Allusion:
A reference to something or
someone often literary. For
instance, if you were trying to
instill confidence in a ...
Antagonist:
A major character who opposes
the protagonist in a story or
play.
Characterization:
The means by which an author
establishes character. An
author may directly describe
the appearance and p...
Climax:
The point at which the action in
a story or play reaches its
emotional peak.
Conflict:
The elements that create a plot.
Traditionally, every plot is built
from the most basic elements of a
conflict a...
First Person Point of View:
The point of view of writing
which the narrator refers to
himself as “I.”
Figurative Language:
A type of language that
varies from the norms of
literal language, in which
words do not mean exactly...
Foreshadowing:
A technique in which an author
gives clues about something that
will happen later in the story.
Genre:
A kind of style usually art or
literature. Some literary genres
are mysteries, westerns, and
romances.
Imagery:
The use of description that helps
the reader imagine how something
looks, sounds, feels, smells, or taste.
Most o...
Irony:
Language that conveys a certain
idea by saying just the opposite.
Mood:
The emotional atmosphere of a
given piece of writing.
Narrator:
The person telling the story
who may or may not be a
character in the story.
Symbolism:
The use of one thing to
represent another. For
example, a dove is a symbol of
peace.
Theme:
The central idea of a work.
Third Person (Objective) Point
of View - Narrator is not
identified (a detached observer).
Does not assume character's
per...
Tone:
The author’s attitude toward
his or her subject. For
example, a tone could be
pessimistic, optimistic, or angry.
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Literary Terms Review

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Literary Terms Review

  1. 1. Allusion: A reference to something or someone often literary. For instance, if you were trying to instill confidence in a friend and said, “Use the force,” that would be an allusion to Stars Wars. The verb form of allusion is to allude.
  2. 2. Antagonist: A major character who opposes the protagonist in a story or play.
  3. 3. Characterization: The means by which an author establishes character. An author may directly describe the appearance and personality of character or show it through action or dialogue.
  4. 4. Climax: The point at which the action in a story or play reaches its emotional peak.
  5. 5. Conflict: The elements that create a plot. Traditionally, every plot is built from the most basic elements of a conflict and an eventual resolution. The conflict can be internal (within one character) or external (among or between characters, society, and/or nature).
  6. 6. First Person Point of View: The point of view of writing which the narrator refers to himself as “I.”
  7. 7. Figurative Language: A type of language that varies from the norms of literal language, in which words do not mean exactly what they say.
  8. 8. Foreshadowing: A technique in which an author gives clues about something that will happen later in the story.
  9. 9. Genre: A kind of style usually art or literature. Some literary genres are mysteries, westerns, and romances.
  10. 10. Imagery: The use of description that helps the reader imagine how something looks, sounds, feels, smells, or taste. Most of the time, it refers to appearance. For example, “The young bird’s white, feathered wings flutter as he made his way across the nighttime sky.”
  11. 11. Irony: Language that conveys a certain idea by saying just the opposite.
  12. 12. Mood: The emotional atmosphere of a given piece of writing.
  13. 13. Narrator: The person telling the story who may or may not be a character in the story.
  14. 14. Symbolism: The use of one thing to represent another. For example, a dove is a symbol of peace.
  15. 15. Theme: The central idea of a work.
  16. 16. Third Person (Objective) Point of View - Narrator is not identified (a detached observer). Does not assume character's perspective and is not a character in the story. The narrator reports on events and lets the reader supply the meaning.
  17. 17. Tone: The author’s attitude toward his or her subject. For example, a tone could be pessimistic, optimistic, or angry.

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