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Business email
best practices
the Good, the Bad, & the Ugly
Jeff Doubek
Content Consultant
Doubek Worldwide Media, Inc.
110 msgs
The average person
receives per day.
*The Radicati Group - 2010 “Email Statistics Report”
Quick story...
In the days I ran a non-profit, I remember my
non-profit community reacting angrily to an email, causing
a ...
“Email is a good and
bad thing.”
So be responsible.
<Habit 1>
Be clear and concise
Examples:
Specific subject lines
“Inverted pyramid” body
Call to action
Subject examples:
Original
“Social Media Mastery”
Better
“Please read: Tips for social media mastery”
Best
“Useful tips fo...
Message body
Cut to the chase
The inverted pyramid:
Put the important
information
at the
top
State your purpose!
“I am requesting feedback today
on the attached doc in order to
meet tomorrow’s deadline.”
Support that statement
“This is the XYZ product
presentation, based on comments
from yesterday’s meeting.”
Two more tips...
Give me a bullet...
• please!
Close with call to action:
“Please respond and provide specific
feedback – ...
NRN
No reply necessary.
Don’t thank me
Request acknowledgement of receipt
Do you need to be thanked?
Never copy all on a thank you
When responding...
Answer all questions
Pre-empt further questions
More great tips...
cc with care
Reply all rarely
Avoid email “ping-pong”
<Habit 2>
Limit email time
Schedule inbox checks:
(e.g. 8:30, 1:30, 4:30)
Make few exceptions
Do yourself a favor...
Turn off the alerts!
<Habit 3>
Process your inbox
• 3-Rs: read, respond, remove
• 2-minute rule: if you can respond
in 2 minutes, then do it!
• (the key ...
Create follow-up tasks
In Outlook:
Use inbox folders
They are decision
enablers, make
labels such as:
“Save for reference”
“To read (later)”
Project titles
Make flag rules
The flag routine
Blue = unprocessed
Red = needs follow-up
Check = done
“Right click” to change
Remember though...
“Don’t let the process
replace the action.”
Also...
*** The 24-hour Rule ***
Wait a day before replying to
messages that anger you.
Avoid emotional responses.
Final Story...
I once worked for an employer who made a point of
dressing down his charges via email, and did it
while bcc...
Be Responsible.
Takeaways
1. Be clear and be concise
2. Check 3 times only
3. Process your inbox
Thank you!
More tips at:
www.doubekworldwide.com
Email Best Practices - the Good, the Bad, & the Ugly
Email Best Practices - the Good, the Bad, & the Ugly
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Email Best Practices - the Good, the Bad, & the Ugly

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A set of tips for responsible email practices for corporate and business environments. Includes ways to reduce email and ways to increase your productivity.
By Jeff Doubek, Content Consultant and Copywriter at Doubek Worldwide Media, Inc.

Published in: Business
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Email Best Practices - the Good, the Bad, & the Ugly

  1. 1. Business email best practices the Good, the Bad, & the Ugly Jeff Doubek Content Consultant Doubek Worldwide Media, Inc.
  2. 2. 110 msgs The average person receives per day. *The Radicati Group - 2010 “Email Statistics Report”
  3. 3. Quick story... In the days I ran a non-profit, I remember my non-profit community reacting angrily to an email, causing a day’s worth of email volleys. Back and forth. In the end, it was discovered the whole deal was taken out of context, something a quick phone call could have easily prevented. The moral here...
  4. 4. “Email is a good and bad thing.” So be responsible.
  5. 5. <Habit 1>
  6. 6. Be clear and concise
  7. 7. Examples: Specific subject lines “Inverted pyramid” body Call to action
  8. 8. Subject examples: Original “Social Media Mastery” Better “Please read: Tips for social media mastery” Best “Useful tips for increasing our social media ROI”
  9. 9. Message body Cut to the chase
  10. 10. The inverted pyramid: Put the important information at the top
  11. 11. State your purpose! “I am requesting feedback today on the attached doc in order to meet tomorrow’s deadline.”
  12. 12. Support that statement “This is the XYZ product presentation, based on comments from yesterday’s meeting.”
  13. 13. Two more tips... Give me a bullet... • please! Close with call to action: “Please respond and provide specific feedback – thank you.”
  14. 14. NRN No reply necessary.
  15. 15. Don’t thank me Request acknowledgement of receipt Do you need to be thanked? Never copy all on a thank you
  16. 16. When responding... Answer all questions Pre-empt further questions
  17. 17. More great tips... cc with care Reply all rarely Avoid email “ping-pong”
  18. 18. <Habit 2>
  19. 19. Limit email time Schedule inbox checks: (e.g. 8:30, 1:30, 4:30) Make few exceptions
  20. 20. Do yourself a favor...
  21. 21. Turn off the alerts!
  22. 22. <Habit 3>
  23. 23. Process your inbox • 3-Rs: read, respond, remove • 2-minute rule: if you can respond in 2 minutes, then do it! • (the key is to make decisions)
  24. 24. Create follow-up tasks
  25. 25. In Outlook:
  26. 26. Use inbox folders
  27. 27. They are decision enablers, make labels such as: “Save for reference” “To read (later)” Project titles
  28. 28. Make flag rules
  29. 29. The flag routine Blue = unprocessed Red = needs follow-up Check = done “Right click” to change
  30. 30. Remember though...
  31. 31. “Don’t let the process replace the action.”
  32. 32. Also... *** The 24-hour Rule *** Wait a day before replying to messages that anger you. Avoid emotional responses.
  33. 33. Final Story... I once worked for an employer who made a point of dressing down his charges via email, and did it while bcc-ing half the company. It created a horrible culture of mistrust. You never knew if your next note from him was Being broadcast to the entire company. The moral here...
  34. 34. Be Responsible.
  35. 35. Takeaways 1. Be clear and be concise 2. Check 3 times only 3. Process your inbox
  36. 36. Thank you! More tips at: www.doubekworldwide.com

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