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Leading Inclusive Meetings_Panel Discussion 122972.pptx

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Leading Inclusive Meetings_Panel Discussion 122972.pptx

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A variety of disabilities can impact the extent to which all attendees fully participate in a meeting or group discussion. However, organizational leaders are often unprepared to effectively orchestrate the contributions of those with diverse visual, auditory, sensory-motor, cognitive, and neurological needs. This session accepted for presentation at the 2022 conference of the Society for Industrial-Organizational Psychology intends to 1) raise awareness of how different disabilities and identities may be accommodated to yield a better meeting experience for all and 2) highlight facilitation methods, technology, and assistive tools that meeting leaders can use to conduct more inclusive meetings.

A variety of disabilities can impact the extent to which all attendees fully participate in a meeting or group discussion. However, organizational leaders are often unprepared to effectively orchestrate the contributions of those with diverse visual, auditory, sensory-motor, cognitive, and neurological needs. This session accepted for presentation at the 2022 conference of the Society for Industrial-Organizational Psychology intends to 1) raise awareness of how different disabilities and identities may be accommodated to yield a better meeting experience for all and 2) highlight facilitation methods, technology, and assistive tools that meeting leaders can use to conduct more inclusive meetings.

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Leading Inclusive Meetings_Panel Discussion 122972.pptx

  1. 1. Leading Inclusive Meetings: Tools and Techniques Virtual Live Panel Discussion Allen, J.A., Gibson., J.L., Kornblau, B.L., Praslova, L., Rodriguez, P.M., Santuzzi, A., Sylvester, A. (2022, April). Tools and Techniques for Leading Inclusive Meetings [Panel Presentation]. Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology Annual Conference, Seattle, WA.
  2. 2. Agenda • Focal Topics and Speakers – 25 minutes • Q&A – 25 minutes This session will be recorded. Please stay on mute unless called on by the presenters. Please use the chat feature for questions/comments, or the raise hand feature if you would like to share information or ask a question verbally.
  3. 3. Focal Topics and Speakers • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) promotion of accessible meetings for all disabilities (Barbara Kornblau) • Meeting facilitation techniques (Joe Allen) • Technology and assistive tools (Paul Rodriguez) • Inclusion considerations related to • Concealed disabilities (Alecia Santuzzi) • Neurodiversity (Ludmila Praslova) • Cognitive disabilities (Alice Sylvester)
  4. 4. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) - Promotion of Accessible Meetings for all Disabilities Barbara L. Kornblau, JD, OTR/L, FAOTA, DASPE, CCM. CDMS
  5. 5. Planning Accessible Meetings 1. Do an onsite visit to make sure your venue is accessible. Reach out to occupational therapy students and/or the ADA National Network Centers for assistance, if you need it. 2. When you announce your meeting and/or send invitations for your meeting, let attendees know how they can request reasonable accommodations to attend and/or have access to the meeting. 3. Include a checklist of potential accommodations in the meeting registration documents and/or webpage. 4. Download the American Bar Association, Commission in Disability Rights, (n.d.). Planning Accessible Meetings and Events - A Toolkit. It’s a free, detailed, step-by-step, how to, for accessible meeting planning. Includes very detailed information (on virtual and in-person meetings & events) 21 pages.
  6. 6. ADA Compliant Accessible Meeting Resources • ADA National Network. (2015). A planning guide for making temporary events accessible to people with disabilities. Retrieved from https://adata.org/guide/planning-guide-making-temporary-events- accessible-people-disabilities • American Bar Association, Commission in Disability Rights, (n.d.). Planning accessible meetings and events - a toolkit. Retrieved from https://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/administrative/commission-disability- rights/accessible-meetings-toolkit.pdf • American Bar Association, (July 01, 2021). Virtual meetings: accessibility checklist & best practices. Retrieved from https://www.americanbar.org/groups/diversity/disabilityrights/resources/covid- resources/virtual-meetings-checklist/ • Cornell University, Division of Human Resources. (2019). Accessible Meeting and Event Checklist. Retrieved from https://hr.cornell.edu/sites/default/files/documents/accessible_meeting_checklist.pdf • General Services Administration (GSA) & U.S. Access Board. (2022). Create accessible meetings. Retrieved from https://www.section508.gov/create/accessible-meetings
  7. 7. Meeting Facilitation Joseph A. Allen, PhD Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental
  8. 8. Meeting Facilitation = Enabling Participation • Addressing barriers to participation • Establishing participatory norms • Making sure everyone is seen and heard Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental
  9. 9. Facilitation for Virtual and Hybrid Meetings • Virtual meetings have some advantages and disadvantages • Hybrid meetings have the potential to be the most inclusive form of meeting • Engaging participation is still the key…
  10. 10. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND ACCESSIBLE MEETINGS DR PAUL RODRIGUEZ, OTR OTD
  11. 11. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY (AT) • Assistive technology can be viewed as an extension of the individual that allows for improved access to work, leisure, self-care and the environment. • Assistive technology is typically categorized into specific categories: Vision, Hearing, Communication, Mobility and Positioning, Learning and Cognition, Leisure, Environmental, Daily Living, Vehicle Modification, and Computer Access. • Assessment (completed by a Registered Occupational Therapist) is an important step in the process of determining the type of tools/approaches to recommend.
  12. 12. ASSESSMENT FACTORS FOR AT • Compatibility and scalability • Motor capabilities and strengths • Cognitive skills • Vision, Hearing, Speech • Cost and organizational need • Body mechanics (strength, range of motion, trunk control) • Space/location and environmental factors • Ergonomics, meaning and purpose are other important factors to consider for making the right fit for person/technology/situational factors.
  13. 13. TYPES OF AT • VISION- Large Print, Highlighted and screen contrast and color with factory settings or software to enhance, magnification tools and software (MAGIc, Windows), Text to speech, dictation software (Kurzweil, Balabolka) • HEARING- Live Transcribe, OTTER • PHYSICAL- Eye gaze, TUBUS ONE (utilization of a stylus held in mouth, used with limited upper extremity motor control), hand controls/switches to allow for screen and ZOOM manipulation, SIP n PUFF (utilizes air pressure via inhalation and exhalation of a straw device to manipulate due to limited upper extremity motor control) • Adapted keyboards/adapted hand controls depending on motor performance and abilities
  14. 14. APPROACHES FOR ACCESSIBLE VIRTUAL MEETINGS • Provide materials ahead of time, prior to meeting • Provide for a note taker, sign language interpreter as needed • Various vendors come with accessibility functions on their features that will allow for access to meetings and other organizational tools (closed captioning, voice to text, text to voice) • ASK….Make sure that all participants have access to effectively join the virtual meeting. • Clarify and confirm compatibility with participants and meeting
  15. 15. Invisible and Concealable Disabilities Anticipating individual differences that are not obvious Alecia M. Santuzzi Professor, Social-I/Ol Psychology Director, Research Methodology Services Northern Illinois University Email: asantuzzi@niu.edu 15
  16. 16. Disabilities in the Workplace • 62% invisible (Sherbin et al., 2017) • Disclosure required to use protections or accommodations, but … Qualifying Condition Self-Identify 30% 4% 16
  17. 17. Factors in Disclosure Rates Intrapersonal factors • Low or variable salience • Ambiguous symptoms • Relevance Social factors • Concerns about stigma/stereotypes Pachankis, 2007; Santuzzi, Waltz, Finkelstein, & Rupp, 2014 Baldridge & Veiga, 2006; Clair, Beatty, & MacLean, 2005; Quinn & Chaudoir, 2009; Quinn & Earnshaw, 2011 17
  18. 18. How to Reduce Identity Management Effort Intrapersonal (Low salience & strain) Disability Identity Management Social (Low stigma & High support) Situational Antecedents Environment Management Evaluate target personality & relationship Careful use of terminology Avoiding relevant situations Effortful control of symptoms 18
  19. 19. Facilitating Virtual Meetings: Neurodiveristy Ludmila N. Praslova, Ph.D.
  20. 20. Neurodiversity: One size fits none •Neurodiversity •Neurotypical and Neurodivergent •Neurodiverse •Differences: Sensory, Social, Processing •Meetings: Before, During, After
  21. 21. Facilitating Virtual Meetings For Individuals With Cognitive Disabilities By Dr. Alice Sylvester
  22. 22. Support Cognitive Oriented Tools Meeting Facilitation Magnification Applications Text to Speech Synthesizers Electronic Pointing Devices Key Board Filters Memory Cards Screen Reader Large Prints
  23. 23. Questions for the Panel 1. Audience questions 2. What are some of the tensions that exist between offering best practices for meeting leadership and inclusion goals? 3. What are some disabilities, identities, or needs that more people should be aware of in work organizations? 4. What advice related to inclusion do you have for meeting leaders? 5. What suggestions do you have for meeting leaders who want to meet attendees’ needs while also maintaining their privacy? 6. What are technological tools or assistive technologies that not enough people know about? 7. What do you see as some barriers to inclusion at work? 8. What are some small adjustments that meeting leaders should build into their habits and processes?

Editor's Notes

  • Formal disclosure of disability is critical to receiving protections/accommodations. It is also important for the employing organization to know in order to ensure proper policies/procedures are in place.

    However, data presented from a survey led by the Center for Talent Innovation suggested that formal disclosure rates in the workplace are much lower than the actual incidence of most impairments that might qualify as disabilities under the ADAAA (2008).

    Looking specifically at white collar workers in the U.S., their survey showed that approximately 30% of workers have qualifying conditions, yet only about 4% formally disclose disability.


    [less than 40% with disability disclosed to employer)
  • Why aren’t workers disclosing their disabilities?

    Recent research identifies reasons that fall into two broad categories – self/identity factors and social factors.

    Workers with disabilities might have ambiguity or variability in their own personal experiences with their impairments, leading them to question whether they should report them. Even if they are quite aware of the disability, they still might not disclose because they do not see the disability as relevant to their work.

    Expected or observed social reactions also affect decisions to disclose. Negative stereotypes about disability directly damage perceptions of worker competence, which can be especially damaging in performance domains like the workplace. Also, workers who need accommodations may experience stigma from co-workers who see accommodations as “extra help” and as unfair.

    Importantly, concerns about social reactions may influence the extent to which workers are willing to identify their impairments or conditions as “disabilities.”

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