Why? Extreme
(20 years experience)
Why?
Why Choose Switching Technology?
Y exceeds your need
Z exceeds your need
X exceeds your need
Z
Latency
Y TCAM
X
ports
fn(x...
Great Networks are Built like
“a great candy bar”.
Caution: Extreme Metaphor
Speed with Features
Metro QoS “like ATM”
Flexible “stacking”
Thin CrunchyFit
Speed
Opex
A
a
D
D
XoS Platform with Broad...
Apps
Thick & Chewy
Aa
user
exp.
 Simplicity w Policy (Netsite,
NAC & Purview)
 Wired and Wireless
 100% insourced suppo...
!
Bus
D
D
user
exp.
Fit
Speed
Policy
Control
Today you get both!
Plus a new Approach
Yesterday - Cabletron Changed the
gam...
Shouldn’t call it just a switch!
What does a switch do?
Isolates traffic (collisions)
Extending segments(Reach)
Diagnos...
Thinking inside
the box
Before (Line-rate w features turned on)
Now (Lossless data transmission)
Fast Path
TCAM
CPU & Memo...
Network OS To Bare Metal
1997-2004
Pioneering
L3 Switching
2004-2010
merchant
silicon
2011-2015
Automation
Extreme Ware Xo...
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3 Great Networks & Switches Whiteboard 2016

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Negotiating: It's two pit bulls locked in a room and one is going to be forced to roll over. Ick. That mentality is not only outdated, but will get you nowhere. That's because, frankly, baring teeth and barking the loudest doesn't have the power it might seem to when bargaining. When deal making gets tense, no one ever wants to back down. The savviest negotiators take nothing personally; they are impervious to criticism and impossible to fluster. And because they seem unmoved by the whole situation and unimpressed with the stakes involved, they have a way of unnerving less-experienced counterparts. This can be an effective weapon when used against entrepreneurs, because entrepreneurs tend to take every aspect of their businesses very personally. Entrepreneurs often style themselves as frank, no-nonsense individuals, and they can at times have thin skin. But whenever you negotiate, remember that it pays to stay calm, to never show that an absurdly low counter-offer or an annoying stalling tactic has upset you. Use your equanimity to unnerve the person who is negotiating with you. And if he or she becomes angry or peeved, don't take the bait to strike back. Just take heart: You've grabbed the emotional advantage in the situation. Now go close that deal.

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3 Great Networks & Switches Whiteboard 2016

  1. 1. Why? Extreme (20 years experience) Why?
  2. 2. Why Choose Switching Technology? Y exceeds your need Z exceeds your need X exceeds your need Z Latency Y TCAM X ports fn(x,y,z) What If? Then? Simple Repeatable (Fit with Platform Design Equity) Control (Broad based Policy, Analytics & Security) User Experience (Fast, Invisible & Mobile) Good Fast Cheep
  3. 3. Great Networks are Built like “a great candy bar”. Caution: Extreme Metaphor
  4. 4. Speed with Features Metro QoS “like ATM” Flexible “stacking” Thin CrunchyFit Speed Opex A a D D XoS Platform with Broadcom
  5. 5. Apps Thick & Chewy Aa user exp.  Simplicity w Policy (Netsite, NAC & Purview)  Wired and Wireless  100% insourced support Who, what, when, Where not Phys. D D Flow Based Switching / One Fabric Policy Control
  6. 6. ! Bus D D user exp. Fit Speed Policy Control Today you get both! Plus a new Approach Yesterday - Cabletron Changed the game w Structured wiring (remember Vampire taps, Coax Ethernet ect.) Today - Structured networking Keeping the lights on! Opex A a
  7. 7. Shouldn’t call it just a switch! What does a switch do? Isolates traffic (collisions) Extending segments(Reach) Diagnostics (Structure) Caution: Extreme Metaphor
  8. 8. Thinking inside the box Before (Line-rate w features turned on) Now (Lossless data transmission) Fast Path TCAM CPU & Memory Slow Path Fast path Slow path
  9. 9. Network OS To Bare Metal 1997-2004 Pioneering L3 Switching 2004-2010 merchant silicon 2011-2015 Automation Extreme Ware XoS Enterprise Metro Utility/ White Box Data Center Revenues Bandwidth Demand for Packet-Based Services Competitive Pressures Time Quantity OpEx CapEx

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