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How to write a marketing plan workshop

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Stamats workshop on how to write a marketing plan.

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How to write a marketing plan workshop

  1. 1. presented by Jeffrey Rich Vice President, Marketing & Innovation Stamats, Inc. Cedar Rapids, IA 52406 (800) 553-8878
  2. 2. Introductions – Jeffrey Rich  Vice President of Marketing & Innovation  25 years marketing experience across higher education, corporate, and agency settings  Served two comprehensive universities as Vice President of Marketing, PR and Enrollment Management 2 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  3. 3. Introductions Tracy Thomson Stuart Spires Sr. Client Consultant Sr. Client Consultant 3 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  4. 4. Today’s Agenda 8:00 a.m. 8:30 a.m. 10:30 – 10:45 a.m. 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 5:00 p.m. Continental breakfast and registration check-in Workshop begins Morning break Lunch buffet Afternoon break Wrap-up  8:30 to 10:30 - Review and discuss Integrated Marketing Communications  Examples of compelling messaging  10:45 to 12:00 - Top 10 Marketing Mistakes Colleges and Universities Make  1:00 to 3:30 – Plan development workshop  Creating your own plan  3:45 to 5:00 - Discuss plans  Four Good Ideas 4 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  5. 5. About Stamats Stamats is recognized and respected as the nation’s higher education integrated marketing thought leader. Our comprehensive array of innovative services has set the standard for pairing insightful, research-based strategic counsel with compelling creative solutions. We promise our clients the highest level of professional service and attention to detail in the industry because, in the end, we know our success is measured entirely by theirs. Research, Planning, and Consulting ■ Brand clarification and development ■ Image and perception studies ■ Recruiting and marketing assessments, plans, and counsel ■ Tuition pricing elasticity and brand value studies Strategic Creative ■ Institutional, admission and ■ ■ ■ ■ 5 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013 advancement websites Mobile and social media solutions Recruiting and advancement campaigns and publications Virtual and experiential tours Full media advertising campaigns
  6. 6. Evolving Definition of Marketing (AMA)  “The performance of business activities that direct the flow of goods and services from producer to consumer or user” (1960)  “The process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of goods, ideas, and services to create exchanges that satisfy individual and organizational goals” (1985)  “An organizational function and a set of processes for creating, communicating, and delivering value to customers and for managing customer relationships in ways that benefit the organization and its stakeholders” (2004) We talk, you listen We make, you take 6 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013 - Old IBM motto
  7. 7. Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC)  IMC is an institution-wide effort to communicate your core values in ways that target audiences notice, understand, and respond to  IMC includes brand marketing, direct marketing, and internal communication IMC is a subset of integrated marketing 7 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  8. 8. Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) 8 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  9. 9. 9 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  10. 10. Direct Marketing (DM)  Designed to generate a response  Sometimes called direct response marketing  Primary direct marketers:  Admissions – want to visit, apply, attend?  Advancement – want to give?  Historic DM channels:  Telephone  Postal mail  New(er) channels:  Email  Social media  IM  Blogging (and all its permutations) 10 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  11. 11. Brand Marketing  A brand is not a look  Rather, a brand is a compelling promise a college, university, or school makes to its most important audiences to meet a need or fulfill an expectation  Perry Forster: “A brand is a promise expressed as a benefit that your target audiences value”  Truly successful brands are perceived by the target audience as the best, or even only, solution to a particular need  Brands give permission 11 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  12. 12. Internal Communication  Most organizations overlook the strategic importance of internal communication  Engaged employees as a channel  Keeps internal audiences informed about  The day-to-day  Progress toward achieving your vision  When internal audiences are engaged, they are more likely to become advocates 12 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  13. 13. Integrated Marketing 13 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  14. 14. Customer Experience Management  What is it that we sell, anyway? The sum of all the experiences that a student has on campus (and off campus) and the opportunities they have when they leave “80% of organizations believe they deliver a superior customer experience, but only 8% of their customers agree” – Bain & Company  Your experience and your brand are closely tied 14 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  15. 15. Remember the Eight Percent?  Unlike most organizations, which reflexively turn to product or service design to improve customer satisfaction, experience leaders pursue three imperatives simultaneously:  They design the right experiences for the right people (customers)  They deliver on these experiences by focusing the entire organization with an emphasis on cross-functional collaboration  They develop their capabilities to please customers again and again— by such means as improving the product experience, training people in how to create and deliver new customer experiences, and establishing direct accountability for the customer experience 15 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  16. 16. Who Pleases Customers? 16 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  17. 17. Experience Marketing or Brand Engagement Defined  The identification and management, to a specific end, of the key touch points that define an experience that a customer has with a product or service  Have you diagramed key student and donor experiences?  Admissions area?  Financial aid?  Registrar? 17 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  18. 18. Brand Engagement through Integrated Marketing, or Just Promotion? 19 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  19. 19. Core Beliefs About Brands  Strong brands demand: 1) Current and comprehensive market research;     2) Respect for your school’s heritage; and 3) A clear and shared vision A brand strategy will more likely involve the clarification of your institution’s current core values rather than the creation of new core values The goal of a brand strategy is to establish and hold a position of perceived and real value in the minds of your most important internal and external audiences and thereby return measurable value to the institution The brand strategy should engage, equip, and energize the campus community An effective brand communication strategy demands message discipline and channel creativity 20 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  20. 20. Options for Reputation Building  Academic quality – high selectivity: Do you attract the best students in the      country? Academic quality – faculty research: The quality, amount, and type of faculty research is a significant indicator of brand equity Big-time sports: Athletics are the front door. Win big or lose big, but don’t do six and six Image-building: Institutions that work hard to build a strong local, regional, and even national image will build brand equity Co-branding (alliance marketing): Marrying your brand with another, perhaps more prestigious brand, or a brand of particular interest to a target audience, is often used to jump-start a brand (U.S. News & World Report; NYT, Battelle, Boeing) Endowment: $500 million in the bank might be a brand unto itself 21 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  21. 21. Building a Brand That Matters Clarify and confirm the stated and unstated institutional core values that will drive your overall brand strategy Settle on, or commit to, a single brand positioning strategy 22 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013 Convey involves both communicating the brand and living out the brand.
  22. 22. What Problems Do the Following Brands Solve?        Volvo Mont Blanc Gatorade Disney FedEx Target Yale  What problem does yours solve? 23 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013 Drive Safely
  23. 23. Sample Brands  MIT: Premier technological university in the world  Yeshiva: Comprehensive Jewish institution of higher education in the U.S.  Appalachian State: Serve the people and communities of Appalachia  Biola: The nation’s only comprehensive, urban, evangelical university *Positions held or desired (and likely to be achieved); positions valued by both internal and external audiences 24 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  24. 24. Focus on the Sweet Spot Brand Sweet Spot 25 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  25. 25. Brand Architecture  A systematic way of viewing and organizing your institutional (super) and sub-brands, attributes, and graphic identity so as to achieve greater clarity, synergy, and leverage ̶ House of brands or a branded house  A clear brand architecture is especially critical as brand contexts become more complex with multiple sub-brands and product offerings Institutional Super Brand College I College II Adult Ed Program 26 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013 Law School Medical School Athletics
  26. 26. Architecture – continued  “House of brands” House of Brands 27 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013  “Branded house” Branded House
  27. 27. Your Brand…  Begins with your mission and vision  Is “rooted” in your brand promise  Is communicated via your brand attributes  Comes alive through brand stories, culture, and creative campaign  Recruiting messaging  Fundraising messaging  Internal communications 28 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  28. 28. The Brand Platform Institutional Brand Promise (super-brand) SubBrands Brand Attributes Brand Attribute Matrix Verbal and visual vocabulary 29 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013 Tagline Elevator Speech Single Word Proof Points Brand Rationale Graphic Identity Creative Boards
  29. 29. Brand Platform - continued  Brand portfolio: An assemblage of your key brand elements into a cogent, integrated whole. The creation and use of a brand portfolio ensures brand continuity and promotes brand synergy  Brand promise: A pledge you make to your most important audiences to do a certain thing and/or act in a certain way. It is who you are and what you want to be known for. Also known as a positioning statement or USP  Brand rationale: A written explanation as to the logic behind your brand promise and why you believe your constituents will value it  A brand rationale is not an explanation of how the brand promise was created • Often includes supporting evidence, stories 30 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  30. 30. Brand Platform - continued  Sub-brands: Separate, complementary brands that are developed when the larger institutional brand is too broad to differentiate the benefits or unique attributes of a particular department or school  For example, sub-brands are created when a college or university wants to clearly associate an entity—such as a law school or football program—with the larger institution  Brand attributes: A series of words or phrases—implied in your brand promise—that you want to position in the minds of your most important target audiences  Over time, as a result of your brand communication plan, you want your most important audiences to repeat these attributes back to you, and to others. Words you want to “own” • Also known as benefit segments and vivid descriptors 31 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  31. 31. Brand Platform - continued  Brand attribute matrix: A set of institutional brand attributes that have been translated for such sub-brands as law schools or athletics  Single word you want to own  Tagline: The brand promise expressed in “shorthand” 32 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  32. 32. Brand Platform - continued  Elevator speech: A memorized statement that summarizes, in a meaningful way, the essence of your brand and your institution. This “speech” is given, usually verbally, when someone says, “tell me about your school”  Graphic identity: The visual, graphic portrayal of your institutional brand promise and attributes  Not to be confused with a brand identity which often has psychological and relational (associative) overtones  Creative boards: An initial creative idea that visually and verbally captures the flavor (essence) of the brand promise 33 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  33. 33. The Four Ps  # 1: Product  What is your product?  How does your product compare/compete with similar products from other colleges or universities?  Is your product in demand? How do you know?  Will students and donors overcome real and imagined barriers to exchange their values (time and money) for your product? Q What kinds of educational institutions tend to be more willing to customize their products? Why? 34 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  34. 34. A valued and differentiated product is the most important of all marketing assets 35 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  35. 35. Academic Program Marketability Assessment  Fine-tune your academic offerings to increase share and tuition revenue. Identify which programs to build/expand  Quality indicators:  Graduation rates by major  Student satisfaction within major  Job placement by major  Graduate school placement by major  Percentage of students employed in their major or in graduate school within six months of graduation  Demand indicators  Prospective student interest in major  Enrollment by major  Estimate of unused capacity by major  Job and employment trends  Percentage of top five competitors that offer this major 36 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  36. 36. 37 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  37. 37. Develop a Business Approach to New Majors  Four major decision areas:  Strategic  Marketplace  Economic and resource  Promotion 38 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  38. 38. The Four Ps - continued  # 2: Price  How much do you charge for your product?  Do all customers pay the same price?  How does this price compare with that of competing colleges or universities?  What are the dollar and non-dollar costs of your product? Q What are the dangers of positioning yourself on the $ variable? 39 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  39. 39. The Four Ps - continued  A big part of the cost equation is the relationship between perceived cost and perceived benefits What is your value proposition? Costs 40 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013 Benefits
  40. 40. The Four Ps - continued  # 3: Place (distribution)  Where are your programs offered?  Are people willing to take classes in those places and at those times?  Impact of asynchronous learning  Brick and click  What alternative delivery modes are available? 41 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  41. 41. The Four Ps - continued  # 4: Promotion  To what media are your audiences most likely to respond?  How do your promotional strategies compare with those used by your competition?  Remember the media mix? 42 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  42. 42. Iceberg Theory of Marketing Most people only “see” promotion Promotion Product Price Place But there’s really quite a bit more lurking below the surface 43 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  43. 43. Why Are We So Preoccupied With Promotion?  Few senior decision makers understand the difference between integrated marketing and promotion  Decision makers, faculty in particular, almost automatically assume that the problem cannot be related to product  “We are a …”  “We just need to get the word out!”  The Fifth and Sixth Ps: policy and politics  For the most part, product, price, and place issues are strategic and require the input of stakeholders  Promotion is usually tactical and of less interest to stakeholders 44 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  44. 44. The Four Cs (represents a major paradigm shift)  Customer (or consumer)  Not the product, but the customer; you can no longer simply sell what you want to produce, you must sell what customers want to buy  Within constraints of mission  Cost  The dollar and non-dollar costs the customer is willing to “pay” to meet a need or want  Convenience  Not place, but issues of “easiness” and access  Communication  Not merely promotion, but active listening and message customization 45 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  45. 45. We Are Hard Wired to Notice the Different 46 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  46. 46. Terms - continued  How are you different from your competitors in ways that target audiences value?  Differentiate along the four Ps 47 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  47. 47. Seeking Points of Differentiation Expecteds Drivers high in relevance, low in differentiation high in relevance, high in differentiation Neutrals Fool’s gold low in relevance, low in differentiation high in differentiation, low in relevance Source: McKinseyQuarterly.com 48 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  48. 48. Distinctive or Compelling? 49 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  49. 49. Terms - continued  Media mix: Mass and personal channels of communication and promotion  Many components of the media mix such as advertising, public relations, publications, and direct mail are often called “marketing” by the uninitiated 50 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  50. 50. Media Mix (enriched) Constituent relations: • Public • High school • Alumni • • • Donor Community Business Media work: • Homeowners • Features • Wild art Interactive media: • Web (social media, blogs, et al.) • Email Direct marketing (response marketing): • Telephone • Postal mail • Email Publications including variable digital printing/print on demand Sponsorships, publicity, event marketing Internal communication Collaborations, alliance marketing (co-branding) Word-of-mouth (buzz marketing) Facilities and environmentals: • Buildings and grounds • Signage and perimeter marking Traditional media (advertising): • Magazine and newspaper • TV/cable • Radio • Outdoor/out of home Engaged employees as media • Training 51 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  51. 51. It’s Only Communication if They Respond! 52 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  52. 52. Terms - continued  Image: A set of attitudes or beliefs that a person or audience holds about a college or university  An image is how you are perceived, not necessarily how you are  Because perceptions guide behavior, it is very important that you know how you are perceived by the audiences you value most  Institutions have multiple images  Images change over time  Moments of truth  Bricks and mortar 53 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  53. 53. Terms - continued Transmitting a Strong Image Image Formula = (Accuracy + Clarity + Consistency) x Continuity – Accuracy: Honest and provable – 95% who you are and 5% who you want to be – Clarity: Is your message understandable/memorable? – Consistency: Is everyone singing off the same song sheet? – Continuity: Over time 54 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  54. 54. Terms - continued  Positioning: The act of placing an institution in the mind of a prospective student or donor  Position statement – where you are now (based on research)  Positioning statement – where you want to be  Competitive positioning: Developing and communicating powerful and meaningful differences between your offerings and those of your competition Q When people hear your name, what do they think about? What are your vivid descriptors? 55 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  55. 55. Brand Association Web Internal External Academic reputation Friendly, engaging atmosphere Quality of faculty 80 34 51 Job and grad school placement success Value for the money 36 69 24 23 Breadth and quality of internships 65 44 Location Study abroad programs Campus amenities Note: Scores on each attribute are shown from the most recent execution . Scores indicate the extent to which the brand is associated with the indicated attribute. Scores range from 1 (lowest) to 100 (highest). 56 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  56. 56. Integrated Marketing  Firm commitment to the Four Cs (or Four Ps)  Horizontal integration  Brand marketing  Direct marketing  CEM  Internal communication  Vertical integration  Strategic  Organizational including internal communication  Message  Active listening and remembering  Database dependent  gather and act on data  Ongoing evaluation and modification 57 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  57. 57. Is Everyone on the Senior Team Rowing Together 58 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  58. 58. Many marketing problems are actually political problems in disguise 59 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  59. 59. Organizational Integration President Vice President for Market Relations Academic Vice President Db Manager Marketing Public Relations Publications Student Recruiting Advertising 60 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013 Web Student Services Advancement Alumni Fund-raising Vice President for Finance
  60. 60. When You Can’t Change the Organization  Adopt an ad hoc, team-based approach  The integrated marketing team (IMT)  Teams vs. committees or taskforces Organization 61 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  61. 61. Centralized or Decentralized  Lately, a question we are routinely asked is whether marketing functions should be centralized or decentralized  In most cases, the answer is both  Coordinated under one plan, with the larger institutions in mind: – The brand function (awareness) is centralized – The direct marketing function (generating response) is decentralized in functional units  Recruiting  Fundraising  Special events 62 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  62. 62. Message Integration  Involves coordinating all messages so they share a common look, sound, and feel across different media and audience segments  Sometimes termed integrated marketing communication (IMC)  Extension of the old “family look” 63 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  63. 63. A Market-Oriented Institution …  Embraces a comprehensive definition of marketing  Recognizes marketplace dynamics  You do compete, you are compared:  Students  Donated dollars  Public and media attention  Is driven by transforming, compelling vision  Nanus and Albrecht 64 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  64. 64. The Importance of Vision Burt Nanus defines vision as “a realistic, credible, attractive future for your organization” There is no more powerful engine driving an organization toward excellence and long-range success than an attractive, worthwhile, and achievable vision of the future that is widely shared Karl Albrecht uses a metaphor, “the northbound train,” to describe how important vision is to an organization Albrecht says that the image of a northbound train conveys an unwavering commitment to a particular direction The idea of a moving train also conveys a strong sense of momentum, of unstoppable, implacable movement in an unambiguous direction 65 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  65. 65. Market-oriented Institution - continued  Audience centric and not institutional centric  Uses new definitions of quality and success  Less emphasis on edifices and finances and more emphasis on student outcomes  Embraces a culture of “Now!”  A sense of entrepreneurship  Risk taking is encouraged  An attitude of immediacy  Understand the too-high cost of perfect decisions and plans  Consensus is not a goal  Focus on fixing problems and not affixing blame  Individual and group accountability  A commitment to followership 66 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  66. 66. Market-oriented institution - continued  Stresses data-based decision making  A willingness to collect, analyze, and act on objective information Database is a state of mind  Features variability of product, price, place, and promotion based on customer needs and expectations  Establishes return on investment (ROI) criteria a priori 67 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  67. 67. Developing an Integrated Marketing Plan 68 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  68. 68. Developing an Integrated Marketing Plan 1. Lay the foundation 2. Undertake a situation analysis 3. Define target audiences 4. Settle vivid descriptors 5. Refine your target geography 6. Establish marketing goals 7. Write marketing action plans 8. Assemble and debug the plan 9. Execute and evaluate 69 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  69. 69. Integrated Marketing Plan Outline  Mission statement   Vision statement  Planning assumptions  Situation analysis (prioritized)  SWOT  OT  Prioritized target audiences  Prioritized marketing goals  IM  Four Ps  IMC  Brand  Direct  Internal Marketing action plans (MAPs)  Short-term  Long-term  Vivid descriptors  (Brand attributes)  Budgets  Target geographies  Timelines/GANTT charts 70 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  70. 70. The Final Written Plan  While your final plan can take a variety of shapes and forms, this general outline will work in most instances – Mission – Vision – Planning assumptions – Situation analysis (prioritized) – Prioritized target audiences – Vivid descriptors – Target geographies – Prioritized marketing/communication goals – Action plans for year one – Budget – Timeline 71 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013 1 ½ 1 3 ½ ½ ½ 1 15–20 1–2 1–2 page page page pages page page page page pages pages pages
  71. 71. The Parking Garage 72 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  72. 72. 73 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  73. 73. More Than Dollars…Will  Many college and university administrators believe that the biggest     requirement for a successful brand marketing strategy is cash While you will spend dollars, there is another currency that is even more important than dollars: institutional will For a brand marketing strategy to be successful, you must have the institutional will to conduct the research and respond strategically A critical element of brand marketing, therefore, is the decision to focus outward rather than inward, the decision to first understand and then respond to customers One final word about dollars: You will spend dollars to create and maintain a brand  More than new dollars, you will spend coordinated dollars, dollars already being spent; now coordinated—and maximized—under one overarching brand marketing strategy 74 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  74. 74. People and Groups  The champion: The spark or true believer (the visionary)  The sponsor: Runs interference for the champion  The large steering committee or task force: The politically appointed planning team; largely ineffectual as a true planning body  Transition to advisory group status  The planning team: The champion and the team who actually do the heavy lifting ̶ Involved with both developing and implementing the brand 75 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  75. 75. The President as Sponsor  The president is the chief marketing officer. The signals he/she sends—to senior staff, middle managers, and faculty—will telegraph whether marketing is a legitimate institutional commitment  As such, the president must:  Have a vision for how marketing can help the institution. Without this personal           vision there will never be personal commitment Commit his or her power and prestige to the marketing efforts Commit institutional time, talent, and treasure Make tough decisions in a timely fashion Provide authority to the chief marketing officer, department, and/or team Convey that marketing is an institution-wide commitment and responsibility Clear away organizational and policy roadblocks Insist on shared goals and resources among senior administrators/staffs Go toe-to-toe with recalcitrant administrators Demand departmental and even individual accountability Be the champion’s sponsor 76 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  76. 76. Campus Involvement  Key issues:  If your plan involves the public declaration of previously settled core values, then there is less need for campus engagement  If your plan involves the clarification of core values, then there will be a greater need for campus engagement 77 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  77. 77. Key Steps in Engaging the Campus       Help the campus community understand the process Clarify their role in the process Build their confidence in the process (solid defendable research) Give the campus community access to the process Clarify the role of campus members in executing the plan Aggressively communicate outcomes 78 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  78. 78. Finalize the Marketing Mandate  At this point you must completely understand the president’s marketing mandate (what he or she hopes to see the plan accomplish)  If you do not have a clear understanding of the president’s mandate, it will be very difficult to keep the planning process on track  It is against this mandate that your president will examine:       Target audiences Vivid descriptors (brand attributes) Target geography Marketing goals Individual action plans Budget 79 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  79. 79. Foundation - continued  Designate a champion To succeed, your marketing efforts must have a champion who is: Knowledgeable Trusted/Respected Powerful Passionate about marketing It is almost always a mistake to have the marketing effort driven from “below” 80 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  80. 80. Foundation - continued  Assemble and build the marketing team  While the exact composition of the marketing team will change depending on the marketing mandate, most marketing teams include someone (or someones) from the following areas:  Public relations  Recruiting and admissions  Academics/faculty  Student services  Advancement and alumni  Institutional research  Athletics  Finance office  Don’t forget a secretary/coordinator/document handler  Will also need to learn the planning software 81 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  81. 81. Remember…  The job of individual team members is to investigate and represent the interests of their stakeholders and constituents  They need to conduct:  Conversations and interviews  Review of secondary data  Document review  Quantitative research  Focus groups 82 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  82. 82. Foundation - continued Two Tensions Keep the Team Size Manageable Spread Ownership  The Key: Keep the actual planning team small and:  Have it periodically report to larger campus-wide advisory team  Have the smaller planning team serve as liaison to larger campus community 83 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  83. 83. Remember: While everyone may not be on the marketing team, the interests of everyone in the campus community must be presented by someone on the marketing team. 84 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  84. 84. Typical Response to Marketing Proposals No Perhaps 85 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013 Possibly Yes
  85. 85. Questions That Must Be Answered  If you can’t get the following questions answered, proceed cautiously  What is the president’s mandate?  Clear, definite, articulated, shared, and reasonable?  Who is the champion?  How long will the plan run?  Minimum of three years  What is the budget?  Sustainable over plan’s life 86 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  86. 86. Step Two: Undertake a Situation Analysis  A situation analysis (SA) is a systematic evaluation of your institution and its environment from a marketing perspective  Most SAs use one of two models:  SWOT  Strengths: Internal qualities upon which you can capitalize  Weaknesses: Inherent flaws, something to be overcome  Opportunities: Things in your environment of which you can take advantage  Threats: Dangers in your marketplace that could cause you problems  PO  Major problems (internal and external) facing the institution  Major opportunities (internal and external) facing the institution  Your president’s mandate should provide the basic direction of the SA 87 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  87. 87. Situation analysis - continued  External/Environmental Analysis  Linkages and exchange relationships with important publics  Opportunities for sponsorships and collaborations  How the institution is perceived by external publics  Local, regional, national, and even international demographic, economic, and employment trends  Met and unmet needs  Institutions with which you compete for:  Students  Donated dollars  Media attention  Others? 88 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  88. 88. Situation analysis - continued  Internal/Institutional Analysis  Appropriateness of mission and vision  Quality of leadership  Campus climate  Existing planning documents  Market research  Recruiting and fundraising programs  How the institution is perceived by internal audiences  Product, price, place, and promotion (or customer, cost, convenience, and communication) strategies  Facilities and physical plant  Communication strategies  Others? 89 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  89. 89. Time Out for Research  Your initial situation analysis may reveal that you need to take a time-out to do some research  Do you know enough about the audiences suggested by your president’s mandate?  Perceptions  VALs  Interests  Media habits  Opportunities to serve  Research must be  Legitimate  Timely  Date needed to establish baseline 90 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  90. 90. Possible Research Studies  Recruiting and retention  General prospects  Noninquirers  Nonapplicants  Nonmatriculants  Influencers (parents, guidance  General  Faculty and staff  Movers and shakers  Media  Church leaders  Legislators  Business leaders  Community residents  Peer institutions  Environmental  Demographic  Economic  Job trends  Competitive analysis counselors, club advisors)  Current students  Withdrawing  Fundraising  Alumni  Current donors  Former donors 91 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  91. 91. Research Cycle  Studies done annually     Studies done every two years     Studies done every three years    92 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  92. 92. Managing the Situation Analysis  Options for input:  Administrative  Staff  Faculty  Student  Alumni  Input options:  Surveys  Focus groups and forums  Ads in student newspaper  Personal interviews  Bulletin boards and Internet  Important issues:  Confidentiality  Anonymity Goal: As much input/ownership as possible 93 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  93. 93. Possible SWOT/PO Questions  What do you feel are your greatest strengths or assets?  Which of your qualities do you think prospective students and donors value most?  Students?  Donors?  What are the most significant recruiting and/or marketing opportunities and challenges facing you?  Opportunities?  Challenges?  If you had the responsibility, and a reasonable budget, what marketing/recruiting strategies would you immediately initiate?  If you could change one aspect of your institution, what would it be? 94 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  94. 94. Sample PO  Liberal arts college in Kentucky  Problems  Changing demography  Perception of college as a commodity  The demands of information technology  The dual commitment to quality and accessibility  Opportunities  Changing demography  The liberal arts and sciences experience  The XXYYZZ “experience”  Our national reputation 95 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  95. 95. As You Develop Your Situation Analysis, Keep in Mind … Circle of Concern Things you really can’t do anything about Source: Covey 96 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013 Circle of Influence Things you can change
  96. 96. Pay-off Matrix  As you struggle with reviewing the range of possible strategic issues, it is easy to get lost in the minutiae  Juran’s the “vital few and the trivial many”  Focus on those things that will help you directly address your president’s mandate 97 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  97. 97. Step Three: Define Target Audiences  Target audiences  A target audience is the person or group whose behavior or attitude you want to change or whom you wish to influence or inform  Define target audiences by  Age  Geography  Household income  Ethnicity  VALs  Others? 98 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  98. 98. Possible Audiences Students Donors Others Alumni Faculty Prospective students Current donors Staff Nonmatriculants Former donors Administrators Withdrawing students Prospective donors Parents Foundations (remember, focus) Current students • Undergraduate • Of color • Talented/gifted • Graduate • Continuing ed • International • Distance ed High school influencers Business leaders Board members Community members Church and religious leaders Government leaders/officials 99 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  99. 99. Decision Point – Target Audiences  Limit yourself to a handful of target audiences in year one; add others in subsequent years  Audiences must “mesh” with president’s mandate  Before proceeding, the president must sign off on the target audiences 100 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  100. 100. Guiding the Discussion on Vivid Descriptors  Keep them simple; avoid lengthy dialogue  May need to translate for key customers and stakeholders:  How do different target audiences define “academic quality?”  Remember, not all target audiences will be interested in all descriptors (remember, segment the message mix)  Illustrate your descriptors in ways that your audiences find meaningful 101 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  101. 101. What Five Words Do You Want to Own  What five words/phrases/descriptors do you want to own? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 102 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  102. 102. Descriptors - continued  Vivid descriptors must emanate from your mission and vision  Because they represent core values, they are long-term and enduring Your vivid descriptors will become the central themes for taglines, advertising, publications, media relations, and other media 103 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  103. 103. Decision Point – Vivid Descriptors  Just as you limited the number of target audiences, you must limit the number of vivid descriptors to four or five  Keep them simple (or else they won’t be vivid)  Vivid descriptors must be consistent with the president’s mandate  The president must sign off on the vivid descriptors 104 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  104. 104. Step Five: Refine Your Target Geography  Primary and secondary markets  Think “small” (or in other words, focus)  Analyze support structures  Feeder high schools  Alumni clubs  Population centers  Airline hubs  Athletic conferences  Analyze data  Competitors  Image “fall-off”  Consider geospatial mapping 105 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  105. 105. 106 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  106. 106. Decision Point – Target Geography  Think “just big enough”  Watch out for institutional ego  Geography should represent key overlaps  The president must sign off on the target geography 107 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  107. 107. Step Six: Establish Marketing Goals  Marketing goals  A goal is the thing you want to accomplish (often called “objectives”)  Integrated marketing communication (IMC) goals are designed to:  Create awareness (brand)  Generate a response (direct)  Sample IMC goal: Within two years, increase the percentage of high school students within a 50-mile radius of Williamsburg who can identify one or more of our brand attributes from seven percent to 17 percent  Integrated marketing goals address the Four Ps  Sample IM goal: Increase the first-year-to-second-year retention rate from 66% to 75% over a three-year period 108 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  108. 108. Goals - continued  Goals, audiences, and action plans  Goal:  Within two years, increase the percentage of high school students within a 50- mile radius of Williamsburg who can identify one or more of our brand attributes from seven percent to 17 percent  Target audience: Prospective students that fit our profile  Action plans (sometimes called strategies or tactics):  Determine which high schools have students that fit your profile  Identify your graduates that work in those high schools  Develop talking points for graduates and recruiters (compare and contrast)  Place quarterly full-page ads in regional high school papers  Conduct quarterly mailing to alumni parents within target geography  “Match” college faculty with high school faculty  Send student “stars” back to their high schools 109 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  109. 109. General Marketing Goal Topics  Depending on your mandate, marketing goals are generally drawn from one or more of the following strategic areas:  Finance  Marketing  Brand, direct, internal  Recruiting  Student services  Retention  Customer service  Facilities  Technology  Programs (academic mix issues)  Quality  Array  Fundraising  Human resources 110 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  110. 110. Sample Goals – You Be the Judge  Of the following six goals, which are strategic goals (what) and which are tactical actions (how)? What else is missing from these goals? 1. Increase awareness and communication to residents and students in the district 2. Plan and execute a minimum of four events to increase awareness of the programs and services the college offers 3. Develop a prospective student database 4. Work with Institutional Research to utilize research tools to measure marketing effectiveness 5. Develop and implement a comprehensive marketing plan for the high school component of the Online to College program 6. Improve and expand the district web presence 111 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  111. 111. One Year, Two Years, Three Years or More Year One Year Two Year Three Marketing Goals 1. 2. Brand Recruiting UG 1. 2. 3. Brand Recruiting UG Annual fund 1. 2. 3. 4. Brand Recruiting UG Annual fund Recruiting grad Target Audiences 1. Prospective UG students High school influencers Prospective donors Parents Business leaders 1. Prospective UG students High school influencers Prospective donors Parents Business leaders Former donors Regional media 1. Prospective UG students High school influencers Prospective donors Parents Business leaders Former donors Regional media Community residents 2. 3. 4. 5. 112 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.
  112. 112. Goals – continued You are much more likely to be judged for the things you failed to do than for the things you accomplished. Under-promise and over-deliver If at all possible, delay politically sensitive goals until the second year of the plan. This will allow you to build on the credibility you established during the plan’s first year of operation 113 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  113. 113. Decision Point – Marketing Goals  Are your goals: – – – – Important? Believable? Achievable? Consistent with your president’s mandate?  The president must sign off on the marketing goals 114 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  114. 114. Step Seven: Write Marketing Action Plans  Marketing action plan (MAP)  A marketing action plan outlines the activities that are designed to accomplish or help accomplish a goal  Who does what, when?  How they fit together  The goal is the thing you want done  The target audience is the people at whom the goal is directed  The marketing action plan is how you accomplish the goal 115 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  115. 115. Action Plan Template 1. Goal to be supported: ______________________________________ 2. Description of action plan: __________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ 3. Target audiences 1. Audience A: ______________________________ 2. Audience B: ______________________________ 3. Audience C: ______________________________ 4. Begin date: ____________ End date: ____________ 5. Budget: _____________  Request for new dollars  Reallocated from my budget  Reallocated from other budget 6. Assigned to: _____________________ 7. How/when evaluate: ________________________ 116 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  116. 116. Dissecting a Marketing Action Plan Description of Marketing Action Plan Create a media database of all print and broadcast media writers/reporters within a 100-mile radius of the institution Which goal does this MAP support? Within two years, increase the percentage of high school students within a 50-mile radius of Williamsburg who can identify one or more of our vivid descriptors Target audiences Regional editors and writers MAP (step-by-step) • Buy directories (1/15) • Select database software (1/30) • Input data (3/15) Begin date 1/15 End date 3/15 Budget $1,600 MAP assigned to Bob S. 117 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  117. 117. Sample GANTT Chart Source: Marketing Calendar 118 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  118. 118. Action Plan Exercise  As a group, let’s complete action plans for the following goals:  Goal: Increase the annual fund contribution rate from 23% to 40% over a five-year period  Action:  Action:  Action:  Goal: Increase the number of adult students from 180 to 240 over a three-year period  Action:  Action:  Action: 119 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  119. 119. Step Eight: Assemble and Debug the Plan  Does the plan focus on the president’s mandate?  Are you spending priority time and money on priority goals?  Does the plan shake hands with existing plans? - Strategic - Recruiting     - Advancement - Marketing Is there a clear delineation of who is doing what? Does it have a strong internal communication component? Does it meet the overall budget goal? Is there a solid, workable timeline? 120 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  120. 120. Step Nine: Execute and Evaluate (and Learn)  Just do it  Monitor budgets and timelines  If an important goal is stalled, be willing to reallocate resources  Time  Money  What can we quit doing? Q How do you evaluate the plan’s effectiveness? How do you know when to update your plan? 121 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  121. 121. Execute and evaluate – continued  Evaluate and learn  Provide data for mid-course corrections  Determine the effectiveness of completed strategies   • Demonstrate effectiveness • Adjust plans for next year • Gain credibility To evaluate and learn  Brand: repeat research studies to measure progress against the baseline  Direct: measure response Marketing progresses according to the quality of its measurement tools 122 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  122. 122. Budgeting  The budget will be directly affected by the scope of the mandate  Remember:  Don’t begin something you can’t sustain  Anticipate that your marketing efforts will heat up the marketplace  It is more about coordinating existing dollars than new dollars 123 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  123. 123. Factors That Impact Your Marketing Budget  Will require more marketing $  Will require less marketing $  No strategic direction  Active alumni  Large, political marketing committee  Strong or well-known athletic program  Weak champion  Narrow focus and reasonable goals  No integration  Timely decision making  No baseline data  Smaller target geography  Can’t make a decision  Fewer target audiences  Highly competitive marketplace  Smaller target geography  Expensive media market  Open position  More target audiences  More valued position  Contested position  Simple position  Less valued position  Complex position 124 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  124. 124. Apportioning Marketing Dollars 70-20-10 125 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  125. 125. Change the Emphasis  In the old days (last year) 10% of the creative dollar was spent on the idea and 90% on the placement  Now, the emphasis is on the idea and if the idea is good enough, the placement is free 126 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  126. 126. Who Is Responsible?  Marketing begins with strategic vision on how marketing can help  Usually this is from the president  The president must  Establish a clear institutional direction  Enact enabling policy and remove organizational roadblocks  Allocate realistic resources  Link programs to budgets  Provide authority  Assign responsibility  The president can demand results  Commitment is spelled $ 127 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  127. 127. Planning Postmortem  A postmortem recognizes that planning is an ongoing process  The postmortem is designed to help you evaluate the planning process you just completed so that your next planning cycle will be more effective and efficient  Talk to the team  Talk to the folks your team represents 128 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  128. 128. Final Question Based on this presentation, and your experiences at your institution, what ducks do you need to get in a row before you can begin the planning process? 1. 2. 3. 129 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  129. 129. Books by Bob Sevier Available from strategypublishing.com 130 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013
  130. 130. Good Promotional and Brand Spots http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2udiWBzETJg http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ijeg-jeTUBs http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jboRPUGR MJY http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9y7N4n_ Avs http://www.youtube.com/user/lyndapodcast http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jme8jQUdI b8 131 | Building an Effective Integrated Marketing Plan | © STAMATS 2013

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