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Neuromuscular Adaptations to Human Computer Interfaces

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Neuromuscular Adaptations to Human Computer Interfaces

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Goals:
- Understand neuromuscular adaptations in a variety of applications
- Understand Human Computer Interfaces in a variety of applications
- Research current issues affecting construction workers
- Design a pilot in the loop controller for the Parrot AR Drone
- Design a pilot in the loop controller for the Asctec Hummingbird

Goals:
- Understand neuromuscular adaptations in a variety of applications
- Understand Human Computer Interfaces in a variety of applications
- Research current issues affecting construction workers
- Design a pilot in the loop controller for the Parrot AR Drone
- Design a pilot in the loop controller for the Asctec Hummingbird

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Neuromuscular Adaptations to Human Computer Interfaces

  1. 1. Jay Mulakala May 5th, 2015 Bretl Research Group Neuromuscular Adaptations to Human Computer Interfaces
  2. 2. 2 1. Understand neuromuscular adaptations in a variety of applications 2. Understand Human Computer Interfaces in a variety of applications 3. Research current issues affecting construction workers 4. Design a pilot in the loop controller for the Parrot AR Drone 5. Design a pilot in the loop controller for the Asctec Hummingbird Research Goals
  3. 3. 3 Neuromuscular Adaptations Overview Neuromuscular Adaptations • Adaptive Robot Co-Workers • Exercise, Training, and Rehabilitation • Robotic Vehicles • Autonomous • Manual • Drivers “Current human-robot interactions require physical contact between the operator and machine, creating a coupled dynamic system” “Neuromuscular adaptations in human-robot interactions allow for increased control and stability through an HCI”
  4. 4. 4 Human Computer Interaction Overview Principles behind HCI • Early focus on users and tasks • Determine appropriate users • Empirical Measurement • Quantify results • Iterative Design • Design • Test • Analyze • Repeat “Human Computer Interaction is the fusion of computer technology, with a focus on interfaces between people and computers” “Human Computer Interaction is situated at the intersection of computer science, behavioral sciences, design, and media study”
  5. 5. 5 Myo Armband Overview Using proprietary EMG sensors, the Myo measures electrical activity from muscles to detect poses made by your hands. Using a 9-axis IMU, it senses the motion, orientation and rotation of your forearm.
  6. 6. 6 Muscle (EMG) Activity - Electromyography Electromyography • Medicine technique • Evaluates and records electrical activity from skeletal muscles • Used to detect: • Medical abnormalities • Activation levels • Recruitment orders Myo • Uses electromyography as an input • Uses FCU and ECU muscles as a controller
  7. 7. 7 OV1 Diagram GUI sends and receives data from quadcopter
  8. 8. 8
  9. 9. Jay Mulakala mmulak2@illinois.edu Neuromuscular Adaptations to Human Computer Interfaces Questions?
  10. 10. 10 References • http://www.pilarmartinescudero.es/dic13/Performance_and_Neuromusc ular_Adaptations.15.pdf • http://www.slideshare.net/danesmith_1/neuromuscular-adaptations-to- training • http://www.cognitiveengineering.gatech.edu/presentations/nri-pi-2014- understanding-neuromuscular-adaptations-human-robot-physical- interaction • http://www.cognitiveengineering.gatech.edu/projects/nsf-nri-small- understanding-neuromuscular-adaptations-human-robot-physical- interaction • http://arxiv.org/pdf/1301.0043.pdf • http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~illah/PAPERS/ahs.pdf
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Editor's Notes

  • Good afternoon, My name is Jay Mulakala. A senior working with David Hanley. Today I will be presenting my research on Neuromuscular adaptations to Human computer interfaces, particularly with quad copters.
  • This research was motivated by my interest in human computer interfaces and applications of HCI using quadcopters. To conduct my research, I set out to understand …
  • Through my research, I discovered various applications of neuromuscular technologies, from adaptive robot co-workers to exercise, robot vehicles, and even drivers. This area emphasizes the importance of increased control and stability in human-robot interactions.
  • I then dove into the principles behind human computer interfaces. The primary principles behind these interfaces include early focus on users and tasks, numerical or empirical measurement of results throughout the process, and overall iterative design. One recent technology that provides a seamless experience and neuromuscular feedback is the myo.
  • The myo armband uses propriety emg sensors to measure electrical activity from muscles to detect poses made by your hand. It even includes 9-axis IMU to determine motion, orientation, and rotation.
  • It uses a technique called electromyography, a medicine technique that evaluates and records electrical activity from skeletal muscles. The myo uses this feedback as inputs for the controller.
  • My research was focused on using this technology to control the asctec hummingbird, allowing operators to much more intuitively control a quadcopter. In this project, I programmed the myo to communicate with the quadcopter through a desktop based GUI. Unfortunately, due to time constraints, I wasn’t able to control the asctec hummingbird, but was able to control the Parrot AR drone. Here is a quick demo.
  • Using the myo armband, I was successfully able to control the quadcopter using hand gestures. I had control over the yaw and pitch of the quad, while the roll and altitude were kept constant. Waving my hand left or right caused the quadcopter to yaw left or right. A closed fist caused the quadcopter to pitch backward, and an open fist caused the quadcopter to pitch forward. Using this research, construction works would be able to priciseley navigate through tight spaces and areas where autonomous control just won’t be enough. Future research will use the IMU’s the control the quadcopter by simply moving your arm, instead of gestures.
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