LORI FIELD and KRISTIAN EVJU
DRAWINGS
LORI FILED - on a wooden panel I begin
to paint layers of encaustic. Using a heated
palette, I warm the paint until liquid...
Silverpoint drawing is done with a metal stylus
(real silver point embedded in wood) on a
prepared gesso surface. The gess...
„Cowboy“
gouache, sequins, beeswax, sliced tree trunk
2011
„Julie“
gouache, sequins, beeswax, sliced tree trunk
2011
„Monsieur Chevalier“
gouache, sequins, beeswax, sliced tree trunk
2011
„So Happy I Could Have a Chicken“
gouache, sequins, beeswax, sliced tree trunk
2011
„Flapper“
gouache, sequins, beeswax, sliced tree trunk
2011
„Marie Antoinette von Lederhosen“
silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper
2013
„Pierrot and Lemur„
silverpoint, black gesso, Fabriano paper
2013
„Mano Mano“
silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper
2013
„Black Eyed Susan“
silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper
2013
„Perfect Storm“
silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper
2013
„Little Eve“
silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper
25,1 x 8,8 cm
2013
„Little Lioness“
silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper
30,1 x 12,2 cm
2013
„Catastrophic Success“
silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper
18 x 13 cm
2013
„Fris“
silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper
18 x 12,5 cm
2013
KRISTIAN EVJU
Dark-River II
60 x 120 cm
pencil on paper on wood
2013
Kristian Evju – Artist Statement
I am intrigued by visual perception and how
our conscious and subconscious filtering
proc...
Dark-River III
60 x 120 cm
pencil on paper on wood
2013
Dark-River IV
60 x 120 cm
pencil on paper on wood
2013
janinebeangallery
Torstraße 154
10115 Berlin
phone 0049 (0) 30 417 671 68
info@janinebeangallery.com
www.janinebeangallery...
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013
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Lori field kristianevju_janinebeangallery_2013

  1. 1. LORI FIELD and KRISTIAN EVJU DRAWINGS
  2. 2. LORI FILED - on a wooden panel I begin to paint layers of encaustic. Using a heated palette, I warm the paint until liquid, building up to 15 layers of encaustic (pigmented beeswax and resin). After applying the layers, I begin to alter the surface with a variety of techniques. I use a heat gun and stamp the heated wax with wooden carved blocks, score the surface with dental tools and fill the indentations with oil sticks. I make impressions with pieces of lace and metal stamps. After scoring the surface I repaint with more layers of encaustic to fill in the markings. Once the wax cools, I scrape back the surface with razor blades to reveal inlays of color upon color and reveal under-layers. This process prepares and smooths the surface to receive my drawings. Before beginning to paint, I’ve drawn detailed colored pencil figures and faces on rice paper and cut them out. Once the drawings are ready, I heat up unpigmented encaustic and soak the back of the drawings. I sew into the figures with the lurex thread I use to indicate a ‘heartbeat’. The cut drawings are then placed in position on the encaustic backgrounds. I gently heat the drawings and rub them down into the wax, gently but firmly, with a bookmaking tool. I then sometimes add small collage elements. I then heat beeswax on my palette until liquid. After it’s melted, I pour the beeswax over the painting. Afterwards, I leave it to cool for awhile. I scrape the poured beeswax surface of the painting with blades revealing what’s obscured. The pouring makes the wax smooth and cloudy. I scrape down and stop before I rip the delicate drawing just beneath. The top layer might have goldleaf, printing, or stenciling and is fused with an all-over heating to harden it.
  3. 3. Silverpoint drawing is done with a metal stylus (real silver point embedded in wood) on a prepared gesso surface. The gesso is a rabbit skin glue and chalk based one that has to be heated on the stove and applied to the paper or board surface while warm. I heat the gesso and apply 15 to 20 coats in order to prepare the surface to receive the markings from the silverpoint. I wait for it to dry between coats and alternate directions of the coats as they are applied. After the gesso is completely dried (at least 72 hours) I lightly sand the top surface with an extra fine jewelers sandpaper to make it as smooth as possible. I then begin the drawing. I have to work slowly and carefully because unlike pencil, silverpoint cannot be erased. After the drawing is finished it eventually will tarnish as it oxidizes due to sulfer content in the air much like silverware does in the drawer in between polishing. That is part of the unique quality of the line and the fully oxidized drawing will have a softer burnished sepia tone to it.
  4. 4. „Cowboy“ gouache, sequins, beeswax, sliced tree trunk 2011
  5. 5. „Julie“ gouache, sequins, beeswax, sliced tree trunk 2011
  6. 6. „Monsieur Chevalier“ gouache, sequins, beeswax, sliced tree trunk 2011
  7. 7. „So Happy I Could Have a Chicken“ gouache, sequins, beeswax, sliced tree trunk 2011
  8. 8. „Flapper“ gouache, sequins, beeswax, sliced tree trunk 2011
  9. 9. „Marie Antoinette von Lederhosen“ silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper 2013
  10. 10. „Pierrot and Lemur„ silverpoint, black gesso, Fabriano paper 2013
  11. 11. „Mano Mano“ silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper 2013
  12. 12. „Black Eyed Susan“ silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper 2013
  13. 13. „Perfect Storm“ silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper 2013
  14. 14. „Little Eve“ silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper 25,1 x 8,8 cm 2013
  15. 15. „Little Lioness“ silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper 30,1 x 12,2 cm 2013
  16. 16. „Catastrophic Success“ silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper 18 x 13 cm 2013
  17. 17. „Fris“ silverpoint, white gesso, Fabriano paper 18 x 12,5 cm 2013
  18. 18. KRISTIAN EVJU
  19. 19. Dark-River II 60 x 120 cm pencil on paper on wood 2013
  20. 20. Kristian Evju – Artist Statement I am intrigued by visual perception and how our conscious and subconscious filtering processes can serve as cues to unlock memories and spin new threads of thought. I see myself as a director, or an assembler of conversations wherein the participants – be it animals, objects or persons – are frozen in a state of limbo; leaving it up to the viewer to infuse meaning or narrative. My compositions are like screenplays without scripts – epic dramas without action or movement. The moments they depict do not exist, and have never existed, yet they are not untrue. I have chosen to work with pencil on paper as a means to celebrate the slow construction of an image. Rather than mere renderings, I want each work to become an investigative journey of collaged research, observation and imagination. By using such a basic, limited medium, each work also become autobiographies. The visual accessability of the finished work is juxtaposed to the the careful engineering of signature marks that each rendering contains. and cloudy. I scrape down and stop before I rip the delicate drawing just beneath. The top layer might have goldleaf, printing, or stenciling and is fused with an all- over heating to harden it.
  21. 21. Dark-River III 60 x 120 cm pencil on paper on wood 2013
  22. 22. Dark-River IV 60 x 120 cm pencil on paper on wood 2013
  23. 23. janinebeangallery Torstraße 154 10115 Berlin phone 0049 (0) 30 417 671 68 info@janinebeangallery.com www.janinebeangallery.com © janinebeangallery

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