Digital Story Time - Preschool Programming with the iPad

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Workshop for Southern Ontario Library Service – February 2013
Harness the magic of the iPad to enhance your library’s preschool programming and outreach. Understand the difference between eBooks and book apps and learn why this new and rapidly developing format has profound implications for children's literature and exciting possibilities for library programming. Preview the best children's picture book apps and learn how to integrate the iPad into your story time repertoire. Gain practical tips for getting started and maximizing your app budget. Learn where to find a quality children’s book app and where to find reliable reviews and recommendations. Discover the impressive range of children’s apps available ‘beyond the book’ and explore other ways that the iPad can be used to create exciting and innovative children’s programs and services.

Published in: Education

Digital Story Time - Preschool Programming with the iPad

  1. 1. Story Time iPad Jennifer Gal Hamilton Public Library Photo courtesy of gcaserotti on Flickr.
  2. 2. http://pinterest.com/libraryjennifer
  3. 3. WhyWhatWhenWhereHowWho
  4. 4. Why … Photo courtesy of novemberwolf on Flickr.
  5. 5. • While the last several years has seen readership of eBooks increase exponentially amongst adults, until recently, this trend has had little impact on children’s reading habits.• This is changing as a result of two factors.
  6. 6. 1• Though eReaders, tablets and other mobile devices aren’t designed with the preschool crowd in mind, they are making their way into little hands through parents or adults.• The Joan Ganz Cooney Center identified this phenomenon as the pass-back effect. “iLearn: A Content Analysis of the iTunes App Store’s Education Section.” Carly Shuler Joan Ganz Cooney Center, March 25, 2010
  7. 7. 1• Publishers who previously ignored the children’s eBook market under the assumption that “if kids dont own Kindles and Nooks theres no point in selling books to them” now need to change their strategy to respond to increasing demand for children’s digital content. “Tech Trends: Talking Apps and Ebooks at TOC Bologna.” Lauren Barack SLJ, April 12, 2011
  8. 8. 1The percentage ofchildren who haveread an eBook hasalmost doubledsince 2010.46% of childrenhave read an eBook -up from 25% in 2010. “Scholastic Kids and Family Reading Report.” Scholastic, January 2013
  9. 9. 2
  10. 10. 2• “Sixty percent of publishing executives believe that tablets have become ‘the ideal reading platform,’ and 45 percent believe that dedicated eReaders will soon be irrelevant”. “As Tablets Supplant Ereaders, New Challenges Arise for Publishers.” Matt Enis The Digital Shift January 17, 2013
  11. 11. 2• As demand shifts from dedicated eReaders to touch screen tablets, there are exciting implications for picture books.• While the small, black and white screens of the first generation eReaders were not suited to picture books, the iPad and other tablets are ideal – offering vibrant, full colour displays with powerful interactivity.• The future of pop-up and lift the flap books is digital.
  12. 12. 2• Karen Lotz, CEO of Candlewick Press, explained that they were initially “hesitant to enter into [the digital] market when it was simply taking a beautiful physical object, scanning it, and then presenting it in a very inadequate way ... We decided ‘we’re going to ... wait until these devices could do justice to these materials.’ In a way, our story is just beginning because of tablets.”. “As Tablets Supplant Ereaders, New Challenges Arise for Publishers.” Matt Enis The Digital Shift January 17, 2013
  13. 13. PopOut! The Tale of Peter Rabbit
  14. 14. • 1 out of every 6 computers shipped in the last quarter of 2012 was an iPad.• “None of the leading computer manufacturers shipped as many computers total as Apple sold iPads”. 1 2 3 4 5 6 “Crazy iPad Numbers: 1 in 6 Computers Shipped Last Quarter Was an iPad.” iPad Insight. February 7, 2013
  15. 15. iPads account for 91% of all tablet web traffic Apple “91% of All Tablet Web Traffic & Other Crazy iPad Numbers at Today’s Apple Event.” iPad Insight. September 12, 2012
  16. 16. • 27% lower income homes vs. 57% higher income homes have mobile media devices.• 14% lower income homes vs. 47% higher income homes have downloaded apps.• 38% of lower income parents don’t know what an app is. “Zero to Eight: Children’s Media Use in America.” Common Sense Media, October 2011
  17. 17. What …Photo courtesy of Gustavo Devito on Flickr.
  18. 18. • eBooks are digital documents in the EPUB or PDF format. eBooks have limited interactivity beyond resizing text, searching content, etc.• Enhanced eBooks (ePUB3) are a new format that allows easy integration of video, audio, and interactivity, ideal for non-fiction.• Book apps are standalone software applications that are designed specifically for the Apple or Android operating system. “Interactive eBook Apps: The Reinvention of Reading and Interactivity.” UX Magazine, April 12, 2012
  19. 19. • Book apps are “designed specifically to utilize the powers of tablets to enable users to interact with the storyline in sight, sound, and touch.”• Not all book apps are created equal. While some can be static and relatively low tech, there are an increasing number of high quality apps available with an incredible level of interactivity. “Interactive eBook Apps: The Reinvention of Reading and Interactivity.” UX Magazine, April 12, 2012
  20. 20. • Native apps are books which have been written and designed specifically for the iPad. Because they are created for the touchscreen interface, interactive elements can sometimes seem more organic to the story. However, native apps are sometimes lacking in terms of story and quality of art work.• Adapted apps are titles that were originally released in print and have been translated for the iPad.
  21. 21. • Successful print books don’t always translate well to the iPad and need to be evaluated in terms of their effectiveness as an app. Moo, Baa, La La La! Goodnight Moon
  22. 22. • The best apps incorporate meaningful interactivity instead of simply adding a game layer over the story. Excessive bells and whistles can be distracting and break the flow of the story.• Interactive elements or hot spots should propel the narrative forward rather creating a detour.
  23. 23. • Book apps can also be evaluated according to the same criteria used for print media.• While interactivity is very important, it can’t compensate for a weak narrative or poor illustrations.
  24. 24. When … Photo courtesy of courosa on Flickr.
  25. 25. • Picture book apps can be introduced as another format to add interest and variety to your story time session.
  26. 26. • The iPad offers lots of possibilities for incorporating music and sounds. Individual songs can purchased in iTunes and there is a growing number of children’s song apps available.• There are also lots of apps devoted exclusively to animal sounds.
  27. 27. • Apps such Felt Board and Make a Scene enable the iPad to function as a digital flannel board.• Other apps naturally invite the same type of audience interactions as traditional felt boards. Nighty Night and Endless Alphabet are good examples.
  28. 28. • There are lots of nursery rhyme apps available and some, such as Mulberry Fingerplays, even include an instructional element which can serve as an excellent training resource for staff.
  29. 29. Where …
  30. 30. • There are a multitude of children’s apps available but navigating the App Store can be overwhelming.• Most traditional print reviewing sources now include app reviews as well as annual best apps lists.• The handful of screenshots provided in the App Store are inadequate to evaluate an app, so these reviews sometimes provide video previews. YouTube is also a great source for app previews.
  31. 31. www.kirkusreviews.com/lists/best-book-apps-of-2012/
  32. 32. www.slj.com/category/books-media/reviews/apps/
  33. 33. www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/digital/Apps/
  34. 34. www.hbook.com/category/choosing-books/app-review-of-the-week/
  35. 35. www.commonsensemedia.org/guide/best-first-kids-apps/ipad
  36. 36. http://littleelit.com
  37. 37. Boing Boing: Apps for Kids Podcasthttp://boingboing.net/tag/appsforkidsBest Apps for Kidswww.bestappsforkids.orgDigital Storytimehttp://digital-storytime.comiPhone Momwww.theiphonemom.com
  38. 38. How … Photo courtesy of flickingerbrad on Flickr.
  39. 39. • iPad 2 or iPad 3*• VGA cable and VGA adaptor• A projector*1st generation iPads do not allow ‘mirroring’ via a projector
  40. 40. • For groups of five or more, the iPad is most effective when used with a projector.• When connected to a projector through a VGA cable, be careful not to break the connection. This can be tricky with apps that require physical movements – such as shaking.• Always practice with an app before using it in a program, so that you are familiar with the navigation and ‘hot spots.’
  41. 41. • There are a huge range of childrens apps available for the iPad through the App Store, ranging in price from 99¢ to $9.99 – though most apps are less than $5.• Apps are occasionally offered at reduced prices or free for a limited period. Watch reviewing sites and in the Featured section of the App Store for special app promotions.
  42. 42. • Up to 10 devices and computers (combined) can be authorized to the same Apple ID, allowing for apps to be purchased once and used on multiple iPads.• New apps will load automatically on all devices by selecting Automatic Downloads in the iPad Settings under iTunes and App Stores.
  43. 43. single license - $12.99Reflector App five user license - $54.99• Reflector enables you to mirror content wirelessly from your iPad to a computer. The only requirement is that both devices need to be on the same wireless network.
  44. 44. The Wallee Hand Strap $19.95
  45. 45. The Survivor Case $79.99
  46. 46. Who…Photo courtesy of babieswithipads.tumblr.com.
  47. 47. • Staff selected app recommendation lists
  48. 48. • iPad kiosks in the children’s department $345.00 Tabletop iPad kiosk by Lilitab Photo courtesy of gcaserotti on Flickr.
  49. 49. • Circulating Early Literacy iPad Kits
  50. 50. • iPad programming for all ages Photo courtesy of Stow-Munroe Falls Public LibraryOH on Flickr.
  51. 51. RecapPhoto courtesy of flickingerbrad on Flickr.
  52. 52. WhyWhatWhenWhereHowWho
  53. 53. Photo courtesy of aperturismo on FlickrQuestions?
  54. 54. http://pinterest.com/libraryjennifer Jennifer Gal Hamilton Public Library jgal@hpl.ca

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