Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Student Engagement in Campus/CommunityCollaboration for SustainabilityAmanda Graham, Ph.D.Director, Education OfficeMIT En...
If you want to go fast,go alone.If you want to go far,go together.community supports campuscampus supports communityForsus...
…a framework to create broadercollaboration among Cambridge,MIT and Harvard, deepen sharedcommitment to more healthy,livab...
A campus/communitylearning laboratory is a“space” forexperimentation with…• A variety of approaches and tools• A team of c...
Who do we need in this lab?A team to create and share useful knowledge• Researcher/learners – aka, students• Subject matte...
Two examples of campus/community classes to demonstrate
Water, Landscape & Urban Design, fall 2012James Wescoat, ArchitectureFocus: creative storm-water design alternativesfor Ke...
Context: slated for campusdevelopment in MIT 2030 plan toimprove the eastern “gateway” tocampus; major hub within City ofC...
Method: Design Workshop• Long, in-depth sessions• Professional critical review• Policy/planning mix• Broad target audience...
Key Impact: greater level of key stakeholder understanding ofstormwater management and possibilities for project inclusion...
Community Energy Innovations: Cambridge MultifamilyPilot Design, spring 2013Harvey Michaels, Lawrence Susskind; Urban Stud...
Context: Massachusetts regulationsrequire aggressive utility energyefficiency programs ; NSTAR hascommitted funds; City pr...
Method: Practicum• 3-hour session• Specific client; iteration with client• Constrained deliverable• Existing partnership• ...
Key Impact: potential adoption of pilot program designApril 26: MIT Community Energy InnovationsSymposium/Workshop – Enabl...
What can we learn from these examples?Campus/community collaboration provides powerfullearning opportunities• It matters t...
What can we learn from these examples (continued)?Even “unconstrained” opportunities must havecommunity-defined elements• ...
What can we learn from these examples (continued)?Role of convenor (typically faculty) is critical• Effective management o...
A note on the future of higher education…How can we leverage the revolution in universitylearning – blending digital and r...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Amanda Graham masccc 2013

508 views

Published on

MIT

Published in: Business, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Amanda Graham masccc 2013

  1. 1. Student Engagement in Campus/CommunityCollaboration for SustainabilityAmanda Graham, Ph.D.Director, Education OfficeMIT Energy InitiativeThe Campus as a Learning Lab for CommunitySustainability at the 2013 Massachusetts SustainableCommunities and Campuses Conference24 April 2013
  2. 2. If you want to go fast,go alone.If you want to go far,go together.community supports campuscampus supports communityForsustainability,
  3. 3. …a framework to create broadercollaboration among Cambridge,MIT and Harvard, deepen sharedcommitment to more healthy,livable, and sustainable localcommunity.May 6:Cambridge Community Compact fora Sustainable Future
  4. 4. A campus/communitylearning laboratory is a“space” forexperimentation with…• A variety of approaches and tools• A team of collaborators (“research group”)• Leadership and reflection• Real-world problems and challenges• Dual outcomes: learning and “experimental”• Local relevanceAND
  5. 5. Who do we need in this lab?A team to create and share useful knowledge• Researcher/learners – aka, students• Subject matter experts – aka, stakeholders• Leadership – aka, faculty
  6. 6. Two examples of campus/community classes to demonstrate
  7. 7. Water, Landscape & Urban Design, fall 2012James Wescoat, ArchitectureFocus: creative storm-water design alternativesfor Kendall Square• Site was tidal flats• Dense, paved• River seems removed• Stormwater managementmajor city priority
  8. 8. Context: slated for campusdevelopment in MIT 2030 plan toimprove the eastern “gateway” tocampus; major hub within City ofCambridge; climate change andsuperstorm SandyKey Stakeholders:MITIMCO, CampusPlanning, CRWA,Cambridge Planning Board
  9. 9. Method: Design Workshop• Long, in-depth sessions• Professional critical review• Policy/planning mix• Broad target audience• Unconstrained deliverable“Extraordinarylocal knowledgeand high-spiritedfeedback”• “Out of the box” thinking• Low pressure environment• Exploration of communityculture
  10. 10. Key Impact: greater level of key stakeholder understanding ofstormwater management and possibilities for project inclusionwithout compromising value proposition“We planted a seed”
  11. 11. Community Energy Innovations: Cambridge MultifamilyPilot Design, spring 2013Harvey Michaels, Lawrence Susskind; Urban Studies &PlanningFocus: develop pilot energyefficiency program formultifamily/small commercial• Hard to reach, underserved• Persistent market barriers• Diverse tenants, landlords
  12. 12. Context: Massachusetts regulationsrequire aggressive utility energyefficiency programs ; NSTAR hascommitted funds; City providing in-kind;successful NSTAR-MIT “EfficiencyForward” 3-yr campaign to reduce MITenergy use by 15% (34M kwh)Key Stakeholders: NSTAR, City ofCambridge, Department of PublicUtilities
  13. 13. Method: Practicum• 3-hour session• Specific client; iteration with client• Constrained deliverable• Existing partnership• Creative thinking within constraints• Translating theory to practice• Practice professional planner skills: integrate variety ofinfo/perspectives; what is the role of the planner?“How to be just feasible enough AND just bold enough”
  14. 14. Key Impact: potential adoption of pilot program designApril 26: MIT Community Energy InnovationsSymposium/Workshop – Enabling Efficiency in MultifamilyHousing• Utility incentives and financing• Community-based marketing• Retrofit technology• Disclosure, bench-marking, GIS mapping
  15. 15. What can we learn from these examples?Campus/community collaboration provides powerfullearning opportunities• It matters to students that the collaboration is not anexercise in a vacuum• Students learn to deal with limited data, time,resources, unforeseen developmentsConstrained and unconstrained opportunities areuseful, for students and communities• Constrained contribute more to process of becominga professional; unconstrained provides focusedopportunity for exploration (ideas and colleagues)
  16. 16. What can we learn from these examples (continued)?Even “unconstrained” opportunities must havecommunity-defined elements• “Just a learning exercise” is not enough• Accountability to and interaction with people whocontribute to/lead decision-making defines learningexperienceImpact goes beyond class product• Colleagues, networks, relationships• Student work seeds the larger process“everyone who was at that table will think differently”
  17. 17. What can we learn from these examples (continued)?Role of convenor (typically faculty) is critical• Effective management of expectations aids the cross-cultural engagement• Time, scope, incentive• Outreach coaching for students is necessaryReflective learning is baked inArchitecture/planning pedagogies are well-suited forlearning laboratory…. Can we extend them?
  18. 18. A note on the future of higher education…How can we leverage the revolution in universitylearning – blending digital and residential – to growthe campus/community learning laboratory forsustainability?• Remember: local benefit contributes to relevanceand reward for students.

×