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Mollie Ettenborough 2013 masccc

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Newburyport, MA

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Mollie Ettenborough 2013 masccc

  1. 1. The  City  of  Newburyport    Small,  coastal  city  in  Essex  County,  35  miles  northeast  of  Boston.  Popula@on  of  17,416  as  of  the  2010  census.  Historic  seaport  with  a  vibrant  tourism  industry,  and  includes  an  industrial  park.  Newburyport  includes  part  of  Plum  Island.    
  2. 2. Star@ng  Point  •  Took  a  big  picture  view  of  managing  like  a  business  and/or  campus  to  manage  all  assets    •  Energy  Advisory  CommiOee  (EAC)  studies,  evaluates,  and  makes  recommenda@ons  to  the  Mayor  regarding  energy  conserva@on,  energy  efficiency,  and/or  conversion  to  greener  energy  sources.  The  EAC  assists  the  Mayor  by  iden@fying  policy  implica@ons  and  cost  savings  derived  from  poten@al  energy  conserva@on,  and  inves@ga@ng  sustainable  development  measures  and  guidelines  for  local  businesses  and  homeowners.    •  Schools  had  begun  this  work  in  2004  and  had  achieved  savings      •  Benchmarked  all  buildings  with  EPA  PorTolio  Manager  •  S@mulus  funding  started  programs      
  3. 3. City  Wide  Usage  •  Newburyport  has  14  municipal  buildings    •  47,875    MMBtu’s  in  2012.    •  17%  reduc@on  since  baseline  year  in  2009    Timeline  of  Annual  Municipal  Energy  Use  Baseline  MMBtuYear  1  MMBtuYear  2  MMBtuYear  3  MMBtuYear  4  MMBtuYear  5  MMBtuFor  Most  Recent  Year:  Change  vs.  Baseline  (%)Fiscal  Year  2009 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014  Buildings 39,522 33,214 34,558 28,981     73%Water/Sewer  &  Pumping 16,501 15,098 16,143 15,662     95%Open  Space  (op@onal)              Vehicles 7,057 7,817 8,544 7,958     113%Street  and  Traffic  Lights 3,705 3,481 3,294 3,232     87%TOTAL  ENERGY  CONSUMPTION 66,785 59,610 62,539 55,833     84%
  4. 4. Energy  Efficiency  Conserva0on  Block  Grant    2009  This  grant  funded  three  energy  conserva@on  projects,  aimed  at  reducing  energy  use  by  43%  at  the  City  of  Newburyport’s  Kelley  Youth  Services  Center  one  of  the  least  efficient  buildings  in  the  City.    HVAC  Efficiency  Improvements  Air  Sealing  and  insula@on  Upgrades  to  steam  and  air  handling  new  thermostats  
  5. 5. First  Green  Community  Grant-­‐$155,000  total  projected  annual  savings  $14,800  City  Hall-­‐ligh0ng  upgrades  included;    air  sealing  and  insula0on  upgrades,  separa0on  of  thermal  zones,  upgrades  to  steam  system,  and  insula0on  of  boiler  room  condensate  piping.      
  6. 6. Police  Sta@on-­‐  first  grant  HVAC  rooiop  improvements  Air  sealing  at  soffits  
  7. 7. Energy  Efficiency    •  Schools-­‐  Total  System  Wide  Electricity  Usage  in  all  school  buildings  from  FY04  to  FY11  was  down  36%  resul@ng  in  a  savings  of  approximately  $270,000  annually  •  Promoted  residen@al  energy  efficiency  programs-­‐  Carbon  and    Community  Energy  Challenge,  and  Mass  Save  programs,  and  general  educa@on  on  energy  efficiency.      •  Schools-­‐  Solar  traffic  ligh@ng  and  outdoor  LED  ligh@ng    •  Solar  trash  compactors  in  many  public  areas  •  Goals  for  new  WWTF  OCL  Building  Include:  –   Improve  Process  Efficiency  –   Upgrade  Inefficient  Equipment  &  Systems  –   Enhanced  Process  Control    – Limit  Power  Consump@on  –   Add  Renewable  Energy  Components  –   LEED  Cer@fica@on  for  the  New  OCL  Building    
  8. 8. City  Wide  Usage  •  Newburyport  has  14  municipal  buildings    •  47,875    MMBtu’s  in  2012.    •  17%  reduc@on  since  baseline  year  in  2009    Timeline  of  Annual  Municipal  Energy  Use  Baseline  MMBtuYear  1  MMBtuYear  2  MMBtuYear  3  MMBtuYear  4  MMBtuYear  5  MMBtuFor  Most  Recent  Year:  Change  vs.  Baseline  (%)Fiscal  Year  2009 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014  Buildings 39,522 33,214 34,558 28,981     73%Water/Sewer  &  Pumping 16,501 15,098 16,143 15,662     95%Open  Space  (op@onal)              Vehicles 7,057 7,817 8,544 7,958     113%Street  and  Traffic  Lights 3,705 3,481 3,294 3,232     87%TOTAL  ENERGY  CONSUMPTION 66,785 59,610 62,539 55,833     84%
  9. 9. Clean  Energy    Newburyport  Middle  and  Upper  Elementary  with  a    500  kW  Solar  Array    
  10. 10. Clean  Energy-­‐    True  North  Solar-­‐  Net  Metering  for  Newburyport  Salisbury    and  Triton  School  District    •  True  North  •  Water  Sewer  •  MVPC  
  11. 11. Lessons  Learned  in  Becoming    a  Green  Community  •  Our  first  aOempt  to  pass  Stretch  Code  failed  •  Real  costs  savings      •  Requires  long-­‐range  planning  and  accountability  •  Great  exercise  if  only  to  develop  a  comprehensive  energy  plan  and  usage  data  base    •  Encourages  greater  responsibility  of  municipal  assets    •  Transporta@on  sector  needs  further  innova@on  
  12. 12. Future  •  One  new  school  and  one  upgrading  taking  place.    Both  will  meet  reimbursement  points  for  either  LEED  or  CHPS  (High  Performance  Schools)  •  Street  lights-­‐in  process  of  purchasing  •  Clean  Energy  Strategies  Program  with  Mass  CEC    •  Incorpora@ng  energy  planning  and  sustainability  into  city’s  Master  Plan  •  Energy  fund  •  Net  zero  by  2030  
  13. 13. Opportuni@es  to  innovate  and  save    •  Zero  Waste  Pilot    •  Buying  Energy  on  Contract  •  Transporta@on    •  Anaerobic  Diges@on  and  FOG    •  Cross  pollina@on  and  overall  sustainability    •  Think  big  picture        

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