  16. 16. •  Standard  QM  violates  Bell’s  theorem.  Separated   par,cles  are  connected  (entanglement)!?!    •  Result  confirmed  by  experiment  (Aspect,  1982)!!   16  
  17. 17. What  does  it  mean?  •  Star;ng  point  –  no  experiment  has  ever  been   found  that  concludes  against  QM  maths!  •  Whatever  happened  to  determinism?     “God  does  not  play  dice”  –  A.  Einstein                                                        vs   “A  physical  object  has  an  ontologically   undetermined  component  that  is  not  due  to   the  epistemological  limita,ons  of  physicists’   understanding”  –  A.  Eddington   17  
  18. 18. •  Ontologies  (interpreta;ons)  –       a)  Copenhagen  (Bohr,  Heisenberg  and  Born,  1927)   –  Complementarity  +  uncertainty  principle  +   measurement    +  correspondence  principle.     QM  describes  knowledge  NOT  reality!     “There  is  no  quantum  world.  There  is  only  an   abstract  physical  descrip,on.”  -­‐  N.  Bohr     “The  idea  of  intermediate  kinds  of  reality  was  just   the  price  one  had  to  pay”  –  W.  Heisenberg   18  
  19. 19. b)  Many-­‐worlds  /  rela;ve  state  (EvereU,  1957)  –  universal  wavefunc,on  never  collapses  →  mul,verse      c)  Environmental  decoherence  –  rapid  disappearance  of  quantum  superposi,ons  by  interac,on  with  environment  (useful  for  many  interpreta,ons).    d)  Ensemble  (Einstein)  –  Minimalist,  sta,s,cal  –  wavefunc,on  for  large  numbers  of  par$cles  only.    e)  Rela;onal  –  different  observers  see  different  quantum  states.       19  
  20. 20.  f)  Pilot-­‐wave  (de  Broglie,  Bohm)  –  Par,cles  guided  by  wavefunc,on.  Non-­‐local,  holis,c  universe,  hidden  variables.  g)  Objec;ve  collapse  (Penrose)  –  physical  mechanism  of  collapse  –  extended  QM.  h)  Conciousness  collapse    -­‐  subjec,ve  reduc,on  (von  Neumann/Wigner)  &  par,cipatory  anthropic  principle  (J.A.  Wheeler)  g)  New  theories  (many!)  –  objec,ve  R  wave  func,on  collapse  /  non-­‐linear  U  func,on.   20  
  21. 21. Where  is  the  mind  in  all  this?  •  What  is  a  brain?  •  Dense  network  –  more     than  104  cell  bodies  and   km  of  wiring  per  cubic  mm!    •  Mul,ple  cell  types:  spiking   Q: Is the mind neurons  (1011  cells)  for  info   (consciousness) processing,  analog  neurons     highly organised &  ‘supporter’  cells  .   brain activity? 21  
  22. 22. Neuronal  Behaviour  ⇒ 22  
  23. 23. Quantum  Theory  of  Mind  •  Non-­‐algorithmic  thought  →  cannot  be  modelled  by  a   digital  (Turing)  computer.      •  Consciousness  as  a  quantum  mechanical  phenomenon   (Penrose  &  Hameroff)  –   Hypothesis:  Neuron  microtubules  within  neurons  support   quantum  superposi,ons  (non-­‐computable  behaviour)  +   macroscopic  quantum  entanglement  across  brain.  •  Highly  controversial  –  decoherence  counter-­‐argument!    •  Physical  collapse  of  quantum  wavefunc,on  of   microtubules  essen,al  for  consciousness  (Orch-­‐OR).   23  
  24. 24. Complex  Dynamical  Behaviour  Theory   of  Mind  •  Intrinsic  non-­‐linear  dynamics  of  each  individual  neuron  +   network  dynamics  (aUractors,  bifurca,ons  of  behaviour,   small  changes  in  inputs  lead  to  large  changes  in  outputs).  •  ‘Simple’  non-­‐linear  models  found  for  behaviour  of   individual  spiking  neurons  →  reproduce  complex  burs,ng   behaviour.  •  Apparently  non-­‐algorithmic  behaviour  (some,mes  chaos)   from  algorithmic  (determinis,c)  components.      •  Consciousness  as  an  emergent  phenomenon  from  a  neural   network  complex  dynamical  system  of  the  physical  brain.     24  
  25. 25. Are  you  sure?  •  An  underlying  level  of  reality?    •  Quantum  state  decoherence  and  gravitons?    •  Non-­‐linear  quantum  theory      •  The  classical-­‐quantum  divide  -­‐  looking  for   decoherence  • To  be  con;nued…   25  
  26. 26. THANK  YOU!!!   26  

×