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Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7706186
What started out as a Japanese Kimono?• In the olden days, the Japaneseterm, kimono, literally translates tosomething to w...
Jomon Period KimonoWith the hunting andgathering lifestyle of theJapanese during theera, the traditionalJapanese clothing ...
Yayoi Period Kimono• With the introduction of rice agriculture, the Japanese kimono was said to be a loose garment withhol...
Kofun Period Kimono• The first silk kimono was made during this time and the kimono style was inspired bythe Chinese and K...
Asuka Period Kimono• With the development of the sewing methods, the Kofun-period jacket orkimono robe was made longer and...
Nara Period Kimono• The early Nara Period YoroCode required that all kimonorobes be crossed left overright, like the Chine...
Heian Period Kimono• The Japanese wore their kimono in layers and the further development ofkimono-dyeing procedures also ...
Edo Period KimonoResist-dyeing, or Yuzen dyeing, developed during this period, thus the kimono hadmore colorful and artist...
Meiji Period Kimono• Some members of the elite, especially the men, started to wear Western-styleclothing, like business s...
• Learn more about the history of Japanesekimonos, the occasions for wearing thekimono, and the basic types of Japanesekim...
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The Evolution of the Design of the Japanese Kimono

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Step into the colorful world of the Japanese kimono and learn how this Asian clothing evolved through the years and became today as one of world's most ornate traditional clothing.

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The Evolution of the Design of the Japanese Kimono

  1. 1. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7706186
  2. 2. What started out as a Japanese Kimono?• In the olden days, the Japaneseterm, kimono, literally translates tosomething to wear and encompassthe different types of clothing thatwere normally worn by the Japanese,but now, it has come to refer to thetraditional Japanese clothing.
  3. 3. Jomon Period KimonoWith the hunting andgathering lifestyle of theJapanese during theera, the traditionalJapanese clothing wassaid to have been madeof fur and was drapedloosely around the body.Image Source: http://www.rekihaku.ac.jp/others/press/p091014.html
  4. 4. Yayoi Period Kimono• With the introduction of rice agriculture, the Japanese kimono was said to be a loose garment withholes to put the arms through and which enabled their wearer to be comfortable while working onthe rice fields. The geta, or wooden sandals, which are traditionally paired today with the casualJapanese Yukata, was said to be developed.Image Source: http://www.iuk.ac.jp/korean/Japanology/japanology.html
  5. 5. Kofun Period Kimono• The first silk kimono was made during this time and the kimono style was inspired bythe Chinese and Korean robes, which were closed to the front and tied at the waistwithout buttons and had skirts or trousers, which were often completed with abrightly-colored robe.Image Source: http://www.alcdsb.on.ca/~mart/junior/2006gr5/japancassy06.htm
  6. 6. Asuka Period Kimono• With the development of the sewing methods, the Kofun-period jacket orkimono robe was made longer and with wider sleeves.Image Source: http://web.mit.edu/jpnet/kimono/history-asuka.html
  7. 7. Nara Period Kimono• The early Nara Period YoroCode required that all kimonorobes be crossed left overright, like the Chinese, whichbecame the convention ofhow the Japanese kimonorobe is wrapped until today.• The process of dyeing thekimono was also developedduring this period and thebasic kimono was mostlymade of one color.
  8. 8. Heian Period Kimono• The Japanese wore their kimono in layers and the further development ofkimono-dyeing procedures also paved the way for colorful, seeminglyartistically-worked kimonos and wearing season-specific kimono colors wasconsidered a norm.Image Source:http://www.international.ucla.edu/asia-archive/lessons/clockwood/EastAsia.htmlImage Source: http://kodabar.blogspot.com/2012/02/chinese-tuesday-history-of-kimonohanfu.html
  9. 9. Edo Period KimonoResist-dyeing, or Yuzen dyeing, developed during this period, thus the kimono hadmore colorful and artistic textiles and became single-layered once more. The sleevesof the kimono were made longer, especially among unmarried women, the obi sashwas made wider, and several techniques of tying the latter came into fashion. Thekimono also became an indicator of social status and the use of subdued colored-kimonos also became common.Image Source: http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/k/kimono-edo-period-1615-1868/
  10. 10. Meiji Period Kimono• Some members of the elite, especially the men, started to wear Western-styleclothing, like business suits for work, and wear the kimono only at home.Image: http://www.kimonoboy.com/short_history.htmlImage: http://steamfashion.livejournal.com/1062296.html
  11. 11. • Learn more about the history of Japanesekimonos, the occasions for wearing thekimono, and the basic types of Japanesekimono and kimono robes onAsianIdeas.com.

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