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$13,003,285
97
100,000
In 2014
2014Annual Report
United Way
of Greater Knoxville’s
&2013 Leaders In Giving
TO HELP
CITIZENS
BY FUNDING
WAS DONATED
COMMUNITY
PROGRAMS
I
n 2014, United Way of Greater Knoxville experienced several firsts for this 93 year old organization. Under the 	
leadership of our Campaign Chair, Randy Boyd, we exceeded a historic goal of $13,000,000! The room was electric
when he announced the victory, with the help of his little brother, Jojo. Further proving that he is truly a visionary,
Randy incorporated a transformational project within the campaign for the first time. He and his volunteers raised over
more than $200,000 to support Helen Ross McNabb Center’s (HRMC) Homeless Veterans Supportive Housing Project.
We were able to help HRMC finish the housing project so 20 homeless veterans now have a home to call their own.
Another of Randy’s original ideas that he worked to achieve, was to ask a group of very generous donors to allocate their
gifts to cover United Way’s operating costs. This allowed Randy and his volunteers to campaign to the public that 100%
of their gift to United Way went straight to the deserving organizations we support through our grant-making process.
Thanks to the Board of Directors, and the Branding & Messaging Committee led by Tiffany Carpenter, we hired an
advertising agency, Mary Beth West Communications, to develop and implement a multi-channel communications and
marketing plan. For the first time ever, United Way of Greater Knoxville purchased a broadcast media schedule. This
project and several others were a result of our strategic planning process held in the fall of 2013 and the implementation
of our five focus areas: raising more money, strengthening our community partnerships, connecting with our younger
generation, increasing our awareness in the community and being transparent in all matters.
I am thrilled to have been a part of this organization during this year of historic firsts.
It is hard to believe my two year term as United Way of Greater Knoxville’s Board Chair has come to a close, as it seems
like I just started yesterday. I want to thank the Board of Directors for their support, the hundreds of volunteers who
gave their time, talents and energy, the many donors who gave their hard earned money and trusted United Way to be
good stewards of their donations, the committees who do the work and, last, but definitely not least, the energetic and
supportive staff of United Way. This role as Chair has been a great experience, as well as a learning one, for me and that
is only accomplished as a team effort with everyone’s help and guidance. I have also been blessed with great leadership
of our various committee Chairs: David Brace with Community and Engagement Mobilization; Jill Van Beke with
Outcomes Based Investments; Suzanne Coile with Labor; Tiffany Carpenter with Branding & Messaging and the support
of our President, Ben Landers. Without their leadership, support and advice, we never would have accomplished all that
we were able to and for that, I am truly thankful.
I have enjoyed all my years with United Way of Greater Knoxville, from my first experience as a Loaned Executive to my
time as an Outcomes Based Investments Committee member several years ago to my two-year term as Board Chair. I
look forward to volunteering with this great organization for many years to come. And I look forward, as I am sure you
all do, to see what firsts we are able to accomplish in 2015. I close with a quote from Albert Pike, an American attorney
from the 1800s, which I feel is very appropriate for all, who said “What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us;
what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal.”
Sincerely,
Tommy Schmid
Tommy Schmid
Board Chair
Message from the Board Chair
2 United Way of Greater Knoxville
Tommy and Susan Schmid
4 United Way of Greater Knoxville
FOCUS AREAS
United Way of Greater Knoxville continues to help people by focusing on the building blocks to a
good life - Education, Income and Health. We also know that people depend on us to provide in
times of crisis or need, which is why we never lose sight of Basic Needs. By identifying needs and
setting attainable goals, we strive to be community solution innovators.
CREATING OPPORTUNITIES AND A GOOD LIFE FOR ALL BY FOCUSING ON:
+ +
HELPING CHILDREN, YOUTH
AND ADULTS
ACHIEVE POTENTIAL
• School readiness
• Academic achievement
• Productive and engaged youth
PROMOTING FINANCIAL
STABILITY AND
INDEPENDENCE
• Stable employment and
access to job skills training
• Maximized income
• Adult literacy and life skills
• Financial assets for
long-term stability
• Food and clothing
• Shelter and utilities
IMPROVING PEOPLE’S
HEALTH
• Maternal health and infant
well-being
• Healthy lifestyle behaviors
• Healthcare coverage and
preventative healthcare
• Mental health
• Emergency services
• Critical support services
VISION MISSION
WHY FOCUS ON EDUCATION, INCOME, AND HEALTH?
Better Lives.
Better Communities.
United Way of Greater Knoxville brings
together resources to improve the
lives of people in our community by
helping them achieve their potential
for self-sufficiency.
Everyone deserves opportunities to have a good life: a quality education that leads to a stable
job, enough income to support a family through retirement, and good health. Advancing the
common good is less about helping one person at a time and more about changing systems to
help all of us. We are all connected and interdependent. We all win when a child succeeds in
school, when families are financially stable, when people are healthy. United Way’s goal is to
create long-lasting changes by addressing the underlying cause of these problems.
To LIVE UNITED means being a part of the change. It takes everyone in the community working
together to create a brighter future.
In Knox County it costs
$97,988
Per Year
to incarcerate a youth.
United Way funds programs to keep kids in
school and off the streets.
Children are
engaged in our
community in non-
academic civic and
volunteer activities.
Elementary students are prepared to succeed
in middle school and middle school students
are prepared to succeed in high school.
The gap between low and
high performing students
is narrowed.
Students
enter school
developmentally
on track and are
proficient in needed
literary skills.
Students are prepared to
succeed as productive and
engaged young adults beyond
high school.
EDUCATION GOALS 2014
Students demonstrate at
least one-grade level of
academic growth each year.
SCHOOL
*
6 United Way of Greater Knoxville
Ad

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annual_report_2014_1

  • 1. $13,003,285 97 100,000 In 2014 2014Annual Report United Way of Greater Knoxville’s &2013 Leaders In Giving TO HELP CITIZENS BY FUNDING WAS DONATED COMMUNITY PROGRAMS
  • 2. I n 2014, United Way of Greater Knoxville experienced several firsts for this 93 year old organization. Under the leadership of our Campaign Chair, Randy Boyd, we exceeded a historic goal of $13,000,000! The room was electric when he announced the victory, with the help of his little brother, Jojo. Further proving that he is truly a visionary, Randy incorporated a transformational project within the campaign for the first time. He and his volunteers raised over more than $200,000 to support Helen Ross McNabb Center’s (HRMC) Homeless Veterans Supportive Housing Project. We were able to help HRMC finish the housing project so 20 homeless veterans now have a home to call their own. Another of Randy’s original ideas that he worked to achieve, was to ask a group of very generous donors to allocate their gifts to cover United Way’s operating costs. This allowed Randy and his volunteers to campaign to the public that 100% of their gift to United Way went straight to the deserving organizations we support through our grant-making process. Thanks to the Board of Directors, and the Branding & Messaging Committee led by Tiffany Carpenter, we hired an advertising agency, Mary Beth West Communications, to develop and implement a multi-channel communications and marketing plan. For the first time ever, United Way of Greater Knoxville purchased a broadcast media schedule. This project and several others were a result of our strategic planning process held in the fall of 2013 and the implementation of our five focus areas: raising more money, strengthening our community partnerships, connecting with our younger generation, increasing our awareness in the community and being transparent in all matters. I am thrilled to have been a part of this organization during this year of historic firsts. It is hard to believe my two year term as United Way of Greater Knoxville’s Board Chair has come to a close, as it seems like I just started yesterday. I want to thank the Board of Directors for their support, the hundreds of volunteers who gave their time, talents and energy, the many donors who gave their hard earned money and trusted United Way to be good stewards of their donations, the committees who do the work and, last, but definitely not least, the energetic and supportive staff of United Way. This role as Chair has been a great experience, as well as a learning one, for me and that is only accomplished as a team effort with everyone’s help and guidance. I have also been blessed with great leadership of our various committee Chairs: David Brace with Community and Engagement Mobilization; Jill Van Beke with Outcomes Based Investments; Suzanne Coile with Labor; Tiffany Carpenter with Branding & Messaging and the support of our President, Ben Landers. Without their leadership, support and advice, we never would have accomplished all that we were able to and for that, I am truly thankful. I have enjoyed all my years with United Way of Greater Knoxville, from my first experience as a Loaned Executive to my time as an Outcomes Based Investments Committee member several years ago to my two-year term as Board Chair. I look forward to volunteering with this great organization for many years to come. And I look forward, as I am sure you all do, to see what firsts we are able to accomplish in 2015. I close with a quote from Albert Pike, an American attorney from the 1800s, which I feel is very appropriate for all, who said “What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal.” Sincerely, Tommy Schmid Tommy Schmid Board Chair Message from the Board Chair 2 United Way of Greater Knoxville
  • 4. 4 United Way of Greater Knoxville FOCUS AREAS United Way of Greater Knoxville continues to help people by focusing on the building blocks to a good life - Education, Income and Health. We also know that people depend on us to provide in times of crisis or need, which is why we never lose sight of Basic Needs. By identifying needs and setting attainable goals, we strive to be community solution innovators. CREATING OPPORTUNITIES AND A GOOD LIFE FOR ALL BY FOCUSING ON: + + HELPING CHILDREN, YOUTH AND ADULTS ACHIEVE POTENTIAL • School readiness • Academic achievement • Productive and engaged youth PROMOTING FINANCIAL STABILITY AND INDEPENDENCE • Stable employment and access to job skills training • Maximized income • Adult literacy and life skills • Financial assets for long-term stability • Food and clothing • Shelter and utilities IMPROVING PEOPLE’S HEALTH • Maternal health and infant well-being • Healthy lifestyle behaviors • Healthcare coverage and preventative healthcare • Mental health • Emergency services • Critical support services
  • 5. VISION MISSION WHY FOCUS ON EDUCATION, INCOME, AND HEALTH? Better Lives. Better Communities. United Way of Greater Knoxville brings together resources to improve the lives of people in our community by helping them achieve their potential for self-sufficiency. Everyone deserves opportunities to have a good life: a quality education that leads to a stable job, enough income to support a family through retirement, and good health. Advancing the common good is less about helping one person at a time and more about changing systems to help all of us. We are all connected and interdependent. We all win when a child succeeds in school, when families are financially stable, when people are healthy. United Way’s goal is to create long-lasting changes by addressing the underlying cause of these problems. To LIVE UNITED means being a part of the change. It takes everyone in the community working together to create a brighter future.
  • 6. In Knox County it costs $97,988 Per Year to incarcerate a youth. United Way funds programs to keep kids in school and off the streets. Children are engaged in our community in non- academic civic and volunteer activities. Elementary students are prepared to succeed in middle school and middle school students are prepared to succeed in high school. The gap between low and high performing students is narrowed. Students enter school developmentally on track and are proficient in needed literary skills. Students are prepared to succeed as productive and engaged young adults beyond high school. EDUCATION GOALS 2014 Students demonstrate at least one-grade level of academic growth each year. SCHOOL * 6 United Way of Greater Knoxville
  • 7. * United Way of Greater Knoxville continues to work to improve support for education in our community. We believe all children have the right to a strong start so they can be successful in learning and in life. Our focus is on three crucial stages in an individual’s education development: 1) readiness to succeed in school, 2) academic achievement to succeed in later grades and 3) producing productive and engaged young adults ready to enter the work force and/or continued educational opportunities. Note for page 6: infographic represents intended education results for the upcoming year. Source: Boys and Girls Clubs of the Tennessee Valley. http://www.bgctnv.org/site/DocServer/Boys___Girls_Clubs_of_the_Tennessee_Valley.pdf?docID=601 FUNDED PROGRAM 2014 Grant The ARC of Knox County Sunshine Early Intervention $30,000 Arnstein Jewish Community Center Teen Adventure Program $5,686 Big Brothers Big Sisters of East Tennessee One to One Mentoring $90,000 Boy Scouts of America, Greater Smoky Mtn. Council Scouting Outreach $150,000 Boys & Girls Clubs of the Tennessee Valley Life Skills Program $100,000 Project Learn: The Educational Enhancement Program $172,796 Catholic Charities/University of Tennessee University-Assisted Community School $70,000 The Children’s Center Tuition Assistance for Certificate/Scholarship $68,000 Emerald Youth Foundation Emerging Leaders Education and Life Skills $100,000 First Tee of Greater Knoxville First Tee Learning Center $40,000 FUNDED PROGRAM 2014 Grant The Florence Crittenton Agency Child and Parenting Skills $24,000 New Pathways Academy $10,000 Girl Scout Council of the Southern Appalachians Girl Scout Leadership Experience $150,000 Great Schools Partnership First Grade Reading Intervention Program $232,975 Helen Ross McNabb Center Great Starts Nursery $25,000 LIFE Afterschool Program $25,000 Personal Child Safety Education $21,340 Metropolitan Drug Commission Alternative School Outreach Accelerated Reader $20,000 Wesley House Community Center After School/C.A.R.E.S. $70,000 Summer/S.T.E.P. $30,000 YMCA School Age Child Care $130,000 Teen Leadership $28,063 YWCA YWCA Youth Programming $254,140
  • 8. INCOME AND BASIC NEEDS 2014 Last year in Knox County, more than 15,000 people needed financial stabilization support to keep their homes and feed their families. United Way lends a hand. 510 United Way Color Specifications 14,508 individuals increased their technology, vocational, or employability skills. individuals received needed assistance for support such as clothing, rent, utilities and transportation allowing their living conditions to stabilize. 11,522 = individuals who had access to basic needs support. 411individuals earned a GED certificate or completion of a high school diploma in a nontraditional classroom setting. 397individuals were able to obtain permanent housing with support. 3,467 = individuals who received long-term financial stability . * 8 United Way of Greater Knoxville
  • 9. United Way of Greater Knoxville believes everyone deserves the benefits of financial stability. When individuals and families have savings, they are able to make informed financial decisions and they are prepared to handle unforeseen emergencies. They have peace of mind knowing they are in control of their own life situation. FUNDED PROGRAM 2014 GRANT The American Red Cross, Tennessee Mtn. Valley Disaster Services $215,500 Nursing Education Services $95,000 Service to Armed Forces $110,675 The ARC of Knox County Independent Living $18,000 Sunshine Industries $18,000 Community Action Committee–Office on Aging Homeless Prevention and Rehousing $46,607 SCIRS/Information and Referral $38,000 East Tennessee Technology Access Center Tech: Assist for People with Disabilities $100,000 Family Promise Interfaith Hospitality Network $38,000 Friends of Literacy Adult Literacy $66,000 Next Step Phase 2: Beyond the GED $12,000 Goodwill Industries** FUNDED PROGRAM 2014 GRANT Knox County Schools/PTA Clothing Center PTA Clothing Center $45,000 Knoxville Area Urban League Homeownership and Foreclosure Prevention $58,145 Workforce Development $102,758 Ladies of Charity Emergency Assistance $47,500 Peninsula Behavioral Health Independent Living $68,000 The Salvation Army Emergency Assistance $145,000 Operation Bootstrap/Men’s Shelter $131,000 Volunteer Ministry Center Bush Family Refuge $30,000 Resource Center $80,000 YWCA Transitional Housing $103,362 *Source: http://vmcinc.org/Homeless%20Coalition_2014_Biennial_Study.pdf Page 8 Infographic Source: Results are from the Biannual Outcome Reports submitted by funded agencies. ** Receives donor designation only
  • 10. * HEALTH AND BASIC NEEDS 2014 In Knox County, 49,929 people lived with a disability between 2008-2012. United Way helps them find stability and hope. 11,916 3,734 individuals increased their access to nutritious food. individuals experienced a safer home and community with reduced rates of violent crime, addictions, and accidental death. 5,215 = individuals who received emergency or critical support. 2,703 individuals improved their health by reducing risk factors for obesity, chronic disease and premature death. 29,659individuals were prepared for an emergency or disaster. 8,940 = individuals who received affordable health care services. 10 United Way of Greater Knoxville
  • 11. FUNDED PROGRAM 2014 GRANT Agape Therapeutic Residential Halfway House $51,000 The American Red Cross, Tennessee Mtn. Valley Community Preventative Health Education $155,703 The ARC of Knox County Beta Home $44,700 Sunshine Leisure Services $27,500 Boys & Girls Clubs of The Tennessee Valley Childcare Food $147,796 Prevention $98,700 Healthy Lifestyles $91,102 CASA of East Tennessee Training Citizen Advocates for Abused and Neglected Children $40,000 Catholic Charities Columbus Group Home $32,940 Samaritan Place $10,723 Cerebral Palsy Center Day Services $237,350 Cerebral Palsy Housing Corporation Group Home $34,075 FUNDED PROGRAM 2014 GRANT Childhelp, Inc. Childhelp Children’s Center of East Tennessee $32,500 Community Action Committee- Office on Aging Mobile Meals $150,000 East Tennessee Children’s Hospital Rehabilitation Center Motor Development Services $11,000 Speech and Language Services $50,000 East Tennessee Kidney Foundation Dialysis Transportation Program $54,600 Emerald Youth Foundation Emerald Youth Sports $50,000 Epilepsy Foundation Client Services $40,000 The First Tee of Greater Knoxville First Tee Life Skills Experience $19,826 The Florence Crittenton Agency Crittenton Residential Services $90,000 Great Schools Partnership Community Schools $50,000 continued on next page *Source: United States Census Bureau’s 2008-2012 American Community Survey Five-Year Estimates http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=bkmk Page 10 Infographic Source: Results are based on a 6-month time period and are from the Biannual Outcome Reports submitted by funded agencies.
  • 12. HEALTH AND BASIC NEEDS 2014 continued FUNDED PROGRAM 2014 GRANT Helen Ross McNabb Center Connections In-Home Family Preservation $94,500 Continuum for Permanent Services $63,000 Family Crisis Center $72,560 Great Starts $37,218 Parent Place $35,190 Partners for Child Abuse Prevention $46,800 Project Against the Sexual Abuse of Children $73,800 Pleasantree Apartments $42,300 ReDirections Adolescent Alcohol & Drug Services $4,725 Sexual Assault Advocacy $34,920 Therapeutic Preschool $85,500 Therapy Center $49,500 Transitional Living $21,600 InterFaith Health Clinic Healthcare for the Working Uninsured $165,000 Knoxville Academy of Medicine Foundation Knoxville Area Project Access $29,825 Knoxville Volunteer Emergency Rescue Squad Rescue and Safety Services $108,000 Legal Aid of East Tennessee Legal Aid Domestic Violence Program $131,693 FUNDED PROGRAM 2014 GRANT Mental Health Association Client Services $45,000 Education $55,000 The Salvation Army Joy Baker Center/Women’s Shelter $69,000 Second Harvest Food Bank Healthy Food Initiative $60,930 Senior Citizens Home Assistance Service Homemaker Program $128,000 Home Hair Care Program $5,000 Southeastern Housing Foundation Flenniken Landing Service Coordination $35,000 Wesley House Community Center Senior Citizens/W.I.S.E. $8,000 YMCA Community Health and Wellness $71,000 Community Gardens $5,000 YMCA Aquatics and Safety $19,000 YWCA Club W $53,500 Victim Advocacy $52,277 We believe that health encompasses body and mind. This is why United Way of Greater Knoxville funds programs that assist with physical and mental health. Our supported programs address issues such as pediatric rehabilitation, health insurance for the working uninsured, mental health, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, elder care, developmental disabilities, and substance abuse. 12 United Way of Greater Knoxville
  • 14. UNITED WAY OF GREATER KNOXVILLE, INC. AND ITS OPERATING DIVISIONS Statements of Financial Position March 31, 2014 and 2013 ASSETS Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents $ 10,927,905 $ 10,296,991 Restricted cash 134,996 89,927 Certificates of deposit 2,788,460 2,540,870 Pledges receivable (net of allowance for uncollectible pledges of $2,754,341 and $3,028,685 for 2014 and 2013, respectively) 6,366,251 6,767,039 Prepaid items and other current assets 47,368 41,329 Receivable from related parties 69,382 62,139 Total current assets 20,334,362 19,798,295 Property and equipment, net 2,785,258 2,741,347 Other Assets Beneficial interest in assets held by others - endowment 5,630,862 5,084,943 Total assets $ 28,750,482 $ 27,624,585 LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS Current Liabilities Allocations payable $ 7,197,075 $ 6,796,968 Amounts designated by donors to specific organizations 1,634,561 2,198,517 Accounts payable and accrued expenses 74,068 37,993 Total current liabilities 8,905,704 9,033,478 Net Assets Unrestricted Board designated 10,581,593 9,790,108 Undesignated 6,951,971 6,501,056 Temporarily restricted 294,748 294,748 Permanently restricted 2,016,466 2,005,195 Total net assets 19,844,778 18,591,107 Total liabilities and net assets $ 28,750,482 $ 27,624,585 United Way of Greater Knoxville, Inc. (UWGK) is a not-for-profit exempt from income tax as under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code and provides supporting services and other assistance to public and private agencies and community organizations to meet the human services needs of the general public of Knox County. UWGK is a local organization governed by a local board of directors and operates under charitable solicitation permits issued by the City of Knoxville (33P) and the State of Tennessee (26). UWGK may deduct up to 6% of collected pledges for administrative costs for processing and distributing gifts, and up to 13% for fundraising costs. UWGK pays annual dues of 1.15% to United Way Worldwide and United Way of Tennessee. ACCOUNTING TO THE COMMUNITY 2014 2013 14 United Way of Greater Knoxville
  • 15. 2014 Temporarily Permanently Unrestricted Restricted Restricted Total 2013 Total Campaign revenue, support and other Campaign revenue Campaign results $ 12,028,014 $ - $ - $ 12,028,014 $ 12,499,120 Less amounts designated by donors to specific organizations ( 2,086,305) - - ( 2,086,305) ( 2,189,335) Less provision for uncollectible pledges receivable ( 759,822) - - ( 759,822) (680,181) Net campaign revenue 9,181,887 - - 9,181,887 9,629,604 Support and other Change in beneficial interest in assets held by others 534,648 11,271 545,919 480,590 Rental income 94,016 - - 94,016 94,016 Donated in-kind services 93,620 - - 3,620 293,103 Management fee income 83,658 - - 83,658 77,296 Other contributions 38,117 - - 38,117 19,700 Interest income 18,923 - - 18,923 22,753 Program service fees 3,345 - - 3,345 1,990 Miscellaneous income (expense) 1,105 - - 1,105 (1,170) Grant income 1,561 - - 1,561 3,117 Total support and other 868,993 - 11,271 880,264 991,395 Total campaign revenue, support and other 10,050,880 - 11,271 10,062,151 10,620,999 Allocations and functional expenses Allocations Allocations and designations 8,881,699 - - 8,881,699 9,009,484 Less amounts designated by donors to specific organizations ( 2,086,305) - - ( 2,086,305) (2,189,335) Net allocations 6,795,394 - - 6,795,394 6,820,149 Functional expenses Program services 334,693 - - 334,693 332,756 Support services 1,678,393 - - 1,678,393 1,772,903 Total functional expenses 2,013,086 - - 2,013,086 2,105,659 Total allocations and functional expenses 8,808,480 - - 8,808,480 8,925,808 Change in net assets 1,242,400 - 11,271 1,253,671 1,695,191 Net assets at the beginning of the year 16,291,164 294,748 2,005,195 18,591,107 16,895,916 Net assets at the end of the year $ 17,533,564 $ 294,748 $ 2,016,466 $ 19,844,778 $ 18,591,107 Statements of Activities Years Ended March 31, 2014 and 2013
  • 16. Under the leadership of Randy Boyd, the 2014 Campaign Chair, we raised the historic amount of $13,003,285 for the community. United Way of Greater Knoxville will grant these funds to more than 100 programs that work to help people gain self-sufficiency. 1 We raised $13M 2014 ACCOMPLISHMENTS These programs work to: ensure children get an education and are ready for college, vocational school or to join the workforce; help people learn how to manage money so they can have financial stability, which leads to owning a home, providing for their family, and enjoying a good quality of life; help people improve their health by decreasing the number of babies born with health problems, reducing rates of violent crime, addictions and accidental deaths, and reducing risks of obesity and chronic disease, and ensure people have access to healthcare. 2014 Campaign Chair, Randy Boyd, and his “little brother” Jojo present the 2014 Campaign Total 16 United Way of Greater Knoxville
  • 17. 2 We funded a veterans housing project Thanks to the innovation of 2014 Campaign Chair, Randy Boyd, we raised more than $200,000 to help fund the Helen Ross McNabb Center’s (HRMC) Homeless Veterans Supportive Housing Project. And thanks to our community’s generosity, United Way of Greater Knoxville was able to help HRMC complete this project and provide homes for 23 (formerly) homeless veterans. These folks served our country and we are proud to work with HRMC to serve them. Randy Boyd and Jerry Vagnier, President of HRMC, attend the ribbon cutting for HRMC’s Homeless Veterans Housing Project
  • 18. CodeTN is a computer programming initiative that connects high school students to an engaging, real-world environment in which they are challenged to create web applications that solve problems. United Way of Greater Knoxville partnered with the Great Schools Partnership and Pellissippi State Community College on the inaugural CodeTN competition. The competition consisted of 26 student teams, 23 faculty sponsors and a private sector “Tech-Pro.” Each team of high school coders worked with their tech mentor and teacher sponsor to produce a dynamic web application that addressed a student-identified problem. Projects ranged from tracking user specific data on immunization records to calculating the cost effectiveness of solar panel installations. The top teams presented their projects to a panel of judges on November 20th at the Knoxville Convention Center. The grand prize was $5,000 for the winning team’s classroom and $500 Apple gift cards for the winning team’s members. In the end, Bearden High School took home the inaugural prize with their Eruditio Scholarship Engine, which specifically targeted regional SEC scholarship opportunities for students in East Tennessee. 3 We sponsored CodeTN 2014 ACCOMPLISHMENTS CodeTN’s winning team awarded with the $5,000 grand prize 18 United Way of Greater Knoxville
  • 19. 4 We hired a public relations company Thanks to our Board of Directors, we were able to hire Mary Beth West Communications (MBWC) to help us tell our story. In addition to the in-kind media coverage that we have always received from our generous local media partners, we were able to add additional television, radio, print, and digital advertisements to our schedule. With the combination of paid and in-kind media, we were able to implement awareness efforts designed to reach specific target audiences. One of several UWGK newspaper ads developed by the MBWC team.
  • 20. The Alexis De Tocqueville Society represents a group of community minded individuals contributing $10,000 or more to United Way of Greater Knoxville each year. In 2014, Alexis de Tocqueville Society Co-chairs Jim Haslam and Sharon Pryse and Campaign Chair Randy Boyd were instrumental in increasing membership by 10 new members for a 7.8% increase over last year. Within the Women of Tocqueville Society, there were 6 new donors for an 11.8% increase over last year. This group comprises more than 20% of the Annual Campaign. 5 We grew our Tocqueville Society 2014 ACCOMPLISHMENTS In November of 2014, Alexis De Tocqueville Society members enjoyed a private concert from Alison Krauss, Dan Tyminski and Jeff White. They are pictured above with 2014 Campaign Chair Randy Boyd, his wife Jenny Boyd and son Harrison Boyd. 20 United Way of Greater Knoxville
  • 21. The Alliance for Better Nonprofits (ABN) will be a clearinghouse connecting the nonprofits of East Tennessee with the training, consulting, and services they need to grow stronger. It is a membership organization that will open in the fall of 2015. The UWGK played a vital role in 2014 by providing substantial early support for this program. The UWGK believes the ABN will be a critical link in assisting local nonprofits to improve their capacity, resulting in a greater impact for our region. UWGK contributed funding to aid in the purchase and renovation of the former Regas Restaurant (pictured below) as the future home of the ABN and will also provide program funding, along with other donors, for the first five years of operation. 6 We collaborated with The Alliance for Better Nonprofits (ABN)
  • 22. 7 We helped create Volunteer Knoxville In 2014, United Way of Greater Knoxville was instrumental in creating our region’s new volunteer center, Volunteer Knoxville. UWGK has held the national HandsOn Network relationship through the Points of Light Foundation that connects volunteers and nonprofit program needs. A local citizens group that included representatives from Leadership Knoxville petitioned UWGK for reassignment of the HandsOn Network franchise. An agreement was secured and in less than six months the new center was serving our region. Volunteer Knoxville inspires, equips and mobilizes volunteers to take action that changes the East Tennessee region. The website: volunteerknoxville.org easily connects community volunteers to volunteer opportunities at local agencies. Volunteer Knoxville offices are currently housed at UWGK, who is happy to have aided in the vital start up. 2014 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 22 United Way of Greater Knoxville
  • 24. VOLUNTEER LEADERSHIP BOARD OF DIRECTORS Tommy Schmid, Chair Kristy Altman Allie Arnette Sara Baker Patrick Birmingham Randy Boyd David Brace Jack Brundige Tiffany Carpenter Suzanne Coile Oslo Cole Santiago Cuccarese Becky Dodson Jennifer Evans Melissa Feinbaum Bruce Foster* Christopher Fuller Cynthia Gibson Jill Green Kim Guy Mike Hammond Russell Harris III Ted Heinig Mille Hodge Dale Keasling* Bob Kesling Larry Kleinman Ben Landers Joe Landsman Jeff Lee* Goldie Littlejohn Greg Marret Linda Milan Kimberly Mitchell Anthony Moulden Brandon Parks N.J. Pesci Alex Ponzio Michael Reynolds Susanna Sutherland Becky Thompson Rosalyn Tillman Chris Van Beke Jill Van Beke Jason Woodle BRANDING & MESSAGING COMMITTEE LEADERSHIP CABINET CAMPAIGN CABINET Tiffany Carpenter, Chair Cathy Amos Kyndra Brewer Dino Cartwright Doug Kose Kara McFarland Melanie Morris Becky Thompson Tim Wirtz Jim Haslam, Co-Chair Sharon Pryse, Co-Chair Bert Bertelkamp Randy Boyd Joan Cronan Pam Fansler Jimmy Haslam Jennifer Holder Raja Jubran Dale Keasling Joe Landsman Rodney Lawler Jeff Lee David Martin Mintha Roach Andy Shafer Wes Stowers Randy Boyd, Chair Grant Boyd Tim Burchett Chris Chandler Suzanne Coile Kelli Cruess Abby Ham Steve Harmon Dee Haslam Jim Haslam Don Hasson Buddy Heins Hallerin Hilton Hill Jeff Lee Vanessa Macko Katie McHargue Amy Miles Alvin Nance Brandon Parks Nick Pavlis Sharon Pryse Rich Ray Madeline Rogero Dane Scism Tracy Thompson Crystal Washington Tim Young COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT & MOBILIZATION COMMITTEE David Brace, Chair Kristy Altman Sara Baker Becky Dodson Jennifer Evans Heather Fielden Harry Gross Linda Milan Michael Reynolds Susanna Sutherland Tommy Schmid Rosalyn Tillman Jason Woodle LABOR PARTICIPATION COMMITTEE Suzanne Coile, Chair Sam Alexander Jason Andrews Charlene Burt Mary Crider Chuck Fletcher Kim Guy Kimberly Mitchell James Morrow Anthony Moulden Tim Tate *Non-voting members 24 United Way of Greater Knoxville
  • 25. BUILDING TRADE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Buddy Heins, Chair Matt Chambers Chris Clark Dennis Dockery Randy Fields Steve Fritts Mike George Bart Jenkins Jeff Johnson Bill Kennedy Joe Ledford Dick McGill Lynn Musick Ron Perfetto Frank Rothermel Bob Slack LOANED EXECUTIVES Kyle Baisley Ben Barnett Danielle Benson Jake Bishop Pamela Bomkamp Drema Bowers Laura Brittingham Shanna Browning Jacob Bryant Bradden Cannon Bobby Colwick Linda Cox-Collier Nathaniel Davis Becky Dodson Monica Flatford Nate Hair Rebecca Holmes Jared Hubbard Chad Hulette Ashley Humphrey Shane Jackson Russ Jensen Suzanne Kieltyka Jacob Kulhanek Shelly Lohmann Samantha Lord Susan Loveday Rachel McCoig Paige McDaniel Stephanie McKenzie Sarah McNally Kim Miller Kelly Morgan Drew Nelson Laura Rathbone Kristin Reed Kassandra Richardson Jenny Swanson Jessica Union Heather Willis Steve Winfree Stacy Woodard Tim Wroblewski MONDAY FOUNDATION Dale Keasling, Chair George Wallace, Grants and Awards Chair Jim Hart Jim Haslam II Greg McWhorter Gene Monday III Butch Peccolo Andy Shafer Bo Shafer Lee Ann Furrow Tolsma Monday Family Members: Bob Monday Gene Monday III Jimmy Monday Will Monday NOMINATING COMMITTEE Oslo Cole, Chair Danielle Benson Jennifer Evans Caleb Fristoe Ben Landers Alex Ponzio Tommy Schmid Susanna Sutherland Rosalyn Tillman OPERATIONS COMMITTEE Jill Van Beke, Chair Oslo Cole Heather Fielden Linda Glasgow Bryan Harper Leslye Hartsell Bill Kelso Jean Martinez Mike Martin Jason McGaha Melanie Morris Carrie O’Rear Chad Schollaert Charles Sells Ashley Shaffer Ben Sharbel Traci Taylor John Thurman Chris Van Beke Dean Vance Catherine Williams Michelle Wilson Amber Young Greg Marret, Chair David Arning Melissa Feinbaum Kevin Fillers Millie Hodge Joe Landsman Tracy Liverman Bob Parker Charles Purkey Tommy Schmid Rosalyn Tillman OUTCOMES BASED INVESTMENT COMMITTEE
  • 26. VOLUNTEER LEADERSHIP Jerry Adams Rebecca Ashford Brian Bailey Richard Bayer Kim Beets Richard Bettis Robert Blazer Tyler Boldin Kimberly Bozich Connie Brace Lea Bradley Lawrence Brewer Jason Brooks Brian Browning Rick Buchanan Terrell Burkhart Deborah Campbell Brent Carr Lindsay Cates Oslo Cole Bob Colwick Jeremy Cook Alisa Coppock Michele Cox John Curry Hayley Debusk Molly Deuschle Jack Dixon Becky Dodson Bryan Dove Donna Downen Amber Edwards Heather Fielden Suzanne Fischer Leslie Frazier Diane Gardner Ann Giffin Linda Glasgow Nathan Goodner Joseph Gouffon Denise Gough Charles Gray Jill Green Johney Green, Jr. Alicia Griego Lucille Griffo John Gross Brandon Hackett Stephanie Halouma Bryan Harper Russell Harris III Carol Hart Leslye Hartsell Michael Hatmaker Tracy Hayes Lisa Higginbotham James Hinton Justin Hodge Hurtis Hodges John Homa Michael Honeycutt Andrea Hurst Ewing Johnson Courtney Jones James Jones Karen Kakanis Eric Keener Jamie Keith Andrew King Jacque Kitts Larry Kleinman Johan Larsen Jan Larson Nicholas Lawrence Herc Ligdis Daniel Linehan Deadrick Loveday Janna Lowther Shannon Loyd William MacGrath Laurie Macnair James Malia Elba Marshall Michael Martin Jean Martinez William Mason Rochelle Mayes Terence McClunie, Sr. Jason McGaha Terri McGuire Ryan Mefford Christopher Miller Emily Miller Harriet Miller Sanford Miller Melanie Morris Amy Morton Nate Naugle Mike North Russell Nunley Carrie O’Rear Laura Owens Amy Pangelinan Suzanne Prince Kevin Przewrocki Sasha Ragsdale Erin Read Keely Ritchie Colin Ross Pennie Rushing Tim Ryan Chad Schollaert Greg Schrimsher Deborah Schriver Stacy Schuettler Blake Scott Charles Sells Ashley Shaffer Ben Sharbel Kayla Simonian Debbie Smith Kristi Sowards Chris Spain Brian Strong Traci Taylor Richard Thomas Robin Thomas Brooke Thurman John Thurman Sheadrick Tillman Emily Tirgrath Shane Trent Ellen Trusty Amy Underwood Chris Van Beke Jill Van Beke OUTCOMES BASED INVESTMENT VOLUNTEERS 26 United Way of Greater Knoxville
  • 27. Dean Vance Kasey Vatter Thomas Vester III Patricia Watson Diane Wear Nick Weissfeld Claudeane Whaley Steve Wiggins Catherine Williams Elnora Williams Erven Williams Jessica Williams Ashley Wilson Michelle Wilson Nick Wilson Jason Woodle Sylvia Woods Chris Wright Amber Young Allie Arnette, Chair Andrew Almond Ainsley Baggott Cody Bancroft John Bellenfant Connor Boyce Jordan Casady Elias Cedeno David Clark Amelia Conner Addie Davis Abby Finnegan Feroza Freeland Savannah Fulmer Maggie Henderson Tennille Kent Braden McClure Scotty McClure Ashton Monks Hayley Mull Wayne Nash Elizabeth Nichols Caroline Qualls Katie Rall Becca Roberts Josh Schueller Kendall Selsor Stacia Stonebrook Alaina Wood Richard Hall, Chair Carol Baker Charles Gibson Paula A. Gibson Robert Jarnagin Julie Rex Elaine Smith Carl Scott Tipton ORGANIZED LABOR UNITED WAY OF JEFFERSON COUNTY Advisory Board UNITED WAY OF LOUDON COUNTY Advisory Board Andy Ewing, Chair Steve Geoffrey Susan Gross Shirley Hall Mary Hardin Morris Hassler Debbie Henry Tammy Lane Sam Marcy Kim McGimsey Ruth Henderson McQueen Steve Meadows Tim Crowe Adam Waller Executive Advisory Board Joy Littleton Bill Oden Harvey Sproul UNITED WAY OF UNION COUNTY Advisory Board Martin Shafer, Chair Alex (Bo) Shafer UNITED WAY OF GRAINGER COUNTY Advisory Board Charlie Hemphill, Chair Chandra Blanken Karen Bourgeois Jill Cabbage Mary Erwin Michael K. Ishmael Edwin Jarnagin Marty Mansfield Donna Mayes Wendy Noe Woody Roach George ShirleyUNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE UWGK STUDENT GROUP AFL-CIO Organizing Department American Federation of Government, Locals 2400, 3509 Atomic Trades and Labor Council Amalgamated Transist Union, Local 1164 Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees Division/of IBT Communication Workers of America, Local 3805 Communication Workers of America Retirees, Local 3805 Democratic Women of Knoxville Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 2 Greater Smoky Mountain American Postal Workers Union, Local 263 Heat and Frost Insulators, Local 52 IATSE-Wardrobe Workers, Local 894 Insulators and Allied Workers, Local 46 International Association of Fire Fighters, Locals 1 and 2
  • 28. VOLUNTEER LEADERSHIP Bertelkamp Automation, Inc. East Tennessee Children’s Hospital Realty Trust Group SILVER MEETING SPONSORS International Association of Iron Workers, Local 384 International Association of Machinists, Local 480 International Association of Operating Engineers, Local 900 International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Local 453 International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Locals 270, 365, 760, 1323 International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Local 519 International Chemical Workers Union Locals 252C, 715C International Union of Painters and Allied Trades, Locals 437, 1805 Jobs with Justice of East Tennessee Knox County Education Association Knoxville Building and Construction Trades Council Knoxville Fire Fighters Association, Local 65 Knoxville Newspaper Guild Knoxville-Oak Ridge Area Central Labor Council Laborers’ International Union of North America, Locals 818, 1210 Mailers, Local M83 National Association of Letter Carriers, Local 419 Office and Professional Employees International Union, Local 144, 2001 Operative Plasterers and Cement Masons, Local 78 Sheet Metal Workers International Association, Local 5 Sheet Metal, Air, Rail and Transportation Union United Association of Plumbers and Pipe Fitters, Locals 102, 718 United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, Local 50 United Campus Workers/CWA United Food and Commercial Workers, Local 1995 United Steelworkers of America, Local 90, 309 Workers United First Tennessee Randy Boyd Shafer Insurance Agency, Inc. U.S. Cellular PLATINUM MEETING SPONSORS Edfinancial GOLD MEETING SPONSORS Covenant Health Farmers Mutual of Tennessee Hodges, Doughty & Carson Home Federal Bank Regal Entertainment Group Stowers Machinery Corporation Summit Medical Group, PLLC The Trust Company of Knoxville WBIR-TV White Realty & Service Corporation BRONZE MEETING SPONSORS Boyd’s Jig & Reel (Platinum) Publix Stores (Gold) Scripps Networks Interactive, LLC (Silver) Home Depot Store 728 (Bronze) Regal Entertainment Group (Bronze) IN KIND DONATION 28 United Way of Greater Knoxville
  • 29. TOP CORPORATE PARTNERS 1. Pilot Flying J and Haslam Family 2. 21st Mortgage Corporation 3. Clayton Homes, Inc. and Clayton Family Foundation 4. Radio Systems Corporation and Boyd Family 5. Regal Entertainment Group and Regal Foundation 6. Scripps Networks Interactive 7. UT Battelle Oak Ridge National Laboratory 8. The University of Tennessee Knoxville 9. Covenant Health 10. Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC 11. Home Federal Bank 12. Knoxville Utilities Board 13. Kimberly-Clark Corporation 14. First Tennessee 15. Regions Financial Corporation 16. Lawler-Wood,LLC/Lawler-Wood Housing, LLC and Cornerstone Foundation 17. Publix Stores 18. University of Tennessee Medical Center 19. UPS and Teamsters Local 519 20. Dow Chemical Company 21. US Bank and Elavon 22. TeamHealth 23. Enterprise Rent-A-Car 24. Bertelkamp Automation, Inc. 25. Denark Construction Inc. 26. SunTrust Bank 27. WBIR-TV and Gannett Foundation 28. The Trust Company of Knoxville 29. East Tennessee Children’s Hospital 30. Knoxville News Sentinel and The E.W. Scripps Company 31. Knoxville City Government 32. Pershing Yoakley & Associates 33. House-Hasson Hardware and Charles S. Hasson Fund 34. Edfinancial 35. Kroger Stores and Kroger Foundation 36. Holston Gases, Inc. 37. AT&T 38. Stowers Machinery Corporation 39. Shafer Insurance Agency, Inc. 40. Tennova Healthcare 41. Comcast Cable Communications, Inc Comcast Foundation 42. Tennessee Valley Authority 43. K-VA-T Food Stores (Food City) 44. Alcoa, Inc. 45. Willis of Tennessee, Inc. 46. Knox County Schools 47. Rentenbach Constructors Incorporated 48. Martin & Company 49. URS / CH2M Oak Ridge 50. Pinnacle Financial Partners 51. Cellular Sales Management Group, LLC 52. Coldwell Banker Wallace & Wallace, Realtors 53. Provision Health Alliance 54. Norfolk Southern Foundation 55. Pugh CPAs 56. South College 57. Cumberland Securities Company, Inc. 58. Boys & Girls Clubs of the Tennessee Valley 59. AlcoPro 60. Beverage Control, Inc. 61. White Realty & Service Corporation 62. United Way of Greater Knoxville 63. Target Stores 64. BarberMcMurry architects 65. RIVR Media 66. CSL Plasma 67. FSG Bank, N. A. 68. Whirlpool Corporation and Whirlpool Foundation 69. Green Mountain Coffee Roasters 70. Johnson & Galyon, Inc. 71. WATE - TV6 72. Horne Properties, Inc. 73. The Chop House/Connors Steak and Seafood 74. ALSTOM Power, Inc. 75. Realty Trust Group 76. Arby’s Roast Beef Restaurants of Knoxville and Arby’s Foundation 77. ABSG Consulting Inc. 78. U.S. Cellular 79. WVLT Volunteer TV 80. Principle USA, Inc. 81. TIS Insurance Services, Inc. 82. Reily Foods-JFG Coffee Company 83. Helen Ross McNabb Center, Inc. 84. Blaine Construction Corporation 85. Moxley Carmichael 86. Aqua-Chem, Inc. 87. Legal Aid of East Tennessee 88. The Hollingsworth Companies 89. Summit Medical Group, PLLC 90. UBS Financial Services Inc. 91. Emerson Process Management 92. Mesa Associates 93. Raymond James 94. Rodefer Moss & Company 95. LBMC 96. Revenue Recovery Corporation 97. Knoxville Chamber 98. Mercedes-Benz of Knoxville 99. BB&T 100. Grayson Auto Group 101. DeRoyal Industries 102. Merit Construction, Inc. 103. AAA Tennessee 104. AMS Corporation 105. Fifth Third Bank and Fith Third Foundation 106. Cannon & Cannon, Inc. 107. EmployBridge 108. Jewelry Television (TM) 109. McCarty Holsaple McCarty Architects Inc. 110. Costco Wholesale 111. Messer Construction Company 112. Eagle Distributing Company 113. Pirate Girl PR LLC
  • 30. Ben Landers President and CEO Marie Alcorn Vice President/Community Engagement & Mobilization Donna Bell Administrative Assistant/Resource Development Debbie Black Manager/Labor Participation Alice Borden Director/Operations, Controller Jennifer Brooks Associate/Branding & Messaging Alex Brownfield Executive Director/Volunteer Knoxville Karen Byrd Administrative Assistant Becky Dockery Director/Leadership Giving and Individual Engagement Joanne Edmonds Associate/Leadership Giving and Individual Engagement Judy Fenton Regional Executive Director (Grainger, Jefferson, Loudon and Union Counties) Caleb Fristoe Manager/Community Outreach & Special Initiatives Dana Green Administrative Assistant/Community Engagement and Mobilization Leslie Grindstaff Director/Community Assessment and Planning Susan Hager Director/Resource Development Operations Cheryl Hair Senior Vice President/Operations Adam McCampbell Associate/New Business Development Jennifer McCarty Vice President/Branding & Messaging Michelle Sauls Manager/Operations Robert Sherrod Senior Director/Relationship Building & Administration Dana Smith Administrative Assistant/Operations Lauren Stewart Vice President/Resource Development Stephanie Ward Manager/Operations STAFF DIRECTORY 30 United Way of Greater Knoxville
  • 31. Dear United Way Believers: I say believers because if you are reading this, you likely support our mission of helping people achieve their potential for self sufficiency, and for that we thank you. Helping people achieve self-sufficiency is a daunting task; however we have chosen to act continuously to improve community conditions. We believe that everyone deserves to enjoy a good quality of life, and our dedicated volunteers work diligently and intentionally toward this goal. I believe the community support and leadership speaks to who we are as a region. United Way of Greater Knoxville seeks to improve community conditions for everyone by investing donated dollars in programs that get results in our core focus areas of education, income (financial stability,) and health. We believe these focus areas are the building blocks to a good life. And as we have for 93 years, we still provide basic needs for people in times of crisis. Money raised each year is granted to more than 95 local non-profit programs that help children prepare for, and succeed in school, help individuals and families learn how to manage money and build a savings, and assist people as they better their physical and emotional health. These are just a few of the goals we work toward to help improve our community’s conditions. Perhaps one of the greatest challenges this organization has faced in recent times is that of awareness. In 2014 we commissioned a market research study and learned that a significant number of area residents have no idea who we are or what we do. Several segments of our community did not have any opinion of our long-standing organization. In an effort to raise local awareness, we consulted with, and hired, a communications agency to guide our messaging and marketing efforts. This communications campaign launched December 2014, and targeted efforts are still underway as this report is released. We remain optimistic that our awareness focus will benefit our organization, and ultimately, the many people we serve. Please take time to visit us at uwgk.org to see all of the programs United Way of Greater Knoxville funds. All funding is done by community volunteers; United Way of Greater Knoxville is truly a community run organization. I want to thank the thousands of people in Knox County who choose United Way as their way to give back and serve. United Way understands our community’s needs and work to ensure that we are the most efficient way to care for so many diverse human service organizations. Please share our story and good work with others. Supporting United Way of Greater Knoxville is the best way to help the most people. Sincerely, Ben Landers Letter from the President
  • 32. 32 United Way of Greater Knoxville