When the Digital Interrupts!Net GenerationandDigital Professionalismin Medical Education                 Janet Tworek, PhD...
Disclaimer    No industry affiliation    No preferred platform
OverviewIs there a Net Generation?Digital ProfessionalismEducation, Technology & Clerkship
Is there a Net Generation?
Author               Generation    Name              Evidence                     Birth YearsTapscott, 1997       1977-199...
•   Attitudes •   Career cycle •   Gender •   Geographic location •   Educational achievement •   Economic (“digital divid...
Student Experience
In which waysdo you expectlearners to be    Net Gen   learners?
DIGITAL PROFESSIONALISM
We allow ourselves tobelieve learners canand should followthe NetGen model
We allow our learners     to believe and then tryto fulfill the NetGen model
Consumerism as a driver
We view the digital as transient     when it is permanent
“Manage your brand”     - Gary Kovacs, CEO Mozilla
We both require and disregard the digital
We educate forsome but not all    digital
Reactionary Approaches• Regulations and sanctions• Discipline and punishment• “Do the right thing”Bonilla-Warford, 2011;Ch...
Why not?•   Legal precedent?•   Technology changes•   Multiple boundaries•   Who’s role?
Curriculum• Aligned• Integrated• Iterative
UofC UGME Curriculum
Y1 to 3 Progression“How to”           Application   Integrationin UGME
Orientation                         Clerkship Match                     RICC#1-5                                #3, 5, 8  ...
Peer Feedback Project               1                    2   3   4                  5• Distracts others with personal     ...
# 1 – 10# 5, 6 – e.g. EMR login# 5, 9, 10 – e.g. taking call# 3, 4, 9 – e.g. encrypted email# 9 – e.g. patient notes# 8, 9...
Not static…• Introductory year• K-12 education
Not just students…• Faculty & Staff  – Digital literacy  – Digital skills  – Professional modeling
Thank you!Feedback, questions, comments:     jktworek@gmail.com
Digital professionalism 2011
Digital professionalism 2011
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Digital professionalism 2011

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Overview of the supposed Net Generation, and Digital Professionalism. Set in the context of medical education, with a proposed curriculum infused in medical school. Presented at CCME 2011 and AMEE 2011. Made available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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  • Names: not the same. To those that “what’s in a name” matters, you can appreciate there is variability in the literature that has not been reconciled. For those who are not sticky on the name, let’s move on to this idea that exposure to media matters. Just by having technology, I’m different than you. This is based on the assumption that more technology is related to your birth year, ergo you are digitally savvy. This is problmeatic: it assumes the whole generation is the same, it assumes an end to the generation. But let’s be good critical appraisers of research and look at the evidence. Some is opinion. Notably, Prensky – video game company owner. Some is research –based. Variety of results. Focus in on big studies – even big studies don’t say “media = media savvy user”
  • Technology use is actually complexLet’s widen gaze, look at other researchCitations at bottom relate to various areas of research – business, education, economics, population statisticsShows that there are multiple factors in media adoption that cut across populations and generations – not just a generation issue!
  • So when we look at our students: Not all students the sameDigital use does NOT mean digitally savvyBut digital use might have helped students develop some skills we don’t give them credit forThis student knows how to meet standards of a community of peers, understands peer review, understands professionalism (but not all professionalism). Do we give our students credit for this in our institutions of higher learning?
  • Error in thinking about media #2
  • Error in thinking about media #1
  • http://eu.techcrunch.com/2011/05/02/heres-the-guy-who-unwittingly-live-tweeted-the-raid-on-bin-laden/
  • Diaspora as a potential solution
  • Our students are being searched before residency. Do they know this?
  • We expect students to use the digital but we don’t account for these activities in exams, simulation experiences, etc.
  • We expect students to use the digital but we don’t account for these activities in exams, simulation experiences, etc.
  • We often react like Darth Vader & the storm troopersCitations = authors who have said we need punitive frameworks or to do the right thing – what is the right thing when media changes, we live in a post-modern society?
  • Current UofC curriculum
  • All 10 points of digital professionalism framework are covered throughout the program, IN existing curricular moments AND we come back on the same points again but with fresh examples as they relate to students’ progress in the program and transition to clinical spaces. Example: Orientation5. Surveillance – IT user agreementUpdate – you are in med school = professional program = #2 – manage your access to FB, email3, 4 – Your actions reflect on you, UofC, profession. This is the start of how you manage being a professional and a personal life – just like MDs in rural AND urban areas. You are a visible representative held in different esteem in society. Introduction – Year 17. Working responsibly and positively within online communities. Posting professionally on LMS – obeying copyright, etc.
  • If I haven’t yet convinced you that techology is a part of medical education
  • Digital professionalism 2011

    1. 1. When the Digital Interrupts!Net GenerationandDigital Professionalismin Medical Education Janet Tworek, PhD Cand
    2. 2. Disclaimer No industry affiliation No preferred platform
    3. 3. OverviewIs there a Net Generation?Digital ProfessionalismEducation, Technology & Clerkship
    4. 4. Is there a Net Generation?
    5. 5. Author Generation Name Evidence Birth YearsTapscott, 1997 1977-1997 Media Online chat with 28 teens GenerationHowe, 2000 1982 - 2000 Millenials 500 high school seniors in southeastern U.S.Prensky, 2001 unspecified Digital Natives Exposure to mediaBeck and Wade, 1975 - 2004 Gaming Playing video games2004 Generation Survey business leadersRideout et al., “young Gen M 1999 report: 2,065 children aged 8-181999, Rideout et people aged 2004 report: 2,032 students ages 8-18al., 2005, Rideout 8 to 18” 2009 report: 2002 students ages 8–18et al., 2010Dede, 2005 unspecified Neomillenials Exposure to mediaOblinger and 1982–1991 Net Generation Exposure to mediaOblinger, 2005Ito, M. 2009 “Under the Digital Youth 659 semi-structured interviews, 28 diary studies, focus age of 25” group in 2005 interviews with 67 participants; 78 interviews; 363 survey respondents; 5,194 observation hours; 10,468 profiles on social sites; 15 online discussion group forums, and more than 389 videos.Kent, 2004 “young Young people Survey in 2001: n=1818 people ages Survey in 2003: n= 1471 9 – 18” Group semi-structured interviews: n=192 Family interviews: n=19 (representing 11 families)
    6. 6. • Attitudes • Career cycle • Gender • Geographic location • Educational achievement • Economic (“digital divide”) • Net NeutralityBarron, 2004; Caison et al, 2008; Hargittai, 2008; DiMaggio, Hargittai, Celeste, and Shafer,2004; Meng et al, 2010; Parasuraman, 2001; Slater, Crichton and Pegler, 2010; StatisticsCanada, 2009; US Bureau of Commerce, 2010; US Statistics Branch, 2010; Warschauer,2000
    7. 7. Student Experience
    8. 8. In which waysdo you expectlearners to be Net Gen learners?
    9. 9. DIGITAL PROFESSIONALISM
    10. 10. We allow ourselves tobelieve learners canand should followthe NetGen model
    11. 11. We allow our learners to believe and then tryto fulfill the NetGen model
    12. 12. Consumerism as a driver
    13. 13. We view the digital as transient when it is permanent
    14. 14. “Manage your brand” - Gary Kovacs, CEO Mozilla
    15. 15. We both require and disregard the digital
    16. 16. We educate forsome but not all digital
    17. 17. Reactionary Approaches• Regulations and sanctions• Discipline and punishment• “Do the right thing”Bonilla-Warford, 2011;Chretien, Greysen, Chretien, and Kind, 2009;Farnan et al, 2009;Kind, Genrich, Sodhi, and Chretien, 2010;MacDonald, Sohn, and Ellis, 2010;Mondoux, 2010
    18. 18. Why not?• Legal precedent?• Technology changes• Multiple boundaries• Who’s role?
    19. 19. Curriculum• Aligned• Integrated• Iterative
    20. 20. UofC UGME Curriculum
    21. 21. Y1 to 3 Progression“How to” Application Integrationin UGME
    22. 22. Orientation Clerkship Match RICC#1-5 #3, 5, 8 Emergency O&G Intro – Y1 Summer Electives Surgery #7, 9, 10 #1-10 Anesthesia Family Pediatrics HPOP – Y1 Psychiatry #3, 4, 7, & 10 Orientation to Y1’s Internal #1-10 #1-10* Y1 Y2 Y3 R1 PFSA – Y1 EMR Training #1-10 #5-10 Intro to Clerkship Orientation to Res #1-10 #1-10
    23. 23. Peer Feedback Project 1 2 3 4 5• Distracts others with personal • Stays on-task when using media in formal learning media for learning or patient events (e.g. cell phone texting consultations. during class, watching videos • Has professionally addressed in lecture). others’ inappropriate uses of• Sends emails of unprofessional media. wording or context to the class • Shares resources and/or list or to others. techniques that support• Is distracted by email, instant others’ learning or messaging or using media in professional advancement. off-task ways in formal • Is willing to ask for help or learning events and/or student consider new ways of using meetings. media.• Unprofessionally addresses others who are using media
    24. 24. # 1 – 10# 5, 6 – e.g. EMR login# 5, 9, 10 – e.g. taking call# 3, 4, 9 – e.g. encrypted email# 9 – e.g. patient notes# 8, 9, 10 – e.g. Copyright, citations in projects# 3, 4, 7 – e.g. Clin decision support tools# 1, 2, 5, 6 – e.g. social networking posts# 3, 4, 7 – e.g. behaviours & observationswhen using technology # 1 – 10
    25. 25. Not static…• Introductory year• K-12 education
    26. 26. Not just students…• Faculty & Staff – Digital literacy – Digital skills – Professional modeling
    27. 27. Thank you!Feedback, questions, comments: jktworek@gmail.com

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