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Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !1
Scent Sells
Jamie Huggins
IMC 612 — Week 9
Final Paper
Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !2
Table of Contents
Purpose……………………………………………………………………….3
Scent’s Effect on Consu...
Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !3
Purpose
Something as simple as the smell of a cup of coffee can have a huge im...
Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !4
laboratory and retail environments and measured the scents’ effect on the part...
Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !5
Infusion of Scent into the Consumer Shopping Experience
Scent marketing appear...
Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !6
upscale well-being,’ and jasmine and tonka, ‘to create a relaxing atmosphere…’...
Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !7
Scent utilization helps create desires for specific products. For example, Cin...
Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !8
consumers are able to recognize and process simple scents easier. This often u...
Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !9
References
Bradford, K. & Desrochers, D. (2009). The Use of Scents to Influenc...
Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !10
Photo + Fragrance of Chocolate Cake = More Chocolate Cakes Sold. (2014, Febru...
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IMC 612 Final Paper

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This is my final project for IMC 612
Grade: A+

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IMC 612 Final Paper

  1. 1. Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !1 Scent Sells Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Week 9 Final Paper
  2. 2. Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !2 Table of Contents Purpose……………………………………………………………………….3 Scent’s Effect on Consumer Behavior………………..………………………3 Infusion of Scent into the Consumer Shopping Experience………………….5 Benefits of Scent Marketing………………………………………………….6
  3. 3. Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !3 Purpose Something as simple as the smell of a cup of coffee can have a huge impact on the human brain. Studies have shown that the scent of coffee reminds people of their mothers’ cooking breakfast, and thus, brings back memories of home. A few years ago, Folger’s coffee took this information and turned into a very successful commercial, which showed a military man returning home and opening a Folger’s coffee packet. When his mother smelled the coffee, she immediately knew he was home (Solomon, 2013, p.53). This Folger’s commercial helps show the immense power of scent marketing, which is an often untapped resource in the area of sensory marketing. Odors have the power to evict emotions, create feelings, or even bring back memories. Because of this, businesses, like Folger’s, are beginning to explore these scent connections and turn them into marketing opportunities. This paper will review scent’s effect on consumer behavior and explore the benefits that scent marketing can offer to businesses. Scent’s Effect on Consumer Behavior In sensory marketing, companies pay specific attention to the impact of sensations on consumer experiences. Senses like sight, taste, touch, and in this case, smell, have a strong impact on consumer behavior by enhancing attitudes, perceptions, or overall satisfaction among consumers (Solomon, 2013, p.49). Throughout the course of many research studies, the existence of this scent connection has been proven repeatedly. For example, in one such study, researchers Madzharov, Block, and Morrin, stated that scents are surprisingly very subtle and powerful influencers. They claimed that certain scent temperatures have an impact on consumer behavior and can even cause consumers to spend more money. In the tests for this study, they exposed their participants to warm and cool scents in both
  4. 4. Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !4 laboratory and retail environments and measured the scents’ effect on the participants after their exposure. After their studies were complete, the researchers found that ambient scents that differ in temperature (i.e. warm or cool) do have a direct effect on consumer behavior. Their studies proved that warm-scented environments create perceptions of higher social density, power preferences, purchasing of prestige products, and higher dollar spendings (Madzharov, Block, & Morrin, 2015, p. 83-93). In another scent study, researchers Krashna, Morrin, and Sayin sought to discover if real or imagined food smells increased salivation levels and desires for food products. In the tests for this study, participants were shown food images and written cues. They were later asked to smell or even imagine scents representing those images. The researchers’ tests measured their salivation levels and consumption behaviors. Interestingly enough, the results of this study were as they predicted: smelling a food scent increased salivation levels and consumption desires for all of the participants (Krishna, Morrin, & Sayin, 2013, p. 18-25). These studies both make strong contributions to research in sensory marketing, and specifically, the area of scent marketing. The first study based on ambient scent temperatures showed that warm scents play a powerful role in consumer behavior. The results showed that something as simple as a warm scent can cause consumers to spend more money and purchase more expensive products. This information is invaluable to marketers — especially to those in retail. The second study based on olfactory imagery showed that actual scents and images in food ads enhance consumer responses. The results proved that merely asking subjects to imagine an odor will not increase salivation levels. They must see an actual picture of food in order for the increase to occur (Photo + Fragrance, 2014).
  5. 5. Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !5 Infusion of Scent into the Consumer Shopping Experience Scent marketing appears to be one of the fastest growing areas of sensory marketing. “Ad companies spend about $80 million per year on scent marketing; the Scent Marketing Institute estimates that number will reach more than $500 million by 2016” (Solomon, 2013, p. 53). Though the roots of scent marketing lie in odor control (i.e. a smoky smelling casino), this concept has taken a much broader approach in recent years. Retail stores, hospitality organizations, and even automotive dealerships have all taken a strong interest in the area of scent marketing to better help define their brands (Smiley, 2014). One company well-known for its scent marketing efforts is Abercrombie & Fitch. Over a decade ago, Abercrombie & Fitch was actually one of the first brands to make scent apart of its identity. Employees would manually spray Fierce, the brand’s most popular cologne scent, throughout Abercrombie’s stores. This method was far from ideal, however. “It was expensive; employees were doused in the scent, and there wasn't a uniform effect” (Smiley, 2014). It was not until several years ago that the retailer began working with AirQ to better help deploy and disperse the scent throughout its stores. AirQ installed delivery systems inside the stores located on the ceilings that were powered by track lighting (Smiley, 2014). Today, Abercrombie and Fitch’s signature store scent has become an integral part of its consumers’ shopping experience. Ford Motor Company’s Lincoln sub-brand has also experimented with scent marketing in its showrooms. The company created its own Essence of Lincoln fragrance that is available nationwide on scent cards. The scent is also dispersed through ventilation systems in select Lincoln showrooms across the United States. According to a company press release, “the fragrance ‘exudes luxury and warmth,’ including scents like green tea, ‘to encourage a sense of
  6. 6. Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !6 upscale well-being,’ and jasmine and tonka, ‘to create a relaxing atmosphere…’” (Smiley, 2014). Similar to Abercrombie & Fitch, Lincoln’s subtle scent infusion allows its customers to make an emotional connection to the store and the brand itself. Marketers can infuse scents to influence their customers in the following ways: as a marketer scent, product scent, or an ambient scent. Marketer scents are used as promotional tactics, and these types of scents are used to attract consumers to specific products or services. An example of a marketer scent would be the new car smell found often at automotive dealerships (Bradford & Desrochers, 2009, p. 143). Product scents are exactly what they sound like — product scents are the actual products themselves. Examples of product scents include: air fresheners, perfumes, colognes, candles, and scent machines. Ambient scents are scents that do not come from a specific product. They are classified as general odors which are apart of their respective retail environments (Bradford & Desrochers, 2009, p. 143). Examples of ambient scents can be found in the Abercrombie & Fitch and Lincoln examples mentioned previously. Benefits of Scent Marketing Research shows that scent marketing may be one of the most important aspects of sensory marketing as a whole. Studies show that 1% of people remember what they touch, 2% remember what they hear, 5% remember what they see, 15% remember what they taste, and 35% remember what they smell (Why and How Scent Marketing Works, 2015). Interestingly enough, this research suggests that scent dictates the strongest human reaction to the surrounding environment, thus directly effecting human behavior. This gives marketers a big opportunity to take advantage of this scent reaction.
  7. 7. Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !7 Scent utilization helps create desires for specific products. For example, Cinnabon places ovens near the entrances of its stores so that the smell of fresh baked cinnamon rolls is emitted every time their oven doors are opened. Their cinnamon rolls are baked every 30 minutes, and some store bakers are told to heat additional trays of brown sugar and cinnamon to keep the scent fresh in the air. “Cinnabon stores are intentionally located in malls or airports, not outside, so smells can linger” (Nassauer, 2014). This aroma infusion has become a huge aspect of the company’s marketing strategy, as they have found that putting ovens in the back of stores significantly lowers their sales (Nassauer, 2014). Scent utilization also encourages consumers to spend more time in a specific environment. The right type of scent has the power to enhance the visit for a store’s customers, and thus, make them want to spend more time in that specific setting. Retailers use scents to evoke certain emotional responses from their consumers — like happiness and relaxation. These emotions help create a more pleasant consumer shopping experience. Lavender is often used to subtly slow down heartbeat rates, and thus, make consumers’ perceptions of time slow also down. In turn, consumers end up spending more time in the store, which increases their odds of spending more money (Fahmy, 2010). Finally, scent utilization can encourage consumers to spend more money. Eric Spangenberg, dean of Washington State University College of Business, recently stated that simple scents are the most effective scents to increase consumer spending. During his own academic research, he found that when he exposed shoppers to both complex and simple scents, the simple scent resulted in a significant bump in sales (Walford, 2012). Spangenberg stated that
  8. 8. Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !8 consumers are able to recognize and process simple scents easier. This often unconscious recognition results in them spending more money. In conclusion, scents have a powerful effect on consumer behavior, and if used correctly, can offer many benefits to businesses and marketers alike. Researchers Madzharov, Block, and Morrin found that the inclusion of a warm ambient scent has the power to make consumers purchase more prestige products and more products overall. Researchers Krashna, Morrin, and Sayin found that something as simple as smelling a food scent can increase salivation levels. This increases the desire for food products and increases overall consumption levels. Marketers are taking note of these studies, and businesses are implementing these results into their retail environments. Abercrombie & Fitch and Ford Motor Company both infuse ambient scents into their stores to allow their customers to make an emotional connection the brands themselves. Cinnabon positions their ovens near their doors to increase the public’s desire for their cinnamon rolls. Retailers often emit scents like lavender into their stores to encourage their customers to stay longer and even spend more money. As marketers look towards the future of scent marketing, they can only expect this emerging and profitable field to gain more exposure and popularity as other industries attempt their own types of sensory infusion. 

  9. 9. Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !9 References Bradford, K. & Desrochers, D. (2009). The Use of Scents to Influence Consumers: The Sense of Using Scents to Make Cents. 90(2), 141-153. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from http:// www.jstor.org.www.libproxy.wvu.edu/stable/40665290?pq- origsite=summon&seq=5#page_scan_tab_contents Fahmy, D. (2012, July 1). Smells Like Profit: Scents in Stores, on Products, Makes Shoppers Buy More. ABC News. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from http://abcnews.go.com/Business/ smells-profit-scents-stores-products-makes-shoppers-buy/story?id=11053555 Krashna, A., Morrin, M., & Sayin, E. (2013, December ). Smellizing Cookies and Salivating: A Focus on Olfactory Imagery. 41(1), 18-25. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from http:// web.a.ebscohost.com.www.libproxy.wvu.edu/ehost/detail/detail sid=16733a37-2ab8-491c-84a2-f22bab38fb3c %40sessionmgr4001&vid=0&hid=4206&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d %3d#db=bah&AN=96081062 Madzharov, A., Block, L., & Morrin, M. (2015, January). The Cool Scent of Power: Effects of Ambient Scent on Consumer Preferences and Choice Behavior. 79(1), 83-93. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from http://journals.ama.org.www.libproxy.wvu.edu/doi/abs/10.1509/jm. 13.0263 Nassaur, S. (2014, May 20). Using Scent as a Marketing Tool, Stores Hope It — and Shoppers — Will Linger. WSJ. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from http://www.wsj.com/ articles/SB10001424052702303468704579573953132979382
  10. 10. Jamie Huggins IMC 612 — Wk 9 Final Paper !10 Photo + Fragrance of Chocolate Cake = More Chocolate Cakes Sold. (2014, February 11). Journals Division. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from http://www.jcr-admin.org/files/ pressreleases/021414154503_KrishnaRelease.pdf Smily, M. (2014, December 9). Dollars & Scents: From Clothes to Cars to Banks, Brands Seek Distinction Through Fragrance. AdAge. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from http://adage.com/ article/cmo-strategy/smell-money-marketers-sell-scent/296084/ Solomon, M. (2013). Consumer Behavior: Buying, Having and Being. (10th ed., pp. 49-53). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. Walford, C. (2012, November 27). Scent-imental Value: How Shoppers are Encouraged to Spend by Simple Smells That They Instantly Recognize. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from http:// www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2239149/Scent-imental-value-How-shoppers- encouraged-spend-simple-smells-instantly-recognise.html#ixzz3aWupvnMv Why and How Scent Marketing Works. (2015). Scent Marketing USA. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from http://www.scentmarketingusa.com/scent-marketing-works.html

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