Practical and emotional issues in          co-researching          Dorothy Atkinson           Plymouth 2013         The Op...
Getting close to peopleBuilding rapport means getting close to people by: Being friendly and informal Creating a relaxed...
Dangers in getting closeCloseness in research has the potential to: Exploit people Make them dependent Raise expectatio...
Saying goodbye  The project, initially seen (by me) as lasting a few weeks, in fact  lasted almost two years. The acute wo...
Ethical and emotional checklist Exploitation Dependency Expectations of friendship Perceptions of the researcher as su...
Co-researchers
St Lawrence’s Hospital
Emotions in research Life’s journey – from darkness into light Past and present emotions Using emotion to bring about c...
Issues for practiceInterviewer/researcher needs to: Be sympathetic, supportive and accepting Stay with the emotion Take...
Dorothy Atkinson:Practical and emotional issues in co researching
Dorothy Atkinson:Practical and emotional issues in co researching
Dorothy Atkinson:Practical and emotional issues in co researching
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Dorothy Atkinson:Practical and emotional issues in co researching

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Presentation by Dorothy Atkinson at first ESRC funded seminar on participatory research, hosted by Jane Seale and colleagues at Plymouth University, Jan 10th, 2013

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Dorothy Atkinson:Practical and emotional issues in co researching

  1. 1. Practical and emotional issues in co-researching Dorothy Atkinson Plymouth 2013 The Open University
  2. 2. Getting close to peopleBuilding rapport means getting close to people by: Being friendly and informal Creating a relaxed atmosphere Using a conversational approach Doing things together
  3. 3. Dangers in getting closeCloseness in research has the potential to: Exploit people Make them dependent Raise expectations of friendship Encourage people to see the researchers as a supporter/helper Delve into sensitive areas Leave people feeling rejected/sad when it’s over
  4. 4. Saying goodbye The project, initially seen (by me) as lasting a few weeks, in fact lasted almost two years. The acute worry I confided in my diary at the outset (‘How can I retain their interest?’) soon became, and remained, a more chronic anxiety (‘How will it ever end?’). The group, it seemed, had a life and momentum of its own, in spite of my efforts to impose boundaries on its work and limit its lifespan. I brought the group to an end. It was a ‘happy ending’ for me (and probably for staff members who were involved in organising transport) but not necessarily for anyone else. In a real sense, then, this could be seen as an unhappy ending, with the termination of the group’s life and the subsequent loss of friendships.
  5. 5. Ethical and emotional checklist Exploitation Dependency Expectations of friendship Perceptions of the researcher as supporter/helper Sensitive areas Rejection and/or sadness
  6. 6. Co-researchers
  7. 7. St Lawrence’s Hospital
  8. 8. Emotions in research Life’s journey – from darkness into light Past and present emotions Using emotion to bring about change Finding the right words Gaps and silences Taking time to talk
  9. 9. Issues for practiceInterviewer/researcher needs to: Be sympathetic, supportive and accepting Stay with the emotion Take plenty of time

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