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Boom! 5 Ed Disruptors For Your Conferences

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Brain science is not a fad and neither is online learning. The more we learn about how we learn, the more opportunities we have to provide more meaningful and lasting learning experiences for attendees at our meetings and events. Explore a few top education innovations happening in all walks (including K-12, universities, the digital space, library science, adult education and on-the-job-learning) extract their core nuggets of wisdom and “translate” them for application to our world of conference and professional learning.

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Boom! 5 Ed Disruptors For Your Conferences

  1. Photo by supershaggy - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License https://www.flickr.com/photos/99888853@N00 Created with Haiku Deck
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  10. Which of these LOs are important to you? 10 Your Turn
  11. 1. Identify five education disruptors and innovations. 2. Discuss how to apply these trends to the learning design of your sessions. 3. Discover strategies to improve your attendees’ ability to learn, retain and apply information. 11
  12. A. Wide Spacing Each key concept is repeated—in a well-designed manner—once in the 1st 30 minutes, once in the 2nd 30 minutes, and once in last 30 minutes. B. Narrow Spacing Each key concept is repeated—in a well-designed manner—each within its own 30 minute block.. C. Both will create about the same level of remembering Which design is most likely to help them remember what they learned? You’re teaching your session attendees really critical information that they’ll be able to use in their jobs. You are engaged with them in a 90-minute session on Wednesday— the first day of a three- day conference. You decide to repeat 3 key concepts to ensure they are remembered.
  13. A. Wide Spacing Each key concept is repeated—in a well-designed manner—once in the 1st 30 minutes, once in the 2nd 30 minutes, and once in last 30 minutes. B. Narrow Spacing Each key concept is repeated—in a well-designed manner—each within its own 30 minute block.. C. Both will create about the same level of remembering Which design is most likely to help them remember what they learned?1st 30 2nd 30 3rd 30 Topic A Topic B Topic C Topic A Topic B Topic C Topic A Topic B Topic C Topic A Topic A Topic A Topic B Topic B Topic B Topic C Topic C Topic C
  14. “The spacing effect is one of the oldest and best documented phenomena in the history of learning and memory research.” Harry Bahrick & Lynda Hall Journal of Memory and Language So, why don’t we use it more?
  15. Krug, D., Davis, T. B., & Glover, J. A. (1990). Massed versus distributed repeated reading: A case of forgetting helping recall? Journal of Educational Psychology, 82, 366-371. Research Example 0 10 20 30 40 Immediate Repetition Spaced Repetition
  16. Research Example Karpicke, J.D. & Roediger, H.L. (2007). Expanding retrieval practice promotes short-term retention, but equally spaced retrieval enhances long-term retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 33, 704-719. 0 10 20 30 40 50 No Spacing Expanding Spacing Equal Spacing
  17. Research Example Dellarosa, D., & Bourne, L. E. (1985). Surface form and the spacing effect. Memory & Cognition, 13, 529-537. From Experiment 1. 10 20 30 40 50 60 Single Presentation Non-Spaced Repetition Spaced Repetition Widely- Spaced Repetition
  18. 1st Event 2nd Event 3rd Event Learning 1 week Retention Memory Retrieval Performance 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Spacing is helpful in minimizing the forgetting curve.
  19. 1st Event 2nd Event 3rd Event Conference Session 1 week Retention Memory Retrieval Performance 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Spacing is helpful in minimizing the forgetting curve.
  20. Subscription Learning Learners Subscribe or are Subscribed Many Learning Events Spaced Over Time Usually Short Nuggets Usually Relies on Push Technology Usually Utilizes the Spacing Effect
  21. Subscription-Learning Course Short segments spread over time September October November Nugget Nugget Nugget Nugget Nugget Nugget Nugget Nugget Nugget Nugget Nugget Nugget Nugget Nugget Nugget Nugget Nugget Nugget To Learn More: SubscriptionLearning.com
  22. Photo by Juliana Coutinho - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/10217810@N05 Created with Haiku Deck How can you use spacing and/or subscription learning at your conferences?
  23. Subscription-Learning App wins App of the Year!
  24. Blog Post – http://is.gd/QMINDshareSL
  25. INVITATION Jeff & Will cordially invite you to: Subscription-Learning 2-month pilot… www.is.gd/pcma_jeff_will
  26. What level of expertise do your conference presenters have about Human Learning? They know the topic so well they could teach it. They know the topic well, but could learn more. They know a modest amount. They know a little. They don’t need to know it. They can look it up on Wikipedia
  27. Photo by Juliana Coutinho - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/10217810@N05 Created with Haiku Deck What level of expertise about human learning do your speakers have?
  28. “It has long been recognized that traditional, stand-up lectures are an inefficient and unengaging strategy for imparting new knowledge and skills.” (p. 86) “Recent reports suggest that information and demonstrations (i.e., workbooks, lectures, and videos) remain the strategies of choice in industry. And this is a problem [because] we know from the body of research that learning occurs through the practice and feedback components.” (p. 86) http://is.gd/TrainingResearch2012
  29. Engagement & Understanding Remembering Application The Decisive Dozen for Learning Design and Learning Measurement http://is.gd/ddResearch Baseline 1. Content 2. Exposure 3. Guiding Attention 4. Creating Correct Conceptions 5. Repetition 6. Feedback 7. Variation 8. Retrieval Practice 9. Context Alignment 10. Spacing 11. Persuasion 12. Perseverance http://is.gd/DecisiveDozen
  30. Engagement & Understanding Remembering Application The Decisive Dozen for Learning Design and Learning Measurement http://is.gd/ddResearch Baseline 1. Content 2. Exposure 3. Guiding Attention 4. Creating Correct Conceptions 5. Repetition 6. Feedback 7. Variation 8. Retrieval Practice 9. Context Alignment 10. Spacing 11. Persuasion 12. Perseverance http://is.gd/DecisiveDozen Byrne, S., & Hart, P. S. (2009). The boomerang effect: A synthesis of findings and a preliminary theoretical framework. In C. S. Beck (Ed.), Communication yearbook (Vol. 220, pp. 3–37). Hoboken,NY: Routledge. Cain, L. F., & Willey, R. (1939). The effect of spaced learning on the curve of retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 25, 209-214. Chaiken, S. (1979). Communicator physical attractiveness and persuasion. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 37(8), 1387-1397. Chi, M. T. H., Bassok, M., Lewis, M. W., Reimann, P., & Glaser, R. (1989). Self-explanations: How students study and use examples in learning to solve problems. Cognitive Science, 13, 145–182. Clariana, R. B., Ross, S. M., & Morrison, G. R. (1991). The effects of different feedback strategies using computer-administered multiple-choice questions as instruction. Educational Technology Research and Development, 39, 5-17. Corkill, A. J. (1992). Advance organizers: Facilitators of recall. Educational Psychology Review, 4(1), 33-67. Crowder, R. G. (1976). Principles of learning and memory. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Dahlstrom, N., Dekker, S., van Winsen, R., & Nyce, J. (2009). Fidelity and validity of simulator training. Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, 10(4), 305-314. Davies, G. (1986). Context effects in episodic memory: A review. Cahiers de Psychologie Cognitive, 6, 157-174. de Giovanni, D., Roberts, T., & Norman, G. (2009). Relative effectiveness of high- versus low-fidelity simulation in learning heart sounds. Medical Education, 43(7), 661-668. Dempster, F. N. (1987). Effects of variable encoding and spaced presentations on vocabulary learning. Journal of Educational Psychology, 79, 162-170. Dempster, F. N. (1988). The spacing effect: A case study in the failure to apply the results of psychological research. American Psychologist, 43, 627-634. Dempster, F. N. (1989). Spacing effects and their implications for theory and practice. Educational Psychology Review, 1, 309-330. Dempster, F. N. (1996). Distributing and managing the conditions of encoding and practice. In E. L. Bjork & R. A. Bjork (Eds.) Memory (pp. 317-344). San Diego, CA: Academic Press. Dochy, F., Segers, M., & Buehl, M. M. (1999). The relation between assessment practices and outcomes of studies: The case of research on prior knowledge. Review of Educational Research, 69(2), 145-186. Donovan, J. J., & Radosevich, D. J. (1999). A meta-analytic review of the distribution of practice effect: Now you see it, now you don't. Journal of Applied Psychology, 84, 795-805. Drachman, D., deCarufel, A., &Inkso, C. A. (1978). The extra credit effect in interpersonal attraction. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 14, 458-467. Eich, E. (1995). Mood as a mediator of place dependent memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 124(3), 293-308. Eich, J. E. (1980). The cue dependent nature of state dependent retrieval. Memory and Cognition, 8, 157-173. Ericsson, K. A., & Charness, N. (1994). Expert performance: Its structure and acquisition. American Psychologist, 49, 725-774. Ericsson, K. A., Krampe, R. T., & Tesch-Römer, C. (1993). The role of deliberate practice in the acquisition of expert performance. Psychological Review, 100, 363-406. Fendrich, D. W., Healy, A. F., & Bourne, Jr., L. E. (1991). Long-term repetition effects for motoric and perceptual procedures. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 17, 137-151. Frenzen, J. K., & Davis, H. L. (1990). Purchasing behavior in embedded markets. Journal of Consumer Research, 17(1), 1-12. Gagné, R. (1965). The conditions of learning. Oxford, England: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Gardiner, J. M., Kaminska, Z., Dixon, M., & Java, R. I. (1996). Repetition of previously novel melodies sometimes increases both remember and know responses in recognition memory. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 3, 366-371. Garner, R. (2005). Post-It® Note Persuasion: A Sticky Influence. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 15, 230-237. Garner, R. L. (2005). What’s in a name? Persuasion perhaps? Journal of Consumer Psychology, 15,108-116. Garner, R., Gillingham, M. G., & White, C. S. (1989). Effects of “seductive details” on macroprocessing and microprocessing in adults and children. Cognition and Instruction, 6, 41-57. Glenberg, A. M. (1979). Component-levels theory of the effects of spacing and repetitions on recall and recognition. Memory & Cognition, 7, 95-112. Godden, D. R., and Baddeley, A. D. (1975). Context dependency in two natural environments: on land and underwater. British Journal of Psychology, 91, 99-104. Goettl, B. P., & Shute, V. J. (1996). Analysis of part-task training using the backward-transfer technique. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 2(3), 227-249. Gouldner, Alvin W. 1960. "The Norm of Reciprocity: A PreliminaryStatement." American Sociological Review 25: 161-178. Grant, H. M., Bredahl, L. C., Clay, J., Ferrie, J., Groves, J. E., McDorman, T. A., & Dark, V. J. (1998). Context-dependent memory for meaningful material: Information for students. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 12, 617-623. Hall, J. F. (1971). Verbal learning and retention. Philadelphia, Lippincott. Hamlin, J. K., Mahajan, N., Liberman, Z., & Wynn, K. (2013). Not like me = bad: Infants prefer those who harm dissimilar others. Psychological Science. Advanced Online Publication, March 4, 2013. Hammermesh, D., & Biddle, J. E. (1994). Beauty and the labor market. The American Economic Review, 84, 1174-1194. Heider, F. (1958). The psychology of interpersonal relations. Hoboken, NJ, US: John Wiley & Sons Inc Herz, R. S. (1997). The effects of cue distinctiveness on odor-based context-dependent memory. Memory & Cognition, 25(3), 375-380. Hintzman, D. L. (1974). Theoretical implications of the spacing effect. In R. L. Solso (Ed.), Theories in cognitive psychology: The Loyola Symposium (pp. 77-99). Potomac, MD: Erlbaum. Hintzman, D. L. (1976). Repetition and memory. In G. H. Bower (Ed.) The psychology of learning and motivation: Advances in theory and research (Vol. 10). New York: Academic Press. Iacobucci, C (2012). Location of Park St. Fire in Stoughton Presents Ironic Twist. Stoughton Patch, May 3, http://stoughton.patch.com. Izawa, C. (1992). Test trials contributions to optimization of learning processes: Study/test trials interactions. In A. F. Healy, S. M. Kosslyn, & R. M. Shiffrin (Eds.) From Learning Processes to Cognitive Processes: Essays in Honor of William K. Estes (Volume 2, pp. 1-33). Hillsdale, N James, W. (1890/1952). The principles of psychology. Chicago, IL: Encyclopædia Britannica. Kang, S.H.K., McDermott, K.B. & Roediger, H.L., III (2007). Test format and corrective feedback modulate the effect of testing on memory retention. The European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 19, 528-558. Karpicke, J. D., & Bauernschmidt, A. (2011). Spaced retrieval: Absolute spacing enhances learning regardless of relative spacing. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 37(5), 1250-1257. Karpicke, J. D., & Blunt, J. R. (2011). Retrieval practice produces more learning than elaborate studying with concept mapping. Science, 331(6018), 772-775. Karpicke, J. D., & Smith, M. A. (2012). Separate mnemonic effects of retrieval practice and elaborative encoding. Journal of Memory and Language. Advance online publication. Karraker, R. J. (1967). Knowledge of results and incorrect recall of plausible multiple-choice alternatives. Journal of Educational Psychology, 58, 11-14. Kausler, D. H., Wiley, J. G., & Phillips, P. L. (1990). Adult age differences in memory for massed and distributed repeated actions. Psychology and Aging, 5, 530-534. Kirschner, P. A., Sweller, J., & Clark, R. E. (2006). Why minimal guidance during instruction does not work: An analysis of the failure of constructivist, discovery, problem-based, experiential, and inquiry-based teaching. Educational Psychologist, 41(2), 75-86. Kornell, N., Castel, A. D., Eich, T. S., & Bjork, R. A. (2010). Spacing as the friend of both memory and induction in young and older adults. Psychology and Aging, 25(2), 498-503. Kornell, N., Castel, A. D., Eich, T. S., & Bjork, R. A. (2010). Spacing as the friend of both memory and induction in young and older adults. Psychology and Aging, 25(2), 498-503. Krug, D., Davis, T. B., & Glover, J. A. (1990). Massed versus distributed repeated reading: A case of forgetting helping recall? Journal of Educational Psychology, 82, 366-371. Kuklinski , J. K. Quirk , P. J. Jerit , J. Schwieder , D. Rich , R. F. (2000). Misinformation and the currency of democratic citizenship. The Journal of Politics 62: 790-816. Kulhavy, R. W. (1977). Feedback in written instruction. Review of Educational Research, 47, 211-232. Kulhavy, R. W., & Anderson, R. C. (1972). Delay-retention effect with multiple-choice tests. Journal of Educational Psychology, 63, 505-512. Kulhavy, R. W., Yekovich, F. R., & Dyer, J. W. (1976). Feedback and response confidence. Journal of Educational Psychology, 68, 522-528. Langlois, J. H., Kalakanis, L., Rubenstein, A. J., Larson, A., Hallam, M., & Smoot, M. (2000). Maxims or myths of beauty? A meta-analytic and theoretical review. Psychological Bulletin, 126(3), 390-423. Lee, T. D., & Genovese, E. D. (1988). Distribution of practice in motor skill acquisition: Different effects for discrete and continuous tasks. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 60, 59-65. Lewandowsky S., Ecker U.K.H., Seifert C.M., Schwarz N., & Cook J. (2012). Misinformation and Its Correction: Continued Influence and Successful Debiasing. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 13, 106-131. Lim, J., Reiser, R. A., & Olina, Z. (2009). The effects of part-task and whole-task instructional approaches on acquisition and transfer of a complex cognitive skill. Educational Technology Research and Development, 57(1), 61-77. Mattoon, J. S. (1994). Designing instructional simulations: Effects of instructional control and type of training task on developing display-interpretation skills. International Journal of Aviation Psychology, 4(3), 189-209. Mayer, R. E. (1979). Twenty years of research on advance organizers: Assimilation theory is still the best predictor of results. Instructional Science, 8(2), 133-167.
  31. http://is.gd/TrainingResearch2012
  32. Photo by Juliana Coutinho - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/10217810@N05 Created with Haiku Deck What can you do to help your speakers improve their presentations with science of learning that ultimately improves your participants’ learning?
  33. # 3
  34. Photo by Juliana Coutinho - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/10217810@N05 Created with Haiku Deck How would you describe gamification?
  35. Gamification is NOT • badges, points, rewards • trivialization of learning • perfect for every situation • easy to create • just game mechanics
  36. Gamification is using game-based mechanics, aesthetics and game thinking to engage people, motivate action, promote learning and solve problems. Dr. Karl Kapp
  37. Learning can benefit from social interaction.
  38. Photo by Juliana Coutinho - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/10217810@N05 Created with Haiku Deck How can you add more intimate learning moments through human elements?
  39. # 4 Learner Feedback & Measurement
  40. If we knew nothing about whether our learners benefitted from our learning sessions, what harm would befall our conferences?
  41. Photo by Juliana Coutinho - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/10217810@N05 Created with Haiku Deck How do we know if your conference education is effective and leads to attendee learning?
  42. Learner Responses to Performance Results r=.16 Alliger, Tannenbaum, Bennett, Traver, & Shotland (1997). A meta-analysis of the relations among training criteria. Personnel Psychology, 50, 341-357. Very Weak Relationship between Learner Responses & Learning Correlation? Learner Responses to Learning Results r=.09
  43. Sitzmann, T., Brown, K. G., Casper, W. J., Ely, K., & Zimmerman, R. D. (2008). A review and meta-analysis of the nomological network of trainee reactions. Journal of Applied Psychology, 93, 280-295. Correlation? No Practical Significance Weak Relationship is below .30 and .09 is VERY WEAK So…SMILE SHEETS tell us VERY LITTLE about Learning Learner Responses to Learning Results r=.09
  44. Likert-like Scales provide Poor Data A. Strongly Agree B. Agree C. Neither Agree Nor Disagree D. Disagree E. Strongly Disagree 5 4 3 2 1 4.1 Compared to: • Previous • Standard • Others Sharon Shrock and Bill Coscarelli, authors of the classic text, now in its third edition, Criterion-Referenced Test Development, offer the following wisdom: On using Likert-type Descriptive Scales (of the kind that uses response words such as “Agree,” “Strongly Agree,” etc.): “…the resulting scale is deficient in that the [response words] are open to many interpretations.” (p. 188)
  45. Improved Response Forms
  46. # 5 Performance Focus
  47. Photo by Juliana Coutinho - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/10217810@N05 Created with Haiku Deck How do we know if your conference education is effective and leads to attendee learning?
  48. When conferences offer education session that do not translate into increased performance and productivity, it is learning scrap!
  49. Too much of our conference education is wasted efforts, time and information because it is never applied on the job!
  50. Less than 25% of adult education offerings measurably improve job performance. McKinsey& Company Report March 2013
  51. Mounting evidence that adult education offerings make little or no difference in job behavior. J. Mosel, 1957
  52. More than 50 years later and we still haven’t improved conference education so that participants improve their job performance!
  53. Is Content Valid? Are Learners Engaged? Do Learners Understand? Do Learners Get Realistic Practice? Do Learners Get Job Aids? Do Learners Do Triggered Action Planning? Are Learners Motivated? Are Learners Monitored? Are Learners Prompted to Action? Do Learners get Spaced Repetitions? During the Session After the Session Conference-Education Learning Model
  54. Photo by Juliana Coutinho - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/10217810@N05 Created with Haiku Deck How do we know if your conference education is effective and leads to attendee learning?
  55. INVITATION Jeff & Will cordially invite you to: Subscription-Learning 2-month pilot… www.is.gd/pcma_jeff_will
  56. Phone: 888-579-9814 Email: info@work-learning.com Website: Work-Learning.com Blog: willatworklearning.com Twitter: @WillWorkLearn Will Thalheimer, PhD Work-Learning Research, Inc. Phone: 214-941-4330 Email: jhurt@velvetchainsaw.com Website: VelvetChainsaw.com Blog: velvetchainsaw.com Twitter: @JeffHurt Jeff Hurt Velvet Chainsaw

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