UNIT 12 Message Factors
STRUCTURE
Argument Ordering 1. Climatic: Finish with strongest point 2. Anti-climatic: begin with strongest point No significant dif...
Stated vs. Implied Conclusions Messages with stated conclusions are more effective than messages with implied conclusions
Message Comprehensibility McGuire Model (review):  A message must be comprehended to be persuasive
CONTENT
Opposing Arguments   1. One-sided Message:  If the audience is not familiar with the issue 2. Two-sided Message: This is u...
Evidence Effectiveness
A. Credibility of source of evidence <ul><li>Evidence is likely to be more credible if delivered by a credible source. </l...
B. Evidence Amount <ul><li>1. There is no set amount needed </li></ul>2. It is good to have more than enough
C. Evidence Novelty <ul><li>1. Most recent evidence available is likely to be the most effective. </li></ul>2. Evidence ev...
D. Evidence’s Consistence with other Known Evidence <ul><li>Evidence must “fit in” with what the audience knows. </li></ul...
E. Evidence and the ELM: Amount of Evidence Perloff
1. High-Involvement Conditions b. Audience processes centrally and therefore taking care to consider the evidence’s qualit...
1. Low-Involvement Conditions a. Quantity not Quality b. Audience members are more likely to listen to peripheral cues, wh...
Message Vividness
•  Vivid information is more likely to hold our attention •  It is more emotionally interesting •  It is NOT necessarily m...
Case Histories A. Bell & Loftus, 1985 <ul><li>Vivid Information (Nisbett & Ross) “ (a) emotionally </li></ul><ul><li>inter...
<ul><li>Vivid Information may receive more weight in judgments than pallid information for three major reasons. </li></ul>...
b. Attentional and Memorial: People will pay more attention and will remember more information that is vivid. c. Affective...
Speed  of  Delivery
Powerful vs.  Powerless Language
A. Powerful Speech <ul><li>Fluent, concise speech, which flows well and has few verbal qualifiers (uhs and umms) and littl...
B. Powerless Speech <ul><li>Lots of Verbal Qualifiers, Hesitations, Tag Questions (don’t you think?), disclaimers (of cour...
C. Implications for Persuasion <ul><li>Powerless speaking is perceived as less credible and less competent than the use of...
Language Intensity <ul><li>“  Dramatic language which may includes obscenity, political metaphors, graphic language, and h...
Good when . . . <ul><li>The audience is in agreement with your message (preaching to the choir) </li></ul>Not good when . ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Unit 12

468 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
468
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Unit 12

  1. 1. UNIT 12 Message Factors
  2. 2. STRUCTURE
  3. 3. Argument Ordering 1. Climatic: Finish with strongest point 2. Anti-climatic: begin with strongest point No significant differences in the structure or arguments
  4. 4. Stated vs. Implied Conclusions Messages with stated conclusions are more effective than messages with implied conclusions
  5. 5. Message Comprehensibility McGuire Model (review): A message must be comprehended to be persuasive
  6. 6. CONTENT
  7. 7. Opposing Arguments 1. One-sided Message: If the audience is not familiar with the issue 2. Two-sided Message: This is usually more effective – even with an audience’s prior knowledge
  8. 8. Evidence Effectiveness
  9. 9. A. Credibility of source of evidence <ul><li>Evidence is likely to be more credible if delivered by a credible source. </li></ul>
  10. 10. B. Evidence Amount <ul><li>1. There is no set amount needed </li></ul>2. It is good to have more than enough
  11. 11. C. Evidence Novelty <ul><li>1. Most recent evidence available is likely to be the most effective. </li></ul>2. Evidence everyone knows is NOT likely to have a very great impact
  12. 12. D. Evidence’s Consistence with other Known Evidence <ul><li>Evidence must “fit in” with what the audience knows. </li></ul>The Case of Modern Genetic Research
  13. 13. E. Evidence and the ELM: Amount of Evidence Perloff
  14. 14. 1. High-Involvement Conditions b. Audience processes centrally and therefore taking care to consider the evidence’s quality <ul><li>a. Quality not Quantity </li></ul>
  15. 15. 1. Low-Involvement Conditions a. Quantity not Quality b. Audience members are more likely to listen to peripheral cues, which may include the amount of evidence
  16. 16. Message Vividness
  17. 17. • Vivid information is more likely to hold our attention • It is more emotionally interesting • It is NOT necessarily more Effective than non-vivid material EXCEPT
  18. 18. Case Histories A. Bell & Loftus, 1985 <ul><li>Vivid Information (Nisbett & Ross) “ (a) emotionally </li></ul><ul><li>interesting, (b) concrete and imagery-provoking, and </li></ul><ul><li>(c) proximate in a sensory, temporal, or spatial way.” </li></ul>
  19. 19. <ul><li>Vivid Information may receive more weight in judgments than pallid information for three major reasons. </li></ul><ul><li>Inferential: Vividness of testimony Affects judgments because of the influence of vividness on inferences about the credibility of communicators. </li></ul>
  20. 20. b. Attentional and Memorial: People will pay more attention and will remember more information that is vivid. c. Affective: Vivid information raises emotional responses at the affective level. -- Defense lawyers can get higher verdicts
  21. 21. Speed of Delivery
  22. 22. Powerful vs. Powerless Language
  23. 23. A. Powerful Speech <ul><li>Fluent, concise speech, which flows well and has few verbal qualifiers (uhs and umms) and little awkward hesitation </li></ul>
  24. 24. B. Powerless Speech <ul><li>Lots of Verbal Qualifiers, Hesitations, Tag Questions (don’t you think?), disclaimers (of course I could be wrong), intensifiers (really, amazingly, etc), and polite forms (if you wouldn’t mind) </li></ul>
  25. 25. C. Implications for Persuasion <ul><li>Powerless speaking is perceived as less credible and less competent than the use of a powerful style </li></ul>
  26. 26. Language Intensity <ul><li>“ Dramatic language which may includes obscenity, political metaphors, graphic language, and highly opinionated statements” </li></ul>
  27. 27. Good when . . . <ul><li>The audience is in agreement with your message (preaching to the choir) </li></ul>Not good when . . . <ul><li>The audience does not initially agree with you – this will cause you to alienate your audience </li></ul>

×