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Education and british rule

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All about the education system under british rule in india......

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Education and british rule

  1. 1. Limitations of British policies of education • The British wanted to use modern education to strengthen the foundations of their political authority in India. Not many people were educated. Thus, differences started to occur between the few educated and the masses. • Early education in Indian commenced under the supervision of a guru. Education in India in its traditional form was closely related to religion. Some famous institutions were of Taxila and Nalanda. But due to British rule the traditional system of India declined , especially after 1844. • Also, the education of women was highly neglected. They were only allowed to sit at home and do the household work. No universities were set up for girls till 1916. Only a few women could read and write. • There was no sort of technological education for the Indians during the colonial rule. The Famous Institute Of Taxila
  2. 2. During the British rule in India the downwards filtration theory was adopted in the country. The downwards filtration theory had the following two chief characteristics: 1. To educate only the high class people in order to give them higher posts in the administration with a view to strengthening the roots of British empire in the Country. 2. When the higher class people would receive English education their culture would be improved and the general public would accept them as their models. As a result, the lower class people would also be educated after being influenced by the higher class people. But this practice never worked. GROWTH OF NATIONAL EDUCATION In 1906 Indian nationalist leaders formed a National Council Of Education for imparting education to all the sections of the society.
  3. 3. Central Hindu School in Benaras established by Annie Besant in July 1898. Muhammedan Anglo-Oriental College(MAO) in Aligarh was established by Sayed Ahmad Khan in1875. National Muslim University was established by Sayyid Ahmad Baraveli in Aligarh in the year 1875-78.  New English School(1880s) in Bombay was founded by Bal Gangadhar Tilak who was a scholar, mathematician, philosopher, and militant nationalist and helped lay the foundation for India’s independence. National Council of Education1906 in Calcutta had Aurobindo Ghosh as the principal. The first women’s university was established by Dhonde Keshav Karve in Poona in 1916 Shreemati Nathibai Damodar Thackersey (SNDT) is the first women’s university set up. Amu is a public university funded by the central government of india. Central Hindu University is located in Varanasi in Uttar Pradesh. It is the largest residential university in Asia.
  4. 4. CENTRAL HINDU SCHOOL BY ANNIE BESANT. MUHAMMEDAN ANGLO-ORIENTAL COLLEGE BY SYED AHMED KHAN. NATIONAL MUSLIM UNIVERSITY BY SAYYID AHMAD BARAVELI.
  5. 5. NEW ENGLISH SCHOOL BY BAL GANGADHAR TILAK NATIONAL COUNCIL OF EDUCATION WITH AUROBINDO GHOSE AS ITS PRINCIPAL IN 1906 SNDT BY DHONDO KESHAV KARVE
  6. 6. ESTABLISHMENT OF UNIVERSITIES Baroda University  The idea of establishing a University at Baroda had engaged the attention of the Government of the former State of Baroda and its educational advisers long before the question of regional universities and reconditioning of higher education to suit the cultural educational needs of particular areas had taken root in the country. The concept was first visualized by Dr. Jackson, when, as Principal of the Baroda College in the 1908, he advocated the establishment of a Science Institute at Baroda on an improved and independent basis.  In 1916 and in 1919 review commodities recommended setting up a civic university at Baroda. In 1926, the Baroda University Commission was appointed which submitted its reports in 1929. Finally the Baroda University was approved by the legislative assembly in 1949.
  7. 7.  The university grew out of the work of Sir Syed Ahmad Khan, the great Muslim reformer and statesman, who in the aftermath of the Indian War of Independence of 1857 felt that it was important for Muslims to gain education and become involved in the public life and government services in India. Raja Jai Kishan helped Sir Syed in establishing the university. In 1877, Sir Syed founded the Muhammadan Anglo Oriental College in Aligarh and patterned the college after Oxford and Cambridge universities that he had visited on a trip to England. His objective was to build a college in tune with the British education system but without compromising its Islamic values. Sir Syed's son, Syed Mahmood, who was an alumnus of Cambridge prepared a proposal for an independent university to the ‘Muhammadan Anglo-Oriental College Fund Committee’ upon his return from England in 1872. This proposal was adopted and subsequently modified. Syed Mahmood continued to work along with his father in founding the college. It was also around this time that a movement began to have it develop into a university. To achieve this goal, expansions were made and more academic programs added to the curriculum of the college. A school for girls was established in 1907. By 1920 the college was transformed into the Aligarh Muslim University. In 1927, a school for the blind was established, and in the following year, a medical school was attached to the university. By the end of the 1930s, the university had also developed its engineering faculty.

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