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NSTP.GLOBALWARMING.pptx

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NSTP.GLOBALWARMING.pptx

  1. 1. GLOBAL WARMING, DISASTER RISK REDUCTION AND MANAGEMENT AWARENESS
  2. 2. tanong mo saken WHAT IS GLOBAL WARMING?
  3. 3. GLOBAL WARMING -IS A LONG-TERM RISE IN THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE OF THE EARTH’S CLIMATE SYSTEM, AN ASPECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE SHOWN BY TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS AND BY MULTIPLE EFFECTS OF THE WARMING. THE TERM COMMONLY REFERS TO THE MAINLY HUMAN-CAUSED OBSERVED WARMING SINCE PRE-INDUSTRIAL TIMES AND ITS PROJECTED CONTINUATION THOUGH THERE WERE ALSO MUCH EARLIER PERIODS OF GLOBAL WARMING
  4. 4. EFFECTS OF GLOBAL WARMING
  5. 5. • Increase in average temperatures and temperature extremes
  6. 6. - One of the most immediate and obvious effects of global warming is the increase in temperatures around the world. The average global temperature has increased by about 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit (0.8 degrees Celsius) over the past 100 years, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). • Increase in average temperatures and temperature extremes
  7. 7. • Extreme weather events
  8. 8. • Extreme weather events - Changes in climate can cause the polar jet stream — the boundary between the cold North Pole air and the warm equatorial air — to migrate south, bringing with it cold, Arctic air. This is why some states can have a sudden cold snap or colder-than-normal winter, even during the long- term trend of global warming. Global warming may also lead to extreme weather other than cold or heat extremes.
  9. 9. • Iceberg melting
  10. 10. • Iceberg melting - One of the most dramatic effects of global warming is the reduction in Arctic sea ice. Sea ice hit record-low extents in both the fall and winter of 2015 and 2016, meaning that at the time when the ice is supposed to be at its peak, it was lagging. The melt means there is less thick sea ice that persists for multiple years. That means less heat is reflected back into the atmosphere by the shiny surface of the ice and more is absorbed by the comparatively darker ocean, creating a feedback loop that causes even more melt, according to NASA's Operation IceBridge.
  11. 11. • Sea level and ocean acidification
  12. 12. - Melting polar ice in the Arctic and Antarctic regions, coupled with melting ice sheets and glaciers across Greenland, North America, South America, Europe and Asia, are expected to raise sea levels significantly. And humans are mostly to blame: In the IPCC report released on Sept. 27, 2013, climate scientists said they are at least 95 percent certain that humans are to blame for warming oceans, rapidly melting ice and rising sea levels, changes that have been observed • Sea level and ocean acidification
  13. 13. tanong mo si kiel HOW DO WE PREVENT IT?
  14. 14. - As individuals, we can help by taking action to reduce our personal carbon emissions. But to fully address the threat of global warming, we must demand action from our elected leaders to support and implement a comprehensive set of climate solutions: - Expand the use of renewable energy and transform our energy system to one that is cleaner and less dependent on coal and other fossil fuels. • § Solar • § Wind Power • § Geothermal • § Hydropower
  15. 15. - Place limits on the amount of carbon that polluters are allowed to emit. - Reduce tropical deforestation and its associated global warming emissions.
  16. 16. Disaster
  17. 17. - A disaster is a sudden, calamitous event that seriously disrupts the functioning of a community or society and causes human, material, and economic or environmental losses that exceed the community’s or society’s ability to cope using its own resources. Though often caused by nature, disasters can have. - (VULNERABILITY+ HAZARD ) / CAPACITY = DISASTER - A disaster occurs when a hazard impacts on vulnerable people. The combination of hazards, vulnerability and inability to reduce the potential negative consequences of risk results in disaster.
  18. 18. Vulnerability
  19. 19. - Vulnerability in this context can be defined as the diminished capacity of an individual or group to anticipate, cope with, resist and recover from the impact of a natural or man-made hazard. The concept is relative and dynamic. Vulnerability is most often associated with poverty, but it can also arise when people are isolated, insecure and defenseless in the face of risk, shock or stress.
  20. 20. Natural Hazards
  21. 21. - This are naturally occurring physical phenomena caused either by rapid or slow onset events which can be geophysical (earthquake, landslides, tsunamis and volcanic activity), hydrological (avalanches and floods), climatological (extreme temperatures, drought and wildfires), meteorological (cyclones and storms/wave surges) or biological (disease epidemics and insect/animal plagues). Natural Hazards
  22. 22. Technological or man-made Hazards
  23. 23. - This are events that are caused by humans and occur in or close to human settlements. This can include environmental degradation, pollution and accidents. Technological or man- made hazards (complex emergencies/conflicts, famine, displaced populations, industrial accidents and transport accidents) Technological or man-made Hazards
  24. 24. Disaster Management - It can be defined as the organization and management of resources and responsibilities for dealing with all humanitarian aspects of emergencies, in particular preparedness, response and recovery in order to lessen the impact of disasters. The first people to respond to a disaster are those living in the local community. They are the first to start rescue and relief operations. The Red Cross and Red Crescent National Societies therefore focus on community-based disaster preparedness, which assists communities to reduce their vulnerability to disasters and strengthen their capacities to resist them.
  25. 25. - Disaster preparedness refers to measures taken to prepare for and reduce the effects of disasters. That is, to predict and, where possible, prevent disasters, mitigate their impact on vulnerable populations, and respond to and effectively cope with their consequences. Preparing
  26. 26. - The primary aims of disaster response are rescue from immediate danger and stabilization of the physical and emotional condition of survivors. These go hand in hand with the recovery of the dead and the restoration of essential services such as water and power. How long this takes varies according to the scale, type and context of the disaster but typically takes between one and six months and is composed of a search and rescue phase in the immediate aftermath of a disaster followed by a medium-term phase devoted to stabilizing the survivors’ physical and emotional condition. Respondin g
  27. 27. - The social, economic and political consequences of disasters are frequently complex. For instance, the disaster may: • Disrupt vital community self-help networks, further increasing vulnerability. • Disrupt markets over a wide area, reducing the availability of food and opportunities for income generation. • Destroy essential health infrastructure such as hospitals, resulting in a lack of emergency and longer-term medical care for the affected population. Respondin g
  28. 28. Recovery - Recovery refers to those programs which go beyond the provision of immediate relief to assist those who have suffered the full impact of a disaster to rebuild their homes, lives and services and to strengthen their capacity to cope with future disasters.
  29. 29. Natural Hazard
  30. 30. Natural Hazard - A hazard is distinguished from an extreme event and a disaster. A natural hazard is an extreme event that occurs naturally and causes harm to humans – or to other things that we care about, though usually the focus is on humans (which, we might note, is anthropocentric). A natural hazard escalates into a natural disaster when an extreme event caused harm in significant amounts and overwhelms the capability of people to cope and respond.
  31. 31. Classification of Natural Hazards
  32. 32. Hazard Management
  33. 33. Emergency Preparedness Step 1: Know the risk - Every member of family or a group of people should be aware if there’s a incoming risk of calamity.
  34. 34. Step 2: Make a plan - Your family may not be together when an emergency occurs. Plan how to meet or how to contact one another, and discuss what you would do in different situations.
  35. 35. Step 3: Get an emergency kit
  36. 36. Disaster Prevention and Mitigation
  37. 37. Emergency Preparedness - The ultimate purpose of emergency management is to save lives, preserve the environment and protect property and the economy. Emergency management is comprised of four interdependent risk-based functions: prevention/ mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. Mitigation provides a critical foundation for emergency management. Disaster mitigation measures are those that eliminate or reduce the impacts and risk of hazards through proactive measures taken before an emergency or disaster occurs.
  38. 38. Mitigation • means to reduce the severity of the human and material damage caused by disaster. Prevention • is to ensure that the human action or natural phenomena do not result in disaster or emergency. Difference of Mitigation and Prevention
  39. 39. Land Use Planning - The process by which lands are evaluated and assessed to become a basis for decisions involving land disposition and utilization. This involves studies on the environmental effects of land use and its impact on the community.
  40. 40. • formerly known as the National Disaster Coordinating Council (NDCC), is working group of various government, non-government, civil sector and private sector organizations of the Government of the Republic Act 10121 of 2009. • The council is responsible for ensuring the protection and welfare of the people during disasters or emergencies. National Disaster Risk Reduction Management Council (NDRRMC)
  41. 41. National Disaster Risk Reduction Management Council (NDRRMC) • Serve as the President’s adviser on disaster preparedness programs, disaster operations and rehabilitation efforts undertaken by the government and the private sector. • Plans and leads the guiding activities when there is a disaster. • It is administered by the Office of the Civil Defense (OCD) under the Department of National Defense (DND).
  42. 42. Everyone is a key player in the disaster management. Remember, disasters start locally and end locally. We each have a part to play in preparing, responding and recovering. Key Players in Disaster Management
  43. 43. - Your local government has first-hand knowledge of your community’s social, economic, infrastructure, and environmental needs, helping them to provide support in a disaster. Role of Local Government in a Disaster (NDRRMC)
  44. 44. - The role of local government under the Disaster Management Act 2003 is to: • Have a disaster response capability • Approved a local disaster management plan • Ensure local disaster information is promptly given to the District Disaster Coordinator.
  45. 45. Local Management Groups Their role is to: • Develop, review and asses effective disaster management practices • Help local government to prepare a local disaster management plan. • Ensure the community knows how to respond in a disaster. • Identify and coordinate disaster resources . • Manage local disaster operations Ensure local disaster management and disaster operations
  46. 46. DIWAO!!

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