Invasion Of Participatory Culture

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If you haven’t made the shift from serving members to involving them, consider this your wake-up call — and your roadmap.

Sociologists identify today’s online networked individuals as the participatory class. For many adults, the Internet primarily means the web. For others it means chat, connecting with friends, email, games, movies, social networks, text, video — all of which means they are content producers.

As part of a participatory culture, we expect to create, collaborate, connect, share, and learn interactively. We feel that our contributions matter. We share a social or emotional connection with one another that helps solve problems and develop new solutions. It’s a culture that permeates our personal lives and our workplaces.

Published in: Technology, Business

Invasion Of Participatory Culture

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  6. mean to you? 7
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  8. Hundreds of thousands of people it meansEmailChatGamesSocial ConnectionsTexting 9
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  13. Sociologistscall this
  14. A Participatory Culture Has 19
  15. A Participatory Culture Has• Low barriers to expression & civic engagement 20
  16. A Participatory Culture Has• Low barriers to expression & civic engagement• Support for creating & sharing content 21
  17. A Participatory Culture Has• Low barriers to expression & civic engagement• Support for creating & sharing content• Informal mentorship where veterans pass on knowledge & experiences to novices Henry Jenkins, MIT 22
  18. The Participatory ClassThe concept of networked individualismreconfigures users’ access toinformation, people and otherresources 23
  19. The Participatory Classallows them to move across,undermine and go beyond theboundaries of existing institutions 24
  20. The Participatory Classto seek and enforce new levels ofinstitutional and personaltransparency William Dutton, Oxford Internet Institute 25
  21. From command & controlto collaboration and co-creationFrom command and control to collaboration and co-creation From broadcast production to peer production From mass production to customized segmentation From closed improvements to open innovation
  22. From broadcast productionto peer production
  23. From mass productionto customized segmentation
  24. From closed improvementsto open innovation
  25. What doesthis mean to your org?
  26. 82%
  27. What doesthis mean to your org?
  28. Systems of Record
  29. Systems ofEngagement
  30. Be Conversational Online
  31. Listen LearnEngageOnline
  32. Extend relationships Online Touch tactfully Touch often
  33. Employ pull methods
  34. Participatory Culture has changed the Member-scape
  35. Disruption: Evolving Models OfEngagement And Support April 2011 Monitor Institute
  36. Benefits traditional membership not adequate to engage Millennials
  37. Value proposition is not clearValue propositionnot clear
  38. Quid Pro Quo not of value
  39. SporadicParticipation with traditionalorgs event or activity based
  40. Millennialswant to influence & act on their own or with friends
  41. How will your org attractMillennials?
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  43. Traditional Associations adopt push economy Push • Hierarchical • From center out to others • Traditional 51
  44. Traditional Associations adopt push economy Push • Hierarchical • From center out to others • Traditional • Program • Mandated • Formal • Traditional 52
  45. Today Shift To Pull Economy Push Pull • Hierarchical • Networked • From center out • Decentralized • Traditional • Innovative • Program • Platform • Mandated • Self-Service • Formal • Informal 53
  46. Push Economies Push EconomiesAnticipate members needs 54
  47. Push Economies Push EconomiesAnticipate members needsSilos create standardized productsprograms and services 55
  48. Push Economies Push EconomiesAnticipate members needsSilos create standardized productsprograms and servicesBroadcast methods 56
  49. Push Economies Push EconomiesMass consumption 57
  50. Push Economies Push EconomiesMass consumptionResources to mass production 58
  51. Push Economies Push EconomiesMass consumptionResources to mass productionOne size fits all 59
  52. Push Economies Push EconomiesMost successful when membersdon„t know what they want 60
  53. Push Economies Push EconomiesHuge overhead costs in admin for growth 61
  54. Push Economies Push EconomiesDifficulty with innovation and growth 62
  55. Pull Economies Pull Economies Decentralized networksDecentralized networks Customized products Segmented audiences Focus on Demand-Driven Needs Agile Flexible Respond fast Win loyal members through speed & quality Best practices openly & freely shared Maximizes enthusaism of members 63
  56. Pull Economies Pull Economies Decentralized networksDecentralized networks Customized products Segmented audiencesCustomized products, services Focus on Demand-Driven Needs Agile Flexible Respond fast Win loyal members through speed & quality Best practices openly & freely shared Maximizes enthusaism of members 64
  57. Pull Economies Pull Economies Decentralized networksDecentralized networks Customized products Segmented audiencesCustomized products, services Focus on Demand-Driven NeedsSegmented audiences Agile Flexible Respond fast Win loyal members through speed & quality Best practices openly & freely shared Maximizes enthusaism of members 65
  58. Pull Economies Pull Economies Decentralized networksFocus on demand-driven needs Customized products Segmented audiences Focus on Demand-Driven Needs Agile Flexible Respond fast Win loyal members through speed & quality Best practices openly & freely shared Maximizes enthusaism of members 66
  59. Pull Economies Pull Economies Decentralized networksFocus on demand-driven needs Customized products Segmented audiencesAgile, flexile, respond fast Focus on Demand-Driven Needs Agile Flexible Respond fast Win loyal members through speed & quality Best practices openly & freely shared Maximizes enthusaism of members 67
  60. Pull Economies Pull Economies Decentralized networksFocus on demand-driven needs Customized products Segmented audiencesAgile, flexile, respond fast Focus on Demand-Driven NeedsWin loyal members through Agile Flexible speed and quality Respond fast Win loyal members through speed & quality Best practices openly & freely shared Maximizes enthusaism of members 68
  61. Pull Economies Pull Economies Decentralized networksBest practices are openly Customized products Segmented audiences freely shared and Focus on Demand-Driven Needs Agile Flexible Respond fast Win loyal members through speed & quality Best practices openly & freely shared Maximizes enthusaism of members 69
  62. Pull Economies Pull Economies Decentralized networksBest practices are openly Customized products Segmented audiences freely shared and Focus on Demand-Driven NeedsMaximizes enthusiasm of Agile Flexible members Respond fast Win loyal members through speed & quality Best practices openly & freely shared Maximizes enthusaism of members 70
  63. Pull EconomiesBuilt on Knowledge Sharing Collaborative Efforts Trust 71
  64. Pull EconomiesBuilt on Tacit Knowledge Intangible value is steered towards common sharing 72
  65. How can your orgtransition to PullEconomies?
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  67. Participatory Culture 75
  68. Today‟s networked individualemerging class of citizensParticipatory Class 76
  69. Associations musttransition to 77
  70. 1) Participatory MembersInternet changed how we alllearn, play, socializeengage in life
  71. Participatory MembersCommonplace, not exoticProcess, not product
  72. Participatory membersNot passiveAbout conversationscomments, engagement
  73. 2) Presumed AuthorityTo Collective Credibility Communal Democratic 81
  74. Presumed Authority to Collective Credibility Problem solving via groups Interdisciplinary 82
  75. Presumed Authority to Collective Credibility Helping members learn skills to address different POVs 83
  76. • What barriers exist to keep you from moving to this model? 84
  77. • What role do Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) play in this model? 85
  78. 3) Horizontal Structures Less authoritative, top-downKnowledge gap between leader members shrunk86
  79. Horizontal StructuresCollaboration, teamwork,problem solving, co-creation 87
  80. Horizontal StructuresEmphasis on Peer to Peer 88
  81. 4) Variety of Formal & InformalInformal Learning Opps80% learning - informalMove from push to pull methods 89
  82. Formal & InformalNovice workers Mature (5-10 yrs) Experienced >10 yrsDirected Self-Directed Helping OthersClass Discovery CoachingCourse Searching (Google) Mentoring 90 Source: Jay Cross’ Working Smarter
  83. Formal & InformalNovice workers Mature (5-10 yrs) Experienced >10 yrsDirected Self-Directed Helping OthersClass Discovery CoachingCourse Searching (Google) MentoringLecture Trial-and-error StorytellingTest/Exam Collaborating Giving Feedback1 Right Answer Asking Nurturing 91 Source: Jay Cross’ Working Smarter
  84. Formal & InformalNovice workers Mature (5-10 yrs) Experienced >10 yrsDirected Self-Directed Helping OthersClass Discovery CoachingCourse Searching (Google) MentoringLecture Trial-and-error StorytellingTest/Exam Collaborating Giving Feedback1 Right Answer Asking NurturingCurriculum Skimming ModelingListening Observing ReflectingInstructions Conversing Connecting 92 Source: Jay Cross’ Working Smarter
  85. • What must we do differently to encourage this? 93
  86. Formal & InformalNovice workers Mature (5-10 yrs) Experienced >10 yrsDirected Self-Directed Helping OthersClass Discovery CoachingCourse Searching (Google) MentoringLecture Trial-and-error StorytellingTest/Exam Collaborating Giving Feedback1 Right Answer Asking NurturingCurriculum Skimming ModelingListening Observing ReflectingInstructions Conversing Connecting 94 Source: Jay Cross’ Working Smarter
  87. 5) Networked Learning Learning is social Conversational & partnering 95
  88. Networked LearningEmphasizes flexibility/outcomes Mobilizing networks Assertive to enabling 96
  89. • How can you encourage more participant dialogue & conversations at your conferences and in your education? 97
  90. 6) Interactive & w/out WallsLife-long learningFree Wi-FiEncouraging socialsharing 98
  91. 6) Interactive & w/out WallsMany-to-multitudesEngages those not presentExtends messages 99
  92. 6) Interactive & w/out WallsExtends ideas, practicesfor bettermentOf Profession & Industry 100
  93. We serve Our Members Best By Serving Our Industry First 101
  94. How does this statement impact youreducation? Do you agree? Disagree?Why?“We serve our members best by serving our industry first.” 102
  95. 1) Participatory Members1. To participatory learning2. From presumed authority to collective credibility3. To more horizontal structures 103
  96. 1) Participatory Members2) Presumed AuthorityTo Collective Credibility1. To participatory learning2. From presumed authority to collective credibility3. To more horizontal structures 104
  97. 1) Participatory Learning2) Presumed AuthorityTo Collective Credibility1. To participatory learning3) Horizontal Structures2. From presumed authority to collective credibility3. To more horizontal structures 105
  98. 4) Formal & Informal1. To participatory learning2. From presumed authority to collective credibility3. To more horizontal structures 106
  99. 4) Formal & Informal5) Networked Learning1. To participatory learning2. From presumed authority to collective credibility3. To more horizontal structures 107
  100. 4) Formal & Informal5) Networked Learning6) Interactive & w/o walls1. To participatory learning2. From presumed authority to collective credibility3. To more horizontal structures 108
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  104. • I am marlon • Fras1977• Will Montague • RickyDavid• iammikeb • RickyDavid• ~jjjohn~ • s myers• I am marlon • mkorchia• R. Duran • togni.franco• Fenix_21 • Curtis Gregory Perry• McBeth • EJP Photo• Johnny Jupiter • huffmans• AndrewKW • erroltookaphoto• abbilder • Josh Liba• Ms Kels • artie*• Kraftwerk • Melanctha
  105. jhurt@velvetchainsaw.com velvetchainsaw.com @JeffHurt

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