Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Plate Heat Exchanger Lab Report Group B4

  • Be the first to comment

Plate Heat Exchanger Lab Report Group B4

  1. 1. February 3, 2014  University of California, San Diego  Department of NanoEngineering  La Jolla, CA 92093    To Whom It May Concern:  As requested, this “Plate Heat Exchanger” report includes the overall heat transfer coefficient by  varying hot and cold water flow rates in steady­state and batch operations.  We hope this report will satisfy the desired expectations. If you have any questions or concerns,  please contact us.    Sincerely,  Group B­4    Brandon Sanchez  Janet Mok  bobbyjoedik@gmail.com janet.mok14@gmail.com               Liliana Busanez Saman Hadavand  lilianabusanez@gmail.com hada4gold@gmail.com               Department of NanoEngineering,   Chemical Engineering      1 
  2. 2.       Plate Heat Exchangers    Lab 1 Report               Presented to the  University of California, San Diego  Department of Nanoengineering  CENG 176A  3 February 2015              Prepared by:    Group B­4    Lead Author  Section  Janet Mok  Letter of Transmittal, Abstract, Intro,  Conclusion  Liliana Busanez  Theory and Background  Brandon Sanchez  Results and Discussion  Saman Hadavand  Tech Memo and Presentation  2 
  3. 3. Abstract    The goal of the experiment was to understand the characteristics and design of a plate  heat exchanger, as well as to evaluate the effects of varying flow rates on the overall heat transfer  coefficient. The steady­state operation involved moving cold water from a source tank to a  receiving tank where the hot water stream exchanges heat with the cold water stream in the  source tank. In the batch operation, the cold water was pumped into the same tank, with constant  stirring, after exchanging heat with the hot water stream.  The data and results showed that in the  steady­state operation, the overall heat transfer coefficient increased as the mass flow rates  increased. However, it was seen that in the batch operation, the overall heat transfer coefficient  decreased as the temperature difference decreased.                                        3 
  4. 4. Table of Contents Introduction      pp. 5  Theory  Figure 1, Cocurrent Flow  Figure 2. Countercurrent Flow  pp. 6  Methods    pp. 9  Results    Figure 3. Measured Flow Rate  Figure 4. LMTD vs. time  pp. 11  Discussion    pp. 13  Conclusion    pp. 16   References    pp. 17  Appendices  Table A1. Batch data  Table A2. Steady­state data  Table A3. Calibration Batch  Table A4. Calibration Steady­state  pp. 18                    4 
  5. 5. Introduction    The Plate Heat Exchanger (PHE) Experiment uses common equipment found in heat  exchange processes used in industries such as: power, air conditioning, and biomedical  industries. The earliest development of PHEs was in response to increasingly strict requirements  from foods, particularly dairy products in the late nineteenth century. The very first patent for a  PHE was granted to the  german Albrecht Dracke, who proposed in 1878 the cooling of one  liquid by another, with each flowing in a layer on opposite sides of a series of plates¹. The  growing demand for energy conservation, while using sustainable technology and preserving the  environment, has lead to high performance, compact heat exchangers with increased energy  efficiency. The PHE design is decentralized in nature, and benefits include flexible sizing of  various plates to meet batch­processing heat load demands for sustaining hygienic conditions  common in food, and pharmaceutical product processing¹.  The PHE consists of a pack of gasketed corrugated metal plates, pressed together in a  frame, which allows fluid to flow through a series of parallel flow channels and exchange heat  through the thin metal plates³. Plate heat exchangers are used for transferring heat for any  combination of gas, liquid, and two­phase streams. The gaskets prevent leakage to the outside  and directs the fluids as desired⁴. Heat is then transferred from the warm fluid via the dividing  wall to the colder fluid in a pure counter­flow arrangement, which supplements the high  effectiveness of the PHEs.  The importance of the plate heat exchanger can be seen through the various structural  advantages that it has to offer. The plate surface corrugations promotes enhanced heat transfer by  means of promoting swirl or vortex flows and increased effective heat transfer area. The heat  5 
  6. 6. transfer coefficients obtained are significantly higher than other heat exchangers for comparable  fluid conditions, which leads to a much smaller thermal size¹. Because of their high heat transfer  coefficients and true counter­flow arrangement, PHEs are able to operate under very close  approach temperature conditions which results in up to 90% heat recovery¹. Another advantage  of PHEs is due to the thin channels created between the two adjacent plates, where the volume of  fluid contained in the heat exchanger is small. Therefore, it reacts to the process condition  changes in a rather short time transient and is easier to control¹. Because plates with different  surface patterns can be combined in a single PHE, different multi­pass arrangements can be  configured which enables better optimization of operating conditions¹.  In this experiment, in order to evaluate the overall heat transfer coefficient, we analyzed  different transient heat operating conditions for plate heat exchangers at varying hot and cold  flow rates. The heat exchanger transfer coefficient from batch heat operations, and under  continuous operations was used to evaluate results that can be applied to scale­up calculations as  in industry to transfer thermal energy in between mediums.  The Data logging VI was used to run  the experiment, and the flow rates and approach temperature difference were adjusted to set  operating conditions.    Background & Theory      Plate Heat Exchangers (PHE) promote well mixed flows along the plate with high  convective heat transfer coefficients that result from the inter­corrugation flow path. The plates  themselves confine fluid stream within the inter­plate flow channels. This enhances heat transfer  6 
  7. 7. and the resultant heat transfer coefficient  is significantly higher for PHE than the traditional  shell­and tube heat exchangers¹.  The plate­pack in gasketed PHEs is easily disassembled and reassembled. The thin  rectangular sheet metals plates are in between gaskets, assembled in a pack, and bolted in a  frame. Heat is transferred from the hot fluid via the plate wall to the colder fluid in counter flow  arrangement. The advantage of PHE compared to other highly compact exchangers include  thermal flexible sizing of plates, easy cleaning necessary for the food industry as mentioned, and  close approach temperature pure countercurrent­flow operations (~ ) that lead to highC1°   effectiveness of PHEs¹.  For PHE, there are three primary design flow arrangements for hot and cold fluid  arrangements that of parallel­flow, counter­flow, and multi­pass arrangement. Most common, is  cocurrent and countercurrent configurations:         Figure 1:​ Cocurrent  Figure 2:​ Countercurrent  Energy moves from hot fluid to a surface by convection, through the wall by thermal  conduction, and then by convection from the surface to the cold fluid. Heat convection is forced  within a heat exchanger and it is the convective transfer that governs its performances₅⁵. The  7 
  8. 8. overall heat transfer (or rate) equation in heat exchangers is given by the energy balance across  the separating wall:                     (1)C (T ) C (T ) AΔTQ = m c c h out − T c in = m h h h in − T c out = U LMTD    Q= Rate of heat transfer (duty), U= Overall heat transfer Coefficient, A= cross­sectionalhere,w   Area for heat transfer,  = Log Mean Temperature DifferenceTΔ LMTD   The Log Mean Temperature Difference (LMTD) is used to determine the temperature  driving force for ​heat transfer​ in flow systems. LMTD is constant along the length, and used  most notably with heat exchangers.                (2)    ,   are the bulk temperatures, or thehere, △T T )w 1 = ( h out − T c in T T )△ 2 = ( h in − T c out   temperature difference for countercurrent as demonstrated in Figure 2.  The overall heat transfer coefficient is determined for steady state and batch operations.  Heat losses or gains of a whole exchanger with the environment can be neglected. The steady  state operation equation to analyze the performance of the heat exchanger is                                                       (3)C dT dx AΔTm c / = U LMTD   Overall Heat Transfer Coefficient can be estimated for different fluids as well as the type  of heat exchanger system involved (PHE). Where the heat transfer coefficient, U, for water to  water heat exchangers, can be a typical transfer coefficient of about 2000  ².W m K][ / 2   8 
  9. 9. For the Batch Heating balance equations, the heat balance in a well­mixed tank can be  based on the cold side transfer, hot side transfer, heated by an external heat exchanger so the tank  temperature is the cold side inlet,  . The process conditions and heat load are varyingT c in   throughout the batch.  In batch heating, the required duty is a function of the changing batch temperature   as a function of time. where   and   are result of hot and cold mass flowTΔ LMTD △T 1 △T 2   rates, and differentiation of  , in consideration to the batch heat balance. Substituting in batchT c in   heating,  , to Eq.(1), the temperature time derivative cancels out. The equation for batchTΔ LMTD   as a function of time is given by:                                                    (4)n| | ]t− l T −T (t)h in c in T −T (0)h in c in = [ (K−1)ω ωc h m(Kω −ω )h c   The constant, K, is graphed in a semi­log plot, where from the slope K can be determined to  obtain the overall heat transfer coefficient using the following to determine U:                                                       (5)xp( ( ))K = e Cp UA 1 mc − 1 mh     Methods    This experiment involved using a plate heat exchanger and the PHE99_MAIN.vi for both  steady­state and batch operations. Three water tanks were used to test the plate heat exchanger in  order to determine the overall heat transfer coefficient. Two cold water tanks were filled with tap  water at about near room temperature. The lengths and widths were measured for both the cold  water tanks as well as the initial water level. Both operations involved cycling hot and cold water  throughout the system until a stable temperature has been reached. The Labview program  9 
  10. 10. PHE99_MAIN.vi was used to automatically turn on the pumps and record the Hot­in, Cold­in,  Hot­out, and Cold­out temperatures measured by the thermocouples positioned in the pipes.  While the procedure to execute the experiment for each operation was similar, there were some  differences in methods and use of equipment.  For the steady­state operation, two trials were performed by keeping the hot water flow  rate constant while varying the cold water flow rates. The cold water from one tank was moved  to the other in order to produce a steady group of data during a certain time interval, in which  there were minimal temperature fluctuations from a set thermocouple temperature reading. A  “From” tank and a “To” tank were first determined from the two cold water tanks. The valves  from the Cold­out stream and Cold­in stream were opened and closed respectively depending on  the labeled tank. Lastly, the hot and cold flow rate valves were both adjusted to the desired level.  The VI was then run and both hot water and cold water pumps were turned on and the  temperature data was recorded. Once the plate heat exchanger has reached steady­state, the VI  was stopped after 60 seconds of stable data. Between each trial, the water heater had to warm the  tank up to nearly fully hot.   Similar procedures were used for the batch operation, but this operation instead would be  circulating the cold water back into the same tank it was pumped from. Only one cold water tank  would be used whose level of water was not too high or too low. The depth of the water tank  would be recorded and the Cold­out and Cold­in stream valves were adjusted accordingly. The  rest of the procedure was the same as the steady­state operation except there had to be a  motorized consistent stirring in the cold water tank to allow the water temperature to achieve  10 
  11. 11. equilibrium before passing through the heat exchanger. The flow rates for both hot and cold  water should not be adjusted so that there is as little human input as possible.  Lastly the inline flow meter was calibrated to result in a good calibration curve. Error  could increase with increasing temperatures resulting in an inaccurate reading. A temperature  was established to run the calibration, and the “From tank was set to this particular temperature.  The temperatures of both tanks were recorded as well as the initial water level in the chosen  “To” tank. The cold water pump was switched on for one minute at a certain flow rate, and then  the time elapsed and new water level was then recorded.   After the experiment was finished, the water heater was turned down to the low setting  and the labview program was closed and shut down, accordingly.The data from the steady­state  and batch operations were then used to determine the overall heat transfer coefficient for this  particular plate heat exchanger.  Results    The cold stream flow rate was measured and varied over different time intervals. A  calibration graph was developed as shown in Figure 3. The hot stream was not used for  calibration as it was assumed that information on one of the flow streams would provide  identical information on the other. A slope of 1 on the calibration curve would indicate an ideal  flow meter. A slope of 1.0792 indicates an error in the calculated flow rate of being  approximately 8% higher than the flow rate displayed by the flow meter.    11 
  12. 12.   Figure 3​: Cold stream calibration for calculated flow rate vs. measured flow rate  Temperature data from the batch operations were used to solve for the log­mean  temperature differences according to Eqn. 2. T​H​ In​  values were averaged over the duration of the  trials due to minor fluctuations in boiler temperature. The negative values of the LMTD’s for the  trials were plotted against time as shown in Figure 4. The slopes of the curves for each trial were  extracted and used to solve for the value of K according to Eqn. 3. These K values were then  used to solve for the overall heat transfer coefficient according to Eqn. 4. These results along  with the parameters used in each equation are displayed in Table A1. The area of the heat  exchanger plate used is .0321 m​2​ . This value is multiplied by 7 to account for the 7 plates in the  heat exchanger. Note that the flow streams were adjusted by 7.92% due to calibration.    12 
  13. 13.   Figure 4:​ Plots of ­LMTD vs. time for batch trials  Temperature data from the steady state operation was averaged during the duration of the  trials due to minor fluctuations in temperature readings. The overall heat transfer coefficient was  determined by Eqn 1. Because Eqn. U was calculated using both hot and cold stream  information, which gives 2 values of U for each trial. This data along with temperature data is  displayed in Table A2.    Discussion    Data for the overall heat transfer coefficient was produced using flow rates that had not  been calibrated. Upon adjusting the flow rates, it was found that the overall heat transfer  coefficient increased for steady state results and decreased for batch results. These values along  with percent differences are displayed in Table A3 and A4, respectively. Noting that the flow  rate calibration is only correcting error in the flow meter readings of our data, it was found that  calibrating the mass flow rate will increase the value of U. This can be seen by analyzing Eq. 1.  13 
  14. 14. The area, temperature differences and heat capacities are the same values as before, therefore an  increase in the flow rate can only increase U. Hence, the overall heat transfer coefficient and the  mass flow rate are directly proportional for this system.   The batch results require more analysis due to the solution technique for calculating U.  When utilizing Eqn. 4, the values of the LHS are the same. The RHS has increased flow rates,  therefore the value of K decreases after calibration. When using Eqn. 5, the calculated U value is  smaller. This may be less intuitive than the steady state results because a misleading assumption  may lead one to conclude that increasing flow rates increases the heat transfer rate. The  temperature dynamics of the batch system may account for the results for increased hot and cold  inlet flow rates. A higher hot stream inlet flow rate would increase the cold stream outlet  temperature at a faster rate. This would also increase the cold stream inlet temperature at a faster  rate, which is also flowing faster into the heat exchanger. Because all streams are approaching  steady state temperatures at a faster rate, the overall heat transfer coefficient decreases as the  temperature differences between the hot and cold streams decreases.  The procedure for the flow rate calibration may have introduced error when developing  the calibration. The container used to fill the water from the cold stream hose had approximate  volume measurements and were not completely accurate. Although the volumes were  approximate on the container, our group agreed that measurement of the original water tub  intended for the procedure would introduce more error. This was concluded because the tub is  rounded and warped and doesn’t accurately represent a rectangular prism. Thus, the dimensions  of the tubs would introduce significant error in volume calculations. Calibration of the hot stream  may introduce error if the hot stream equipment contains more fouling due to high temperature  14 
  15. 15. streams. The thermal energy from the hot streams may loosen and distribute more particles  through the pipes than the cold streams, however it was assumed that the cold and hot stream  equipment was identical.  The results for U for the batch and steady state operations were not precise and ranged  from about 300 to 1900 W/m​2​ K. The largest source of error may be from assuming that U is a  constant and not a function of temperature. This may be detrimental in calculations because  depending on the temperature of the heat exchanger plates, U may be a higher or lower value.   The values of U​c​ and U​H ​for the steady state operation should theoretically be equal  values in a closed system. Sources of error are limited due to the simplicity of the system.  Temperatures read from the thermocouples may have introduced significant error because the  thermocouples were not calibrated with manual thermometer readings of the water tanks. By not  calibrating the thermocouples, temperature differences may actually be higher or lower, and will  definitely affect the values of U. The small amount of data analyzed for the steady state system  may not be enough to accurately represent the heat exchanger dynamics, and more trials would  need to be conducted to get more accurate results.   The batch operation results produced inconsistent U values of 1507, 298, 470 and 755  W/m​2​ K. After taking a look at Table A1 and noting the differences in H​2​O mass for each trial, it  may be concluded that the mass of H​2​O that went through the system had the greatest effect on  calculating U. This can be seen by Eqn. 4, as mass of water in the denominator will affect the  value of K, which will in turn affect the calculation of U in Eqn. 5. More trials would need to be  conducted with more variance in flow rates to extract consistent K values, and hence calculate a  better value of U.   15 
  16. 16. Conclusion  In conclusion, plate heat exchangers are used throughout a wide range of industries, such  as dairy and other hygienic industries, as well as in sustainable energy conservation and  biomedical industries. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the overall heat transfer  coefficient under both the steady­state and batch operations while varying hot and cold water  flow rates. It was found that for the steady­state operation, the overall heat transfer coefficient  increased with increasing flow rates, which shows that the overall heat transfer coefficient and  the mass flow rates are directly proportional. However for the batch operation, since all the  streams were approaching steady state temperatures at a faster rate, the overall heat transfer  coefficient decreases as the temperature differences between the hot and cold streams decreases.  Furthermore, the flow rate calibration of the plate heat exchanger indicated an 8% discrepancy  between the measured flow rate and the calculated flow rate. This indicates an error in the  calibration of the flow meter.    16 
  17. 17. References    [1]  Wang, L; Bengt, S; Manglik, R.M., Plate Heat Exchangers: Design, Applications and  Performance: Southampton: WIT, 2002.    [2] ​Perry, R. H., Green, D. W. (Eds.): Perry's Chemical Engineers' Handbook, 7th edition,  McGraw­Hill, 1997 , Section 11.    [3] Pinto, M. J.; Gut, J.A.W “A Screening Method For the Optimal Selection Of Plate Heat  Exchanger Configurations” ​Brazilian Journal of Chemical Engineering​ 27 May 2002: 433­439.  Print.     [4] Kakac, Sadik, and Hongtan Liu. ​Heat Exchangers Selection, Rating, and Thermal Design​.  Boca Raton: CRC Press, 2002. Print.    [5] Martinez, I; Heat Exchangers. ​Webserver.dmt​ [Online] ​1995­2015​, pp1­16  http://webserver.dmt.upm.es/~isidoro/bk3/c12/Heat%20exchangers.pdf​ (accesssed January 28,  2015).                17 
  18. 18. Appendices    Trial  T​H​ In​  (K)    T​C​ In​ (K)  C​p​ (J/kg  K)  W​c  (kg/s)   W​h  (kg/s)  Mass  H​2​O  (kg)  K  U  (W/m​2 K)  1  339.5  301.4  4184  .2045  .2052  27.63  1.0013  1507  2  334.8  293.41  4184  .2454  .0954  15.90  .9027  297.7  3  334.5  302.4  4184  .2045  .2052  8.327  1.0004  470.2  4  332.7  300.3  4184  .1363  .2045  14.76  1.104  755.2    Table A1:​ Batch data for determining overall heat transfer coefficient      Trial  T​H​ In   (K)    T​C​ In (K)  T​H​ Out   (K)    T​C​ Out (K)  W​c  (kg/s)   W​h  (kg/s)  U​H  (W/m​2​ K)  U​C  (W/m​2​ K)  U   % Diff.  1  327.7  292. 4  317.7  307.3  .1023  .2045  1557  1159  29.3  2  335.9  291. 7  323.0  310.0  .1363  .2045  1568  1761  11.6    Table A2: ​Steady state data for determining overall heat transfer coefficient      Overall Heat Transfer Coefficient (W/m​2​ K)    U​C  U​H  Trial  Uncalibrated  Calibrated  Uncalibrated  Calibrated  1  1159  1251  1557  1680  2  1761  1900  1568  1692      Table A3:​ Calibrated steady state values of overall heat transfer coefficient       18 
  19. 19.   Overall Heat Transfer Coefficient (W/m​2​ K)    Trial  Uncalibrated  Calibrated  % Difference  1  1556  1507  3.2  2  300.5  297.7  .936  3  474.9  470.3  .973  4  1008  755.2  28.68    Table A4:​ Calibrated batch values of overall heat transfer coefficient                                                           19 
  20. 20. TO: NanoEngineering Department Faculty  FROM: Brandon Sanchez, Saman Hadavand, Janet Mok, Liliana Busanez  DATE: January 30, 2015   SUBJECT: CVD    We propose to design a Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) reactor using the  COMSOL simulation. CVD is a chemical process essential to micro­electronic device  manufacturing. In this experiment we will conduct a simulation of a CVD reactor to understand  the kinetics of silane deposition. To do this, multiple variables will be adjusted including:  temperature, wafer packing density, pressure, inlet velocity, and mole fraction of hydrogen  present in the inlet. We expect to see an increase in the rate of silane deposition as temperature  increases. Furthermore, we believe that an increase in hydrogen mole fraction and inlet velocity  will increase the rate of silane production and thus its deposition in the reactor.  If you have any  concerns, please contact Saman Hadavand at (760) 884­9484.    20 

×