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JUVENILE DELINQUENCY
GroupMembers:
KesianBennett
JaphiaBeckford
RushardBlake
CrissiaGraham
AstleyJames
SamanthaHewitt
Aria...
CAD NEWS
TOP STORIES
What is Juvenile Delinquency and how is it a social issue in Jamaica?
How is Juvenile Delinquency recognized...
BREAKING NEWS
DEFINITION JUVENILE DELINQUENCY
According to Psychology Dictionary Juvenile Delinquency is
illegal behaviour by a minor t...
JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AS A SOCIAL ISSUE
 Social Issue/ problem-Social problems are societal induced conditions that
harms ...
JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AS A SOCIAL ISSUE CONT’
It puts a strain on our government and economy because business
owners suffe...
HOW JUVENILE DELINQUENCY CAN BE RECOGNIZED IN THE
TEACHING/LEARNING ENVIRONMENT.
In 2006 the Gleaner published an article...
PICTURES OF JUVENILE DELINQUENCY IN THE
LEARNING/TEACHING ENVIRONMENT
STATISTICS FROM A WEST INDIAN MEDICAL JOURNAL
(2011)
A fifth of 15-19-year olds reported involvement in violence in the l...
STATISTICS FROM A WEST INDIAN MEDICAL JOURNAL
(2011) CONT’
 In 2002, adolescent males accounted for 22% of total visits a...
MEDIA SOURCES
In 2010 The Gleaner published an article entitled Juvenile Crime
spurs call for Western rehab center. Membe...
MEDIA SOURCES CONT’
 In January 2014 the Gleaner published an article entitled Prison Schools? Oh
come on! According to t...
FORMS OF DELINQUENCY
 According to Bura (2007), there are four forms of delinquency:
 Individual- one person is involved...
EXISTING MEASURES THAT ADDRESS JUVENILE
DELINQUENCY
 The ministry of Justice received funding from the United Nations
Chi...
EXISTING MEASURES THAT ADDRESS JUVENILE
DELINQUENCY
 This is aligned with the UN Rules for Protection of Juveniles
Depriv...
IMPLICATIONS ON TEACHERS
Emotional implication- The teacher my feel threaten by students
because of their social backgrou...
IMPLICATIONS ON TEACHERS CONT’
 Professional implication- Teachers may feel frustrated and start conducting themselves
in...
IMPLICATIONS ON STUDENTS
 School attrition- students will feel discouraged to attend classes. They may start
skipping cla...
RELEVANT SUGGESTIONS
The implementation of Safe School officers
Effective PTA’s
Conducting workshops and seminars with ...
REFERENCES
 American Psychology Association. (2000). Juvenile Delinquency . Retrieved March
22, 2014, from Society Websit...
REFERENCES CONT’
 The Sunday Gleaner. (2007). Inner city youths exposed to violence more delinquent.
Retrieved March 26, ...
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Juvenile delinquency

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This portrays Juvenile Delinquency as a social issue in Jamaica

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Juvenile delinquency

  1. 1. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY GroupMembers: KesianBennett JaphiaBeckford RushardBlake CrissiaGraham AstleyJames SamanthaHewitt ArianaMason ChadworthTucker AnnikaCarr
  2. 2. CAD NEWS
  3. 3. TOP STORIES What is Juvenile Delinquency and how is it a social issue in Jamaica? How is Juvenile Delinquency recognized in the teaching/learning environment? The existing measures tackling the issue Implications of Juvenile Delinquency for teachers and students in Jamaica Relevant suggestions to combat this social issue in our country.
  4. 4. BREAKING NEWS
  5. 5. DEFINITION JUVENILE DELINQUENCY According to Psychology Dictionary Juvenile Delinquency is illegal behaviour by a minor that would be considered criminal against the state (vandalism, petty theft, auto theft, arson, rape etc) (2000).
  6. 6. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AS A SOCIAL ISSUE  Social Issue/ problem-Social problems are societal induced conditions that harms any segment of the population. Social problems are also related to acts and conditions that violate the norms and values found in society. (Oxford Pocket Dictionary 2007)  Juvenile Delinquency is a social issue because it is an issue that affects the society. It affects the government, community members and the economy.
  7. 7. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AS A SOCIAL ISSUE CONT’ It puts a strain on our government and economy because business owners suffer huge losses and the government has to fund facilities in order to promote the rehabilitation of juveniles.
  8. 8. HOW JUVENILE DELINQUENCY CAN BE RECOGNIZED IN THE TEACHING/LEARNING ENVIRONMENT. In 2006 the Gleaner published an article entitledAddressing Juvenile Delinquency. It highlighted the wounding of two teachers at St. Thomas Technical High and Knowklva Technical High in Hanover.
  9. 9. PICTURES OF JUVENILE DELINQUENCY IN THE LEARNING/TEACHING ENVIRONMENT
  10. 10. STATISTICS FROM A WEST INDIAN MEDICAL JOURNAL (2011) A fifth of 15-19-year olds reported involvement in violence in the last twelve months with males reporting a higher frequency than females. Similar findings were reported in the Jamaica Youth Risk and Resiliency survey (2005), a school based survey, among a nationally representative sample of 10-15-year olds . Twenty-two per cent of male adolescents, 10-18 years, reported carrying weapons and seventeen per cent were involved in a gang . Crime statistics (1999) recorded that 13-19-year olds accounted for 24.2% of persons arrested for murders, shootings, rape and carnal abuse . Despite these daunting figures, it is important to note that the majority of adolescents do not get involved in crime or violent behaviour.
  11. 11. STATISTICS FROM A WEST INDIAN MEDICAL JOURNAL (2011) CONT’  In 2002, adolescent males accounted for 22% of total visits and 24% of injury visits to the accident and emergency (A&E) departments of all government hospitals. As adolescent males make up 10% of the total population, they are disproportionately affected by violence. Children and young people, 15-24 years, make up 40% of murder victims according to the national crime statistics.  In addition, the Caribbean Youth Survey reported that one out of every thirteen students has been knocked unconscious at least once from a fight or other violent act. Even where they are not direct victims of crime, many adolescents are affected. Over 30% of adolescents reported concern about fighting or violence issues at home while 50% worry about violence in their communities. Dealing in and using drugs contribute significantly to crime and some adolescents are very aware of the violence from drug deals going bad or from the protection of "turf" in their community and school.
  12. 12. MEDIA SOURCES In 2010 The Gleaner published an article entitled Juvenile Crime spurs call for Western rehab center. Members of the JCF reported on the number of cases of violence and criminal activities involving teenage boys and girls. Homocides in the islands were nearing 1200 for that year alone with adolescents being the prominent perpetrators!
  13. 13. MEDIA SOURCES CONT’  In January 2014 the Gleaner published an article entitled Prison Schools? Oh come on! According to the JCF Reach, Planning & Legal Services Branch (RPLSB) 74% of inmates in Jamaica had attended non-traditional high schools. The education Minister Ronald Thwaites stated that “criminals are not born they are bred, and it is not the schools that have been churning at the bulk of misfits who have added up in the country’s prisons. The schools do not create criminals by themselves!”
  14. 14. FORMS OF DELINQUENCY  According to Bura (2007), there are four forms of delinquency:  Individual- one person is involved in the acts and this is said to be a result of psychological problems.  Group Supported- the acts are committed in companionship with others who are already delinquent.  Organized- formally organized groups governed by values and norms that govern behaviour.  Situational- deeply rooted, no deep commitments are involved, since the juvenile has little to lose if they get caught. This is as a result of family restraints.
  15. 15. EXISTING MEASURES THAT ADDRESS JUVENILE DELINQUENCY  The ministry of Justice received funding from the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) under the Child Protection Programme to update the national plan of action for child justice (established in 2006).  The article also reported that children brought before a court will no longer be sent to correctional facilities, instead they will be sent to participate in diversionary programmes to facilitate their rehabilitation. (The Daily Gleaner 2010)
  16. 16. EXISTING MEASURES THAT ADDRESS JUVENILE DELINQUENCY  This is aligned with the UN Rules for Protection of Juveniles Deprived of their liberty which was adopted by the General Assembly Dec. 14. 1990.  Additionally, training sessions have been conducted in order to facilitate in educating judges, prosecutors, clerks of court, children’s officers etc in the area of child rights and responsibilities and international protocol. (The Gleaner 2010)
  17. 17. IMPLICATIONS ON TEACHERS Emotional implication- The teacher my feel threaten by students because of their social background. Teachers may also feel discouraged to teach the class or even have emotional breakdowns; however, Teachers will have to be firm, brave and vigilant in handling their students.
  18. 18. IMPLICATIONS ON TEACHERS CONT’  Professional implication- Teachers may feel frustrated and start conducting themselves in unprofessional ways (shouting at the students, cursing, hitting).  Teachers may also be reluctant to go to class and will start to consider changing careers. Teachers will have to be determined to work with their students and build their self- motivation in an effort to remind themselves that they should remain professional at all times.  Additionally, teachers may have to help their students seek counseling and proper guidance. In an effort to help delinquent students, teachers will need to call in parents or guardians to discover the root cause of delinquency and how best to approach the issue.
  19. 19. IMPLICATIONS ON STUDENTS  School attrition- students will feel discouraged to attend classes. They may start skipping classes and eventually stop attending school. Students will have to seek counselling and motivation and assist the teachers in putting a stop to delinquency in the classroom.  Bullying- Students in the class may be bullied by delinquent students. Some may even be pressured to join the other delinquents. Students need to be firm and stand up for themselves and stop letting others take advantage of them.
  20. 20. RELEVANT SUGGESTIONS The implementation of Safe School officers Effective PTA’s Conducting workshops and seminars with students, parents and guidance counsellors.
  21. 21. REFERENCES  American Psychology Association. (2000). Juvenile Delinquency . Retrieved March 22, 2014, from Society Website: http://www.apa.org/topics/juveniledelinqency/index.aspx  Bura, R. (2007). What are the four main types of juvenile delinquency. Retrieved March 26, 2014, from Society Website: www.preservearticles.com  National Plan of Action for Child Justice. (2011). PDF.  Oxford Pocket School Dictionary. (2007). Oxford University press  The Daily Gleaner. (2006). Addressing juvenile delinquency. Print.  The Daily Gleaner. (2010). Government gets funding for juvenile-rehab drive. Print.  The Daily Gleaner. (2010). Juvenile crime spurs call for western rehab centre. Print.
  22. 22. REFERENCES CONT’  The Sunday Gleaner. (2007). Inner city youths exposed to violence more delinquent. Retrieved March 26, 2014, from: http://jamaica- gleaner.com/gleaner/20071028/news/  The Daily Gleaner. (2014). Prison Schools? Oh come on! Print.  West Indian Medical Journal. (2011). Vol.60 no.2 Mona. Retrieved March 26, 2014, from: http://caribbean.scielo.org/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&p

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