Decisive Overtime-Resolution For Football's Overtime Dilemma

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Decisive Overtime is the most efficient, fair, exciting way to determine a winner of a football game in the event of a tie at the end of regulation.

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Decisive Overtime-Resolution For Football's Overtime Dilemma

  1. 1. DECISIVE OVERTIMETM“DICTATE INEVITABILITY”<br />RESOLUTION FOR FOOTBALL’S OVERTIME DILEMMA<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />1<br />
  2. 2. All college games, NFL post-season games and most NFL “Sudden Death” overtime (regular season) games are resolved with a winner.<br />That’s not the issue, though. The NCAA and NFL are relying on probability, rather than dictating inevitability by implementing the most efficient system to guarantee winners.<br />“Decisive Overtime” offers a solution that combines fairness, excitement and player safety.<br />“Decisive Overtime” eliminates as many unnecessary variables as possible, while increasing the spirit of the game/competition.<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />2<br />DICTATE INEVITABILITYDON’T DEFER TO PROBABILITY<br />
  3. 3. A winner is guaranteed because teams must play to win and can not play to tie.<br />Both teams get possessions.<br />Players’ exposure to potential injury is minimized because a winner will be determined in a maximum of 9 plays (barring penalties). 4 plays for each offensive team and possibly 1 more in the event of an additional “1-play Decisive Overtime” period.<br />Decisive Overtime delivers the intensity of a HaglervsHearns “slugfest”.<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />3<br />“DECISIVE OVERTIME” SOLUTION<br />
  4. 4. Decisive Overtime accomplishes several key objectives:<br />Determines a winner in the quickest, fairest manner possible.<br />Prevents “unnecessary” additional game time.<br />Increases drama, excitement, intensity and strategy.<br />Minimizes risk of injury to players.<br />OVERTIME SYSTEMMUST RESOLVE, NOT PROLONG OR EXTEND GAME<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />4<br />
  5. 5. Ties are unacceptable and have no place in sports.<br />Aside from entertainment and revenue generation, the only reason to play games is to determine a winner. <br />Hockey and soccer might allow/endorse ties. But even baseball and basketball determine a winner in every contest.<br />Ties are rare in NFL football, but they have occurred.<br />Employing a system that allows ties to occur is flawed and inefficient.<br />Plus, there is an entirely untapped “goldmine” of excitement not being integrated into overtime games.<br />TEAMS MUST PLAY TO WIN<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />5<br />
  6. 6. The coin flip to start games simply determines sequence of preference (1st or 2nd half choice).<br />Numerous possessions take place during both halves, so getting the ball to start a half doesn’t prohibit the other team from offensive possessions.<br />The coin flip in overtime provides a competitive advantage to the winner because of the potential for limited (or only 1) offensive possessions.<br />COIN FLIP MUST NOT PROVIDE COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE IN OVERTIME<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />6<br />
  7. 7. Coin flip in NFL overtime can result in only 1 team having offensive possession.<br />Statistics indicate teams winning coin flip have 60-40 advantage (1995-2009).<br />Overtime coin flip does not involve strategy.<br />Winning team, almost exclusively, chooses to receive.<br />Rare cases of gale force winds or inclement weather sometimes result in winning team kicking off.<br />But those are exceptions.<br />NFL RULES-COIN FLIP<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />7<br />
  8. 8. Coin flip in college involves no strategy and results in winning team choosing defense 1st.<br />College overtime rules provide possessions for both teams, but the winner of the coin flip has a distinct competitive advantage.<br />The team with the 2nd offensive possession (choosing defense 1st) knows whether a field goal or touchdown will win (OR TIE) and can adjust strategy accordingly.<br />The team with the 1st offensive possession does not have this benefit.<br />College system makes the coin flip winner “The House” and the coin flip loser “The Gambler”.<br />In “Casino Gaming”, the gambler can win, but the odds are significantly in the house’s favor.<br />COLLEGE RULES-COIN FLIP<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />8<br />
  9. 9. Player safety is a major focus of all rules in the NFL. Protecting the NFL’s valuable commodities (players) is crucial. There is a reason why the following are no longer legal:<br />Headslap<br />Horse Collar <br />Spearing<br />Helmet to helmet contact<br />Hitting defenseless players<br />Blows to the QB’s head<br />PLAYER SAFETY: PRIORITY #1<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />9<br />
  10. 10. If player safety is top priority in the NFL, why does the current overtime system create an environment of unnecessary risk? <br />Football is dangerous enough already. It doesn’t make sense for players to have to potentially play an additional 25% of a regulation game (15 minutes) in a regular season overtime game in order to determine a winner.<br />It’s still possible to play an entire overtime period and not determine a winner.<br />It’s not safe for college players to be subjected to multiple overtimes. The 7OT game in 2001 between Arkansas and Ole Miss, while interesting, was dangerous for players and not an efficient means to resolve the game.<br />MINIMIZE ENVIRONMENT OF RISK<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />10<br />
  11. 11. “Sudden Death” is a compelling name, but the overtime action is rarely reflective of the moniker.<br />“Sudden Death” is designed to create an Ali vs Frazier “slugfest”, but often results in a Holyfield vs Ruiz “hugfest” or a Holyfield vs Douglas “1-punchfest”.<br />Support for, and objections to, “Sudden Death” overtime have validity. However, no arguments address the primary limiting factor.<br />In regular season NFL games, it is possible to play for 75 minutes and still not determine a winner. <br />NFL “SUDDEN DEATH” OVERTIME SYSTEM NEEDS IMPROVEMENT<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />11<br />
  12. 12. A winner is not guaranteed (in regular season games).<br />Teams are not forced to play to win.<br />Play can last up to 15 minutes longer than regulation (in regular season games).<br />Both teams are not guaranteed possessions.<br />Conservative play often results in numerous “3 & outs”.<br />Teams play not to lose as time and possessions transpire.<br />Games can, theoretically, go on indefinitely (in post-season) if neither team scores during successive 15-minute overtime periods.<br />NFL OVERTIME RULE PROBLEMS/FLAWS<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />12<br />
  13. 13. College football has utilized a more fair system for overtime, with offensive possessions for both teams.<br />But college overtime rules allow for the potential of numerous, theoretically limitless, overtime periods.<br />Sometimes college overtime games are decided in 1 period, but quick resolution is not guaranteed.<br />College overtime is designed to create a “Michael Jordan vs Dominique Wilkins” dunk contest, but often delivers a “Shaq vs Dwight Howard” free-throw contest of misses and “Mulligans”.<br />CURRENT COLLEGE OVERTIMESYSTEM NEEDS IMPROVEMENT<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />13<br />
  14. 14. Starting possessions at the 25-yd line creates the possibility of a potential of 12 offensive plays for each team, per possession, (barring penalties). Even if it’s rare that many occur, the system is designed to enable it.<br />Starting possessions at the 25-yd line also results in more missed field goals when no yardage is gained, or yardage is lost.<br />Both teams must attempt a 2-pt conversion in the 3rd overtime period (and beyond), even if only a PAT (kick) is needed to win. This creates the possibility that both teams score touchdowns and make 2-pt conversions or both fail on 2-pt conversions, thus necessitating an additional overtime period.<br />Multiple overtime periods are common because teams are not only allowed to play for ties, it’s practically encouraged.<br />Theoretically, because ties are allowed, overtime could extend into an infinite number of additional periods.<br />COLLEGE OVERTIME RULE PROBLEMS/FLAWS<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />14<br />
  15. 15. In 2010 the NFL adopted a post-season adjustment allowing both teams possessions if the first team scores a field goal and not a touchdown.<br />Both teams are still not guaranteed possessions.<br />The game can extend 15 additional minutes, and beyond.<br />Teams aren’t forced to play to win. <br />There’s recognition of a deficiency. But the resolution leaves much to be desired. <br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />15<br />2010 NFL POST-SEASONOVERTIME MODIFICATIONS<br />
  16. 16. The ideal overtime scenario simultaneously satisfies:<br />NFL League Office/NCAA (Governing Body)<br />NFL TV Partners/NCAA TV Partners<br />NFL Sponsors/NCAA Sponsors<br />NFL Owners/NCAA Universities (Conferences)<br />NFL Players/NCAA Players<br />NFL Fans/NCAA Fans<br />IDEAL OVERTIME SYSTEM BENEFITS EVERYONE INVOLVED<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />16<br />
  17. 17. Both teams get 1 possession from the 10-yard line in a goal-to-go situation.<br />Teams must play to win and can not play to tie.<br />If the team with the first offensive possession doesn’t score, the team with the second offensive possession can win with a field goal or touchdown.<br />If the team with the first offensive possession scores a field goal, the team with the second offensive possession must score a touchdown.<br />If the team with the first offensive possession scores a touchdown and successful PAT (kick), the team with the second offensive possession must score a touchdown and attempt a 2-pt conversion.<br />If the team with the first offensive possession scores a touchdown and successful 2-pt conversion, the team with the second offensive possession must score a touchdown and attempt a 2-pt conversion.<br />If a PAT (kick) or 2-pt conversion fails, the ball is dead.<br />If a PAT (kick) is blocked or turnover occurs on a conversion attempt, the ball is dead. <br />“DECISIVE OVERTIME” SYSTEMBASIC RULES <br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />17<br />
  18. 18. Teams can score on offense, defense or special teams. <br />If a team scores on defense or special teams by returning a fumble, interception or blocked kick for a touchdown, the returning team wins and the game is over. <br />If neither team scores during the first 2 possessions of Decisive Overtime, both teams score touchdowns and fail on PAT (kick) attempts or both teams score touchdowns and 2-pt conversions, there will be an additional “1-play Decisive Overtime” period. <br />There is only one coin toss in Decisive Overtime. The winner of the coin toss can choose to start on offense or defense. In the event an additional “1-play Decisive Overtime” period is necessary, the loser of the original overtime coin toss chooses offense or defense.<br />In a “1-play Decisive Overtime” period, the ball is placed on the 2-yd line and the offense must attempt to score a 2-pt conversion.<br />If the offense successfully converts, they are awarded 2 points and the win. If the offense does not convert, then the defense is awarded 2 points and the win.<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />18<br />“DECISIVE OVERTIME” SYSTEMADVANCED RULES <br />
  19. 19. A winner is guaranteed in the shortest possible time and fairest manner.<br />Player exposure to additional time on field/potential injuries is minimized.<br />Intensity and excitement are greatly increased, benefitting players, fans, tv partners, owners, sponsors etc.<br />Exciting goal line stand situations are created. The greatest drama in sporting events occurs when the outcome can be altered on the final play.<br />Strategy now enters into every aspect of overtime, including the coin toss. Because teams must play to win, they will not always choose defense first, as is the case in college football. Now scoring with the 1st offensive possession forces the team with the 2nd offensive possession (defense first) to score to win, not tie.<br />In most cases a winner will be determined in the first Decisive Overtime period.<br />A “1-play Decisive Overtime” period determines an immediate winner, if a second overtime period is necessary.<br />DECISIVE OVERTIME IMPROVES THE GAME EXPERIENCE FOR ALL INVOLVED<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />19<br />
  20. 20. The drama of the unexpected combined with high-pressure moments heightens the sports experience for all involved.<br />Decisive Overtime intensifies the resolution of games not decided in regulation.<br />Revenue and ratings will increase utilizing Decisive Overtime.<br />Ad/sponsorship packages can be created/enhanced specific to Decisive Overtime.<br />MAXIMIZE EXCITEMENT, INTENSITY, STRATEGY AND REVENUE OPPORTUNITIES<br />"Decisive Overtime"TM-Jason Mathas © Copyright 2010-11 Jason@JasonMathas.com<br />20<br />

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