Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

The State Of Cyber Security & What We Might Do About It

444 views

Published on

Almost two weeks ago, at RSA Con 2016, Alex Dewedney, Director of Cyber Security at CESG admitted that we were losing the war against cybercrime despite throwing money at the problem.

Being a problem that’s too big for any one company or country to solve, entrepreneur, Jane Frankland looks at three emerging trends, the role of women in cyber security, and lays out a plan, showing how the cyber security community can work together to resolve the issue. It’s a big vision for cooperation, with a payoff that goes far beyond averting disaster. She asks: How can we use this crisis to spur better security for all?

Published in: Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

The State Of Cyber Security & What We Might Do About It

  1. 1. THE STATE OF CYBER SECURITY: AND WHAT WE MIGHT DO ABOUT IT Jane Frankland, hello@cybersecuritycapital.com Copyright CS^
  2. 2. Agenda • I’m going to talk about: • The state of the industry and 3 current emerging trends • The significance of women in relation to these • What changes we need to make so our industry becomes stronger • My objective is to: • Share some insights and stories so lessons may be learnt • Inspire and empower you • Get a commitment from you
  3. 3. Who am I? • Jane Frankland - entrepreneur, speaker, consultant and author • SC Magazine Awards Judge (Europe) • Board Advisor for ClubCISO • Cyber Security Woman of the Year 2016 (nominee) • Mum to 3 kids
  4. 4. We’re losing the cyber war • Alex Dewedney, Director of Cyber Security at CESG admits at RSA Con that we’re losing the war against cybercrime despite throwing money at the problem. • “We can point to lots of achievements around understanding the threats much better, about taking steps to mitigate those threats, addressing the national skills base and so on but, nationally, we are not winning the fight on cyber security,”
  5. 5. 3trends
  6. 6. 1. Cybercrime is increasing • Lloyd’s of London estimates that cyber attacks will cost businesses as much as $400B a year (includes direct damage plus post-attack disruption to the normal course of business). • Juniper research predicts that the rapid digitization of consumers’ lives and enterprise records will increase the cost of breaches to $2.1T globally by 2019. • The World Economic Forum says a significant portion of cybercrime goes undetected (e.g. industrial espionage where access to confidential documents and data is difficult to spot). • Panda Labs estimates that 40% of all computers in certain countries — including China, Ecuador and Turkey — are now infected with some type of malware.
  7. 7. 2. The skills gap is widening According to Cisco there 1M global cyber security job openings. Demand is expected to rise to 6M globally by 2019, with a projected shortfall of 1.5M.
  8. 8. 3. The way we work is changing
  9. 9. THE ROLE OF WOMEN HOW CAN WOMEN HELP TO IMPROVE THE CRISIS WE HAVE ON OUR HANDS?
  10. 10. Economics • McKinsey & Co. reported that full gender equality would add 26%, or $28T, to global gross domestic product by 2025. • Productive, innovative and able to stay on schedule and within budget, compared to homogenous teams. • When women are in leadership roles, there’s more diversity in the workforce, contributions to charities and support of local businesses. • When women are politically and economically empowered societies are more stable. Cyber Security • Women think differently to men. • We’re genetically programmed to be risk averse (due to our ability to give birth) and therefore seek security. • When men and women work together in cyber security we can do a better job of protecting our environments and thwarting attacks.
  11. 11. Women have played crucial roles in computing from the start • 1840s Ada Lovelace (the first programmer) created an algorithm that the first modern computer (the Analytical Engine) used. • 1940s - During WW II, women at Bletchley Park were instrumental in breaking code. • At this time too, women programmed the US Army's Electronic Numerical Integrator And Computer (ENIAC) - the first electronic general-purpose computer. • 1950s Grace Hopper came up with the first computer compiler and then established the programming language COBOL. Mary Keller helped develop BASIC and Radia Perlman built some of the protocols of the early Internet. Elsie Shutt founded one of the first US software businesses, Comp Inc, and Dina St Johnston founded the first British software company, VPS. • In the 1960s Dame Steve Shirley started a software company called Freelance Programmers.
  12. 12. In 1967, Cosmopolitan Magazine wrote an article called The Computer Girls, which proclaimed: “Now have come the big, dazzling computers – and a whole new kind of work for women: programming.”
  13. 13. All time highs: the 1980s • Women in computing were at an all time high of 38% and in security we were well and truly on a roll. We had women like Becky Bace, known informally as the ‘mother of computer security’ directing research in information security for the U.S. Department of Defence and teaching the first generations of cyber security professionals.
  14. 14. All time lows: today
  15. 15. 5 CHALLENGES TO ADDRESS IN ORDER TO IMPROVE THE NUMBERS OF WOMEN IN CYBER SECURITY & THE STATE OF OUR INDUSTRY
  16. 16. CHALLENGE ONE We need to get better at developing and attracting talent.
  17. 17. In schools • Despite technology forming such an integral aspect of our working lives, even in 2016 girls still don’t get as much opportunity to use computers in schools as boys. Ignorance, stereotypes and biased approaches still exist. • Raytheon and the National Cybersecurity Alliance surveyed the career interests and educational preparedness of millennials (ages 18 to 26) in 12 countries around the world, 62% of men and 75% of women said no secondary or high school computer classes offered the skills to help them pursue a career in cyber security. • STORY - ANJA
  18. 18. In universities Universities are not adequately preparing students for the cyber security workplace.
  19. 19. From elsewhere
  20. 20. CHALLENGE TWO We need to get better at marketing and communications.
  21. 21. Understand our buyers’ needs Candidates (diversity) Vendors/ Consultancies/ StartupsCISOs 3 STAKEHOLDERS
  22. 22. IBM: HackAHairDryer
  23. 23. CHALLENGE THREE We need to define the industry and showcase the variety of roles.
  24. 24. STORY - TOM
  25. 25. Resources
  26. 26. Community & knowledge share The Book The Conference
  27. 27. CHALLENGE FOUR We need to improve our recruitment processes.
  28. 28. Recruitmen t agencies Recruitment Agencies Human Resources Competance versus Confidence
  29. 29. CHALLENGE FIVE We need to offer workplace flexibility and recalibrate culture.
  30. 30. Gen Ys (1981-95) will make up 50% of the workforce in 4 years & 75% in 9 years and they’re the largest generation (75M) after the Baby Boomers (80M).
  31. 31. WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?
  32. 32. VISIT CS^ http://cybersecuritycapital.com

×