Tick Born Meningitis

783 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
783
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
9
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Tick Born Meningitis

  1. 1. The role of GP in prevention of tick-borne meningoencephalitis Professor Janko Kersnik, PhD, MSc, MD FM Department Medical School Ljubljana and Maribor Primož Kušar, MSc, MD Primary Health Care Centre Ljubljana
  2. 2. Aims of the presentation  The importance of primary care approach in primary prevention  The role of family doctors  Good practice
  3. 3. Burden of the disease  Tick borne disease  Endemic - The endemic area spreads  In Slovenia 153-532 new cases per year - yearly incidence 13/100,000, 3rd place in Europe  There isn’t any specific treatment – effective immunisation
  4. 4. Burden of the disease  The disease is lethal in approximately 1.2% of cases and  leaves 15-20% of its survivors with permanent neurological damage  10,000 patients in Europe need hospital treatment.
  5. 5. Slovenian case  Immunisation rate in Slovenia is 10%  Immunisation rate in children is even lover - 4%  But the government claims quality care provided by paediatricians and by public health institutes  What goes wrong?
  6. 6. Good practice from Austria  Before 1981 prevalence same in Austria and Slovenia  In 1981 new campaign  Immunisation rate raised from 6% in 1981 to 86-90% in 2001
  7. 7. What made a success story? PATIENTS MEDIA GPs HELATH POLICY
  8. 8. The role of a GP? PRTEVENTION TREATMENT  Immunisation advice  First contact with  Patient motivation the patients  Offering  Difficult diagnosis immunisation  Follow up  Keeping records on immunisations
  9. 9. What do we have to know about vaccination?  Basic vaccination with three shuts  Can be done simultaneously – different place  First two shuts preferably during winter months  Serologically proven patients are immune to next course of the disease
  10. 10. Conclusions

×