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The challenges of building a strong data infrastructure

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The challenges of building a strong data infrastructure

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In the 21st century, data is infrastructure for our economy, just like roads. In this session, Jeni will talk about the big challenges of building a strong data infrastructure: challenges of equality of access, challenges of privacy and trust, and the technical challenges of discovery and interoperability.

In the 21st century, data is infrastructure for our economy, just like roads. In this session, Jeni will talk about the big challenges of building a strong data infrastructure: challenges of equality of access, challenges of privacy and trust, and the technical challenges of discovery and interoperability.

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The challenges of building a strong data infrastructure

  1. 1. summer school The challenges of building a strong data infrastructure Jeni Tennison – CEO – Open Data Institute
  2. 2. We connect, equip and inspire people around the world to innovate with data Sir Tim Berners-Lee, President Sir Nigel Shadbolt, Chairman Neelie Kroes, ODI Board Martha Lane-Fox, ODI Board
  3. 3. 1. What's changing 2. What that means for us
  4. 4. Unlock £trillions & impact everyone Link insight from countries, millions of companies, billions of people and things Machine-readable data, sensors and the internet of everything A robust data infrastructure will enable open innovation at web-scale What is the future of the web of data? 25 years of the web of documents
  5. 5. http://www2.deloitte.com/uk/en/pages/deloitte-analytics/articles/open-data-driving-growth-ingenuity-and-innovation.html
  6. 6. data infrastructure datopolis privacy and trust equality of access discovery and interoperability
  7. 7. data infrastructure datopolis privacy and trust equality of access discovery and interoperability
  8. 8. At least 84% of Americans with a smartphone use a service powered by open data every day (source: Pew Research, 2014)
  9. 9. Data is infrastructure for our (digital) economy
  10. 10. https://www.flickr.com/photos/pkwflickr/6188760566/in/album-72157627764211574/ Roads help us navigate to a location. Data help us navigate to a decision.
  11. 11. https://www.flickr.com/photos/ronsaunders47/7459822850
  12. 12. https://www.flickr.com/photos/highwaysagency/6194409693
  13. 13. https://www.flickr.com/photos/36844288@N00/4982230334
  14. 14. Data assets Guides Operations Funding Oversight Community
  15. 15. Companies across the UK and of all sizes are investing in open data theodi.org/open-data-means-business
  16. 16. Data is infrastructure for our economy
  17. 17. Design for open Build with the web Respect privacy Benefit everyone Think big but start small Design to adapt Encourage open innovation theodi.org/guides/principles-for-strengthening-our-data-infrastructure
  18. 18. data infrastructure datopolis privacy and trust equality of access discovery and interoperability
  19. 19. setup: draw a tile place it as open data draw 2 tiles each place one each as closed data put a marker on your tile
  20. 20. data infrastructure datopolis privacy and trust equality of access discovery and interoperability
  21. 21. care.data data and trust
  22. 22. https://www.flickr.com/photos/infomastern/16207847914
  23. 23. https://www.flickr.com/photos/websmith/7444621308
  24. 24. https://www.flickr.com/photos/75279887@N05/6914441342
  25. 25. Justice Data Lab data and trust
  26. 26. theodi.org/guides/openness-principles-for-organisations-handling- personal-data Openness about how organisations secure and manage personal data builds trust
  27. 27. data infrastructure datopolis privacy and trust equality of access discovery and interoperability
  28. 28. http://www.theodi.org/data-spectrum
  29. 29. Open Banking Working Group Set up in September 2015 at the request of HM Treasury to explore how data could be used to help people transact, save, borrow, lend and invest their money
  30. 30. May 2016, CMA requires banks to release and make available transaction data through an open API and particular reference and product information as open data
  31. 31. data infrastructure datopolis privacy and trust equality of access discovery and interoperability
  32. 32. search for documents
  33. 33. 1996
  34. 34. 1996
  35. 35. 1999
  36. 36. today
  37. 37. trends in document discovery apply to data discovery
  38. 38. explicit registration  automatic discovery
  39. 39. tagging / categorisation  indexing
  40. 40. meaning from metadata  meaning from content
  41. 41. nodes  network
  42. 42. present links  present information
  43. 43. https://www.flickr.com/photos/gagilas/6528992381 Build for the web
  44. 44. data infrastructure datopolis privacy and trust equality of access discovery and interoperability
  45. 45. Jeni Tennison – CEO – @JeniT – jeni@theodi.org

Editor's Notes

  • 2
  • First change: new sources of data as the world becomes more instrumented: we have internet of things, carry location trackers in our pockets, post updates on social media and so on. Any talk about the future has to contain something about what a massive change this is, how much more data there is.

    Over the past 25 years, the web of documents now numbers in the billions of pages. The web of data will dwarf the existing web.
  • But it's not just about the quantity of data. There is a second swathe of changes that come about because of the availability of data, in the relationships between the state and both citizens and businesses
  • http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/many-americans-dont-know-theyre-using-government-data-using-apps-like-uber-pew-reports-says/
  • I use the analogy that data is like a road – pretty uninteresting in and of itself, but gets you somewhere
    roads connect together, like data connects together, but the other thing about roads is that they don't just appear out of nowhere: we make them
  • Roads can be poor quality, in which case they're hard to navigate, just like poor quality data is hard to use. But you can still use it.
    Most roads start like this, just like most data starts out not being particularly high quality
  • we choose what roads we make, we choose which roads we invest in to make them wider or easier to travel on, where we put junctions and where bridges
    and they make everyone's lives easier
  • Our road infrastructure is more than just the physical roads, it's also things like the rules of the road
    In the same way, our data infrastructure is more than a list of datasets…
  • not just startups taking advantage of free data sources
    large companies like Arup gaining greater insights
    companies like Thomson Reuters producing open data to give better value to customers
    companies like Syngenta releasing data as part of their accountability
    not just digital products – where Sainsbury's places their stores, how they manage the quality of produce they get from their farmers
    how councils like Camden plan interventions to tackle child obesity
    how parents choose which school to send their child to
    how you decide which train to take to work
  • Datopolis is a board game that we created to help look at the way data works in a society, how we can use it and what's important about the decisions we make about the data infrastructure we build
  • The game is set in the city of Sheridan, which you're trying to keep functioning well.
    You keep track of Social, Economic & Environmental health of the city on the dashboard.
    If any of the scores reach -4, you have one last chance to save the city or you all lose the game.
    If they all reach +4, the city has reached nirvana.
  • You'll be building a data infrastructure together, using data tiles of these different sorts.
    You'll be creating applications based on the data that's available in the data infrastructure, and how it's linked together.
  • Three kinds of cards:
    events are drawn at the end of your turn, and they show things happening to the City of Sheridan
    tools are ideas you have in your hand, that you can build during your turn if the data infrastructure contains the right data tiles in the right configuration. When you build a tool, you can increase one of the scores on the City Dashboard, depending on what's highlighted at the bottom of the card. Each tool that you build is worth the same number of points as tiles used to create the tool. When someone has built 10 points of tools, it's the end of the game.
    role cards tell you what you're aiming for. There are businesses who aim to be first to create 10 points of tools. There are third sector groups who want the score in the area they care about to be highest at the end of the game. And there are public sector groups who care about the data in the data infrastructure being as open as possible.
  • Turns are detailed on the turn card.
  • You can't talk about data without talking about people's personal data and how that is handled, so let's get that out of the way first
  • We have a model that's mostly based on consent, but this is problematic
    people often don't understand what they're really consenting to, or have no option but to consent
    keeping track of consent is hard, especially when it involves nuances about use
    we draw wrong conclusions if we only use data on those who consent (for whatever reason)

  • What is ownership of data?
    Ownership isn't even clear for physical things. When you "own" a flat you might co-own it with someone else, have taken a mortgage to pay for it, such that a bank has rights of possession. There are limits to what you can do in your flat, both legally and socially. Others have the right to enter your flat under certain circumstances. Sometimes you might be able to sublet or rent out a room.
    Ownership is complicated.
  • picking blackberries from your land: if I do all the harvesting & packaging work, how much do I owe you?
  • if ownership is complicated in the real world, it's even more complicated for data
    data is not like tangible things, it's infinitely reproduceable; my use does not impact your use
  • Perhaps what matters more is what is done with the data about us: what decisions are made about us based on that data, that then have an impact on our lives.
    This is a particular concern where the decisions are made through artificial intelligence.
  • There are new ways of providing access to data that don't involve copying data wholesale between different organisations, eg APIs, microsegmentation
  • We need to have a debate at a societal level about what uses of data are acceptable.
    It is a cultural thing.
    Transparency around data use helps inform that debate.
  • We can move data. We can open it and we can close it.
  • CKAN
  • Socrata
  • dataworld
  • LiveStories
  • European Data Portal
  • CSV on the web aims to be something that could underpin those changes:
    Encourages publication of data in ways that can be discoverable.
    Enables provision of metadata, but also the use of data within CSV files.
    Supports linking between datasets for both discovery and more sophisticated ranking.
    Provides mechanisms for informed presentation
  • Build for the Web

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