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Education for Social Innovation - Session 1

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Education for Social Innovation - Session 1

  1. 1. Session One Education for Social Innovation What sparks our sense of wonder? Exploring Possibilities
  2. 2. Session One: Overview Exploring Possibilities Core Concepts and Essential Questions Social Innovation Project Examples Linking Projects with Curriculum Pedagogical Documentation Reflecting on your Essential Question
  3. 3. A shift in our focus...
  4. 4. 60 sec. Challenge 1. Find a partner within your cluster 2. Select an object in the room and place it on a table in front of you 3. You will need to make a list.
  5. 5. With your partner, generate a list of all the possible uses for your selected object. 60sec. GO
  6. 6. Core Concepts & Essential Questions A discussion on the core concepts of social innovation with reference to related videos and readings, discussion on failure and resiliency, creative tension, and a growth mindset. ● What is a social entrepreneur? ● What is social entrepreneurship?
  7. 7. What is a Social Entrepreneur? Social entrepreneurs are individuals with innovative solutions to society’s most pressing social problems. They are ambitious and persistent, tackling major social issues and offering new ideas for wide-scale change. Rather than leaving societal needs to the government or business sectors, social entrepreneurs find what is not working and solve the problem by changing the system, spreading the solution, and persuading entire societies to move in different directions. Social entrepreneurs often seem to be possessed by their ideas, committing their lives to changing the direction of their field. They are visionaries, but also realists, and are ultimately concerned with the practical implementation of their vision above all else. Source: Ashoka, “What is a Social Entrepreneur?” https://www.ashoka.org/social_entrepreneur
  8. 8. What is Social Entrepreneurship? Applying practical, innovative and sustainable approaches to benefit society in general, with an emphasis on those who are marginalized and poor. A term that captures a unique approach to economic and social problems, an approach that cuts across sectors and disciplines grounded in certain values and processes that are common to each social entrepreneur, independent of whether his/her area of focus has been education, health, welfare reform, human rights, workers' rights, environment, economic development, agriculture, etc., or whether the organizations they set up are non-profit or for-profit entities. It is this approach that sets the social entrepreneur apart from the rest of the crowd of well- meaning people and organizations who dedicate their lives to social improvement. Source: Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship, “What is a Social Entrepreneur?” http://www.schwabfound.org/content/what-social-entrepreneur
  9. 9. What is Social Innovation? Social Innovation Generation Poverty, homelessness, violence are all examples of social problems that still need dedicated solution-seeking space. Social innovation addresses these challenges by applying new learning and strategies to solve these problems. For social innovations to be successful and have durability, the innovation should have a measurable impact on the broader social, political and economic context that created the problem in the first place. Successful social innovations reduce vulnerability and enhance resilience. They have durability, scale and transformative impact. Centre for Social Innovation: Toronto Social innovations come from individuals, groups or organizations, and can take place in the for-profit, nonprofit and public sectors. Increasingly, they are happening in the spaces between these three sectors as perspectives collide to spark new ways of thinking. A social innovation is an idea that works for the public good. http://www.sigeneration.ca/?s=social+innovation+definition
  10. 10. Young Social Innovators Source: http://sprout.tigweb.org/about/impact.html Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjPvEn_Nqhc
  11. 11. Allow events to change you. Forget about good. Process is more important than outcome. Love your experiments. Go deep. Capture accidents. Study. Drift. Begin anywhere. Everyone is a leader. Harvest ideas. Keep moving. Slow down. Don’t be cool. Ask stupid questions. Collaborate. ____________________. (Intentionally blank). Stay up late. Work the metaphor. Be careful to take risks. Repeat yourself. Make your own tools. Stand on someone’s shoulders. Avoid software. Don’t clean your desk. Don’t enter awards competitions. Read only left-hand pages. Make new words. Think with your mind. Organization = Liberty. Don’t borrow money. Listen carefully. Take field trips. Make mistakes faster. Imitate. Scat. Explore the other edge. Coffee breaks, cab rides, green rooms. Avoid fields. Laugh. Remember. Power to the people. Source: http://www.massivechangeworkshops.com/the-incomplete-manifesto-for-growth/
  12. 12. Acting on Failure or Failure to Act? “Who would have thought that failure would be held up as something to be desired just a few years ago? Yet, it is one thing to extol the virtues of failure in words, it is quite another to create systems that support failure in action and if the latter doesn’t follow the former, failure will truly live up to its name among the innovation trends of the 21st century.” Source: http://censemaking.com/2014/04/08/acting-on-failure-or-failure-to-act/ What does failure mean to you?
  13. 13. Creative Tension Source: https://creativetension.wordpress.com/tag/peter-senge/ The gap between vision and current reality is also a source of energy. If there were no gap, there would be no need for any action to move towards the vision. We call this gap creative tension. http://nabsblogs.blogspot.ca/2010/08/creative-tension.html
  14. 14. How to think like Leonardo Da Vinci? http://michaelgelb.com/files/2010/10/How-to-Think-Like-Leonardo-Da-Vinci-DVD-booklet-download.pdf
  15. 15. Who wants to be an entrepreneur? 1 = not really 2 = a bit 3 = not sure 4 = probably 5 = for sure!
  16. 16. How would you describe a social innovation mindset?
  17. 17. How can we foster possibility thinking among our students? Meet Nobu.
  18. 18. Social Innovation Projects Cluster-based discussions ● What are some examples of successful social innovations? What do you admire about the project? How might you evolve or adapt this project to your community? After everyone in the group has a chance to share the project example, the group selects one project, and using the Padlet tool within the TIGed virtual classroom, brainstorm the ways that the select project might map to different curriculum expectations. ● How does social innovation connect with our curriculum?
  19. 19. 8 Essential Elements for Project-based Learning Effective driving questions for projects... ● Invite multiple answers ● Give students a real-world role ● Require an answer (in a global context) ● Are authentic and grounded in real-world problems ● Are “un-Googleable”
  20. 20. Hart’s Ladder of Participation (UNICEF) Children’s Participation: From Tokenism to Citizenship 8. Child-initiated, shared decisions with adults 7. Child-initiated and directed 6. Adult-initiated, shared decisions with children 5. Consulted and informed 4. Assigned but Informed 3. Tokenism 2. Decoration 1. Manipulation
  21. 21. Student Voice: Transforming Relationships Source: http://www.edugains.ca/resourcesLIT/ProfessionalLearning/CBS/CBS_StudentVoice.pdf
  22. 22. Student Voice: Transforming Relationships Source: http://www.edugains.ca/resourcesLIT/ProfessionalLearning/CBS/CBS_StudentVoice.pdf
  23. 23. Pedagogical Documentation Tips to Get Started: 1. Creates Shared Understanding 2. Celebrates the Rights of Individual Learners 3. Recognizes Students’ Ownership of Their Learning 4. Actualizes Shared Accountability 5. Provides Voice in Learning for Everyone “Through pedagogical documentation, the roles in education are shifting; what it means to be a learner and an educator are being transformed. Students and teachers alike are demonstrating ownership of and engaging in teaching and learning. Consequently, pedagogical documentation is a vehicle for learning that bridges understanding of children and adults.” Ontario Ministry of Education Capacity Building Series K-12, October 2012
  24. 24. Pedagogical Documentation Questions to ask when studying documentation: ● What are we trying to understand? ● What are we asking pedagogical documentation to help us look for? ● What do we see when we look closely and attentively at the documentation? ● What questions does this looking raise for us? ● What do we wonder about? ● What are our working theories about what we see? ● What does the documentation reveal about children’s working theories, feelings, attachments and interests? Dr. Carol Anne Wien, York University
  25. 25. Tech Tools for Pedagogical Documentation
  26. 26. Making Infographics with Piktochart
  27. 27. Digital Images: photo sharing with flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/tigphotos/sets/72157650396744408/
  28. 28. Global Gallery (for student artwork) http://gallery.tigweb.org
  29. 29. Tasks to be completed for Session Two ● Share and discuss a social innovation project with your class ● Explore and identify a compelling social problem they want to solve in their local or global community ● Document the process by capturing an image & uploading it to the classroom gallery.
  30. 30. Core Concepts & Essential Questions A discussion on the core concepts of social innovation with reference to related videos and readings, discussion on failure and resiliency, creative tension, and a growth mindset. Source: http://www.tigweb.org/action-tools/guide/ TakingITGlobal’s Guide to Action
  31. 31. Please add your cluster to our class map!
  32. 32. Co-constructing Success Criteria for our Social Innovation Projects...
  33. 33. What are some key considerations to keep in mind as we bring forth social innovation to our classrooms?
  34. 34. Thank you for your participation!

Editor's Notes

  • http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/CBS_Pedagogical.pdf
  • https://www.naeyc.org/files/tyc/file/Seitz.pdf

  • http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/Wien.pdf
  • http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/Wien.pdf

  • student voice in determining project scope and direction
    real-world social problem identified
    community partners involved
    integration of new technologies
    interdisciplinary
    evidence of collaborative learning

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