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Broken window theory

The Broken Window Theory has been around since 1982 - its basis can be introduced into the Business Environment...lets us show you how to create the right Culture for your organisation and business.

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Broken window theory

  1. 1. BROKEN WINDOW THEORY …BROKEN BUSINESS? CREATING THE ‘NORM’ JAY ACHARYA
  2. 2. THEORY • Theory introduced in the 1980’s by James Q. Wilson and George L. Kelling ‘Consider a building with a few broken windows. If the windows are not repaired, the tendency is for vandals to break a few more windows. Eventually, they may even break into the building, and if it's unoccupied, perhaps become squa@ers or light fires inside.’ The Broken Windows Theory is directed at the norm-­‐se(ng of urban disorder, crime and anJ social behaviour breeding the same etc. where; if an urban area is leM in a state of dis-­‐repair, broken windows, rubbish on the streets and overgrown gardens, people will follow suit and adopt the same aPtude to their environment. They are living the NORM.
  3. 3. LET US ADAPT THE QUOTE… ‘Consider a business with a few under performing people. If the people are not supported and not understanding the strategy, the tendency is for others to start to under perform also. Eventually, this will impact your service and business performance, and if it's neglected, perhaps clients become uncommi@ed to you.’
  4. 4. LET US CREATE THE NORM By speaking to us, here at ASPIRE, we can idenJfy what THE NORM should look like to you and your people. So instead of creaJng a culture of BROKEN WINDOWS, we can create a culture of wanJng to be high performers and strategy led individuals. If you would like to know more about this, and see what support we can offer, please contact us at your earliest opportunity. 0333 772 0369 | info@aspire.me.uk www.aspire.me.uk

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