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Macbeth Thematic Unit Lesson Plans

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Macbeth Thematic Unit Lesson Plans

  1. 1. Jamie Delaney ED 623 June 12, 2009 Macbeth Lesson Plan Cross Curricular Day 1 Context: This lesson was written for a twelfth grade general integrated language arts class in a suburban school district with 20 to 30 students per class. Broad, Lifelong Goal/s & Rationale: The students will be learning how to collaborate with one another and work together as a team to come up with ideas. This will help them in college and their career in the working world. The students will also be learning about past events (how life was) and will be thinking about how things have changed since then. They will be learning from the past and throughout the course of this unit, learning from the mistakes of Macbeth. Specific Daily Objectives: The students will define ambition and power to determine different and similar characteristics. The students will list facts and what they know about the 16th century and Macbeth. The students will research the time period of Shakespeare and Macbeth to better understand the play. ODE and/or NCTE Standards: Reading App. Lit. Text 1, 2, 5, 7, 8 Materials: The students will need paper and a writing utensil for this activity. Methods: Anticipation: (5 minutes) The students will first be asked to define power. Then they will define ambition. The class will discuss what they have written and the similarities and differences between their definitions. Introduction/Overview: (10 minutes) Introduce the play, how ambition and power play a part in the play, and introduce the background of Shakespeare and the 16th century time period. Guided Practice or Modeling: (15 minutes) Group the students into pairs and have them write down everything they know about the 16th century (clothes, buildings, way of life, etc.) and Shakespeare. Then, make a KWL chart on the board of the student’s knowledge and what they want to learn about the time period and Macbeth. Application: (20 minutes) The students will get into groups and go to a computer and find ten facts about Duncan, Macbeth, and Scotland at the time the play was written. If time permits, we will share our findings as a class.
  2. 2. Adaptations: The students will be working in groups and should have no problems coming up with ideas concerning the 16th century or finding information about the time period. Also, for each English 12 class, there are also several teachers in the classroom at all times to help students with any questions they might have about the research or Shakespeare. Possible Problems & Solutions: One possible problem might be that some students do not feel comfortable working in groups. These activities in this lesson can be completed by an individual as easy as those in a group. So if students would rather work alone, they can be permitted to do so. Another problem that might arise would be students not researching on the computer. In order to reduce the number of students who are not working, I only offer the student so much time to finish the assignment. Once everyone begins talking, I assume everyone is finished and the assignment is to be turned in. Assessment and/or Outcomes: The students will be assessed by their participation in their group and by their findings in the research portion of the lesson. The students will also be assessed by their previous knowledge of Shakespeare and both his time period and that of Macbeth. After researching, the students will read Act I Scenes 1-3 for homework for the next day.
  3. 3. Macbeth Lesson Plan Day 2 Context: This lesson was written for a twelfth grade general integrated language arts class in a suburban school district with 20 to 30 students per class. Broad, Lifelong Goal/s & Rationale: The character maps will help students to dissect characters in a story, thus helping them locate other literary devices and helping them to predict the futures of the characters in the story. Dissecting these characters will also help them to think critically when they read other Shakespeare plays or other novels. Specific Daily Objectives: The students will identify key vocabulary in Act I and keep it in a vocabulary journal. The students will form literature circles and discuss the previous reading. The students will begin character maps for three people in the play of Macbeth. ODE and/or NCTE Standards: Acquisition of Voc. 1, Reading Process 1, 2 Reading App. Lit. text 1, 8 Materials: The students will need character maps, a writing utensil, paper, and their textbook for this activity. Methods: Anticipation: (5-8 minutes) The students will be introduced to literature circles. When the students enter the room, the desks will be arranged into groups of four or five. Introduction/Overview: (5 minutes) Before the students start discussing the text, have each student write down three to five questions they had about what they read or what they would like to talk about with their group. Guided Practice or Modeling: (15 minutes) The students will then begin discussing the first three scenes of Act I. They will ask the questions they have just written and fully discuss other group members’ questions or comments during this time. Application: (20 minutes) The students will be given instructions on how to complete their character maps (due when the class has finished reading the entire play). They will then, individually, spend the remainder of class time filling in what they know about Macbeth and two other characters of their choosing. If the students finish early they may read the remainder of Act I silently or with other members of their group. Adaptations: Shakespeare can be difficult for young students read and get into since they usually do not understand everything that is occurring within the play. So, before
  4. 4. each discussion we can quickly summarize what happened in the acts read so they feel more comfortable talking about what is occurring in their group. The students are also working together to work out what is going on in the play and to figure out future events. This also gives them an advantage to figuring out the inner workings of the play. Possible Problems & Solutions: Since the previous reading was an assignment to be done for homework, there may be a significant amount of students who did not do the reading and will not be able to participate in the literature circle because they do not know what is going on in the story. One possible solution, if there are many who did not read, would be to give the students a warning and have them read the first Act together as a group and create questions for homework. The students would then discuss the entire Act the following day in their literature circle. For the student/s who finishes their work early, there is always something else for them to do, like reading the next night’s reading and creating discussion questions for the next literature circle. The questions made by the students can also be turned in for points. Assessment and/or Outcomes: The students will be assessed by their participation in the literature circle and by their discussion questions/topics. They can also turn their discussion questions in and receive a participation grade for both their input while in the circle and their written work. The students will also be assessed throughout the entire unit by their character maps. They will gather ideas from each of their group discussions about their characters and formulate their own idea about Shakespeare’s characters.
  5. 5. Macbeth Lesson Plan Day 3 Context: This lesson was written for a twelfth grade general integrated language arts class in a suburban school district with 20 to 30 students per class. Broad, Lifelong Goals/Rational: The students will be learning how to read Shakespeare and make their own judgments about his characters, a skill that will help them with other novels and short stories they will read in college. This will also help them to be a better judge of character in the outside world (not just believing what others think of someone, but observing them and talking to them themselves). The students are also practicing writing their opinions, another skill that will be useful in college. Specific Daily Objectives: The students will read and learn how to get meaning out of Shakespearean language so they are able to discuss the text among each other. The students will learn how to assess Shakespeare’s characters based on the attributes they see, what other characters in the story think, and how the character himself thinks and acts. With this concrete information, the students can make better judgments about the characters and the decisions they make in the story. The students will also gather information from today’s reading to practice putting their interpretation of the story on paper. The students will look up Act II vocabulary to prepare them for the next day’s reading. ODE and/or NCTE Standards: Acquisition of Voc. 1, Reading Process 1, 2, Reading App. Lit. text 3, 5, 8, Writing App. 2b Materials: The students will need their text book, character maps, paper, and pencil. Methods: Anticipation: (3-5 minutes) Ask the students if they have ever been influenced by another to make a bad choice. What and who has the power to influence them? Is it similar to the way Macbeth is being influenced by others to make his bad decisions? Introduction/Overview: (5-10 minutes) After reading Act I scenes 4-7 of Macbeth, discuss what happened in the scene we just read. The students will discuss Macbeth’s current situation and offer some advice about how he should handle his situation. Then, they will make predictions on what path Macbeth will end up choosing and where his choices will lead him. Guided Practice or Modeling: (20-25 minutes) Using the information they have received about influence and the choices Macbeth is making, the students will choose to write about one of the two prompts they are given. Prompt #1: Write a letter from Macbeth to Lady Macbeth describing the Weird Sister’s prophecy. (At least 12 sentences) Prompt #2: Describe Macbeth’s character traits in Act I (At least 3 traits). How have these traits changed throughout the course of the Act? Use references/key
  6. 6. quotations from the text to support your answer. The writing will be turned in at the end of the period. The students will then work on Act II vocabulary, if time permits. Application: The students will use the writing prompts they are working on to develop a better sense of the main character, Macbeth. This will help them to develop their character chart which will track Macbeth’s character traits throughout the play. Both prompts give the students a chance to explore how Macbeth has already changed in only the first act of the play. Adaptations: There are several adaptations that can be made to this lesson to aid a variety of learners. There can be more time allotted to students who need it for the writing portion of the assignment. The students already have several prompts to choose from, both of them are based on the text read that day in class. Also, for each English 12 class, there are several teachers in the classroom at all times to help students with any questions they may have. For those who are having trouble connecting with or understanding the text, a copy of side-by-side Shakespeare can be copied off for them in order to aid them with the assignment. Possible Problems & Solutions: Most students are apprehensive when it comes to reading and understanding Shakespeare. If the class is unresponsive when discussing what they just read out loud in class, they can be split up into small groups and given a small section of what they read to translate for the class into modern English. Or since not everyone in the class has a part to read, those students can be given a part to translate to everyone after the reading for the day has finished. This will keep those students concentrated on the reading, instead of working on something else or distracting other students from understanding the text. Assessment and/or Outcomes: The students will be assessed by how well they can talk about the day’s reading and what they predict for Macbeth. They will also be assessed for their writing, which will be graded on a 20 point rubric. Based on how well they can answer the prompts that they are given will depict how well they understand what is happening in the play. Since writing usually takes up most of the class time for students, they will be finishing their Act II vocabulary words for homework that will be due at the beginning of the period the following day.
  7. 7. Macbeth Lesson Plan Day 4 Context: This lesson was written for a twelfth grade general integrated language arts class in a suburban school district with 20 to 30 students per class. Broad, Lifelong Goal/s & Rationale: Learning the theme of a story teaches the reader a life lesson. By learning how to find the central idea of a story by themselves, students can learn from everything they read. This will help them with future readings in both high school and in college, as well as in leisure readings. Specific Daily Objectives: The students will practice and learn how to locate theme within a story. The students will continue learning about the characters in Macbeth and add what they have learned to their character maps. The students will learn to make connections between Macbeth and other forms of literature. ODE and/or NCTE Standards: Read App. 1, 6, 8, Writing App. 1b, Comm, oral, visual 8a, b, c, e Materials: The students will need their text book, character maps, paper, and a pencil. Methods: Anticipation: (5-8 minutes) Since most students complain that they don’t understand what is happening in the play when we read it and sometimes even after we go over it, moving on to discuss themes in the play can be difficult. So instead of having them search for the point of a story with something they don’t completely get, they will watch a clip (from The Emperor’s New Groove) that contains the same main theme as Macbeth. Introduction/Overview: (5-10 minutes) After the clip, introduce theme (the central point or main idea of a story). Mention difference between theme and moral. Guided Practice or Modeling: (15-20 minutes) Explain that since fairy tales and Disney stories is something that most young people grew up on, it is something they are familiar with, can discuss together, and is something simple where they can practice finding theme. The students will then get into their groups of two and generate a list of characteristics for the character poster given to their group, much like their character maps, for Lady Macbeth, Macbeth, Isma, and Kronk. Then, together as a class, the students will share what they have come up with and we will create thematic statements. Application: (10 minutes) Then, the students will choose five characteristics on their posters that they think best describe their character. Using those five characteristics, they will create a thematic statement or idea of the play/movie. Then,
  8. 8. as a class, we will share what they have come up with and compare the two sets of characters and central themes. Adaptations: There are several adaptations that can be made to this lesson to aid a variety of learners. There can be more time allotted to students who need it for adding character traits to their list and can add on to their list as we discuss the characters as a class. Also, for each English 12 class, there are several teachers in the classroom at all times to help students with any questions they may have. For those who are having trouble thinking of abstract ideas, more examples can be given in class. The students can also be given a worksheet of sample themes from popular stories so the students can see examples of ideas and themes. Possible Problems & Solutions: A possible problem students may have with this exercise is creating one word adjectives that match the characters they are assessing. The students can be permitted to use a thesaurus to help them or they can be allowed to use a short two or three word statement to get their point across if they cannot think of a specific adjective. The students may also encounter difficulties when going through the example with the tortoise and the hare. This is to be expected and the students will be guided and lead to abstract ideas and thematic statements. Assessment and/or Outcomes: The students will be assessed by their participation with their group members (making the list of traits for characters) and their class participation. If the students have problems making the transition from key character traits to theme ideas (abstract ideas) or from ideas to thematic sentences, the students can be given a well known fictional story to dissect for homework. For example, The Lion King contains several themes similar to the themes in Macbeth. The students can compare several characters from each story together and try to come up with similar abstract ideas and a possible theme.
  9. 9. Macbeth Lesson Plan Day 5 Context: This lesson was written for a twelfth grade general integrated language arts class in a suburban school district with 20 to 30 students per class. Broad, Lifelong Goal/s & Rationale: Symbols are everywhere. They are in literature, the media, and many places in a student’s everyday life. This lesson will help them recognize symbols in future readings and in other objects they see in everyday life. Writing App. 1a, b, c, d, 2a, b Materials: The students will need paper and a writing utensil for this activity. Methods: Anticipation: (5 minutes) Show the students visuals of symbols that they see almost every day and ask them there meaning. Introduction/Overview: (5 minutes) Inform the students of what a symbol is and it’s importance in a story. Guided Practice or Modeling: (10 minutes) The students will make a chart listing all the things that depict Macbeth’s lust for power, ambition, and lack of morality. Application: (10-15 minutes) The students will create a poem based on the symbolism chart that they have created about Macbeth. The poem will have seven lines and instructions for each line will be written on the board. The idea for this poem was found at www.readwritethink.org. Adaptations: If students are having trouble coming up with ideas or writing the poem, they can easily be put into groups to prevent them spending the remainder of the class period on a seven line poem. Also, if needed, there are also several teachers circulating the classroom to assist the students with any troubles they may have with the writing or coming up with symbols. Possible Problems & Solutions: If the students have problems coming up with symbols from the story, we can make a list of symbols on the front board as a class. Then I can pair the students up into groups and give each of them a symbol from the board to prevent multiple groups from doing the same symbol. Specific Daily Objectives: Students will compare a real life experience of guilt with that of Macbeth’s. Students will examine language and identify examples of symbolism. ODE and/or NCTE Standards: Reading App. Lit 8, Writing Process 1, 3, 5, 6, 9
  10. 10. Assessment and/or Outcomes: The students will be assessed by the poem they produce in class and the ideas for symbols they created. If put into groups, the students will be assessed by the teachers circulating the room who will be giving out participation points. If a student finishes early, they may be permitted to work on their homework, reading Act III scenes 1-3.
  11. 11. Macbeth Lesson Plan Day 6 Context: This lesson was written for a twelfth grade general integrated language arts class in a suburban school district with 20 to 30 students per class. Broad, Lifelong Goal/s & Rationale: Students will learn to write clearly and concisely, which will help them later in college. The students will also learn how to recognize the most important piece of information in a text. ODE and/or NCTE Standards: Acquisition of Vocab. 1, 5 Writing App. 3 Materials: The students will need paper, a writing utensil, and textbooks for this activity. Methods: Anticipation: (5 minutes) Show students newspaper headlines and opening segments of articles. Focus on figurative language. Introduction/Overview: (10 minutes) Inform students about the break down of newspaper articles (Title, date, lead, introduction, body, closing). Show examples of these and/or write a lead as a class. Guided Practice or Modeling: (5-10 minutes) The students will write the who, what, where, when, and why concerning Duncan’s death on a blank sheet of paper. Application: (10-20 minutes) The students will, under the answers to the five questions, write a newspaper article using that information about Duncan’s death. While writing the article, the students should keep the theme of ambition in mind and include key passages/quotes. The students also need to create a name for their newspaper and a title for their article. Adaptations: There are several adaptations that can be made to this lesson to aid a variety of learners. There can be more time allotted to students who need it to complete their writing. If the students are having trouble coming up with the answers to the five questions, they can be permitted to consult their literature circle members for help. There are also several teachers in the classroom at all times to help students with any problems or questions they might have. Possible Problems & Solutions: One problem that may arise during this assignment is that students do not fully understand what happened in the acts where Duncan was killed. Specific Daily Objectives: Students will write newspaper articles portraying the theme ambition without moral constraints. Students will identify vocabulary in context.
  12. 12. These students may consult with the members of their literature circle to discuss what happened. Assessment and/or Outcomes: The students will be assessed on their writing with a rubric. Based on how well they can answer the prompt that they are given will depict how well they understand what is happening in the play. Since writing usually takes up most of the class time for students, they will be finishing their Act IV vocabulary words and reading Act IV scenes 1-3 if they have time at the end of class or for homework that will be due at the beginning of the period the following day.
  13. 13. Macbeth Lesson Plan Day 7 Context: This lesson was written for a twelfth grade general integrated language arts class in a suburban school district with 20 to 30 students per class. Broad, Lifelong Goal/s & Rationale: The students will be examining how people act in desperate situations. Examining these situations and finding rational solutions will help them in their own lives with these types of situations. They will learn to think before they make rash choices in their lives. ODE and/or NCTE Standards: Writing App. 1a, d, Reading Process 1 Materials: The students will need a large sheet of Butcher Block paper, colored markers, and their textbook for this activity. Methods: Anticipation: (5-10 minutes) After discussing the play up to this point, ask the students what they think motivates a person to act desperately. If the class struggles with this task, ask them to think of a time when they performed a desperate act. Introduction/Overview: (10 minutes) Have students volunteer examples to put on the board. Describe/give examples of the events and ask other students how they would have acted in the situation. Guided Practice or Modeling: (10-15 minutes) Each group will be given an act, up to Act IV, and will find specific examples of Macbeth’s reckless ambitiousness. The groups will be required to find at least three examples within their act. Application: (10-15 minutes) Each group will write their significant events on their portion of the timeline poster board. Adaptations: The students will be in groups in order to help them with the content material in the act they have been given. Together, they should be able to locate at least three examples of Macbeth’s lust for power/over ambition. If there are any questions, there will several teachers circulating the classroom checking in and helping groups stay on task. Specific Daily Objectives: Students will develop a timeline of events for Acts 1-4 emphasizing the events that depict character’s ambition to gain power. Students will respond to literature.
  14. 14. Possible Problems & Solutions: Some students may not have read a particular section or their entire given act for the timeline. These students will be permitted to use their textbook for help and will have the assistance of their group members to help them look for information. To prevent one student from doing all of the work for the group, the circulating teachers in the room will take participation grades for the activity to ensure that everyone who wants points participates. Assessment and/or Outcomes: The students will be assessed by their participation with their group members and by their understanding of the text, which will be apparent by the information they have included on their portion of the poster board timeline. If students have extra time at the end of the period, they can begin reading their homework, the next act of the play either silently or with their group members.
  15. 15. Macbeth Lesson Plan Media Literacy Day 8-9 Context: This lesson is written for grade 12 general English classrooms. The lesson plan is for a rural school district with 20 to 30 students per class. Broad, Lifelong Goal/s & Rationale: Why is this topic, strategy, or skill important? This lesson continues to follow the theme of the Macbeth unit: Ambition without morality leads to self-destruction. The students will see how to compile their own media literacy project while learning that Macbeth’s situation can not only be found in fictional stories, but in history as well. Tragic flaws are present in other literary works and exist in people in the real world (history). Specific Daily Objectives: The students will learn that what happened to Macbeth is not something that only happens in fictional stories. Situations like his appear in other literary works and also in the real world. In an example presentation, the students will learn about President Nixon’s situation and Scar from The Lion King and how they compare to Macbeth’s situation. They will also learn how to complete their media literacy presentation. ODE and/or NCTE Standards: Reading Process: Concepts of Print, Comprehension Strategies and Self-Monitoring Strategies-1, Reading Applications: Literary Text-1, 2, 5, 7, Communication: Oral and Visual- 8 a, c, d, e, 9 Materials: For this lesson, the plan requires that the students be in a computer lab. Methods: Anticipation: (2-3 minutes) Open lesson with a posing question "What do Richard Nixon, Scar from the Lion King, and Macbeth have in common?" Allow time for students to think and respond to this question. Lead students to draw inferences that bring out the central theme being studied "Blind ambition without morality leads to demise or self destruction." Ask students to brainstorm other historic or fictional characters that they think display the same characteristics as Macbeth and ultimately destroyed themselves. Introduction Overview: (5-7 minutes) Present to the class a power point that models what their assignment will be. The model power point presentation will show video clips of Richard Nixon and Scar and show comparisons to Macbeth. The power point presentation assignment will encompass two class periods in the school’s computer lab. The students work will demonstrate the use of research and brainstorming to create a visual media presentation that communicates a comparison of Macbeth with a historical figure or fictional character from literature or film. The visual media presentation will clearly demonstrate in a creative format comparison between Macbeth and the chosen character as well as demonstrate the central theme of Macbeth being studied. The expectations
  16. 16. include: work with a partner and brainstorm and research in the computer lab to create a visual media presentation using your research, technology, and creativity. The presentation is expected to be no less than one minute in length and no longer than four minutes long. Guided Practice or Modeling: The objectives for this lesson are to apply knowledge learned in the unit and use information from the unit along with previous knowledge to analyze and compare characters, create and compose a media presentation and support their position with evidence communicated in the presentation. The students will be paired with another student making sure that each group has adequate skills in technology to perform the given task. The students will be given two class periods to work in the computer lab. The students will brainstorm ideas and perform research via the internet. As a group they will work together to create a media presentation displaying a comparison between Macbeth and another character. The teacher will be available to guide students with technology and research as well as keep students on task while working together. The students’ final project will be shared with the class. Application: This project can be applied in a variety of aspects of the student’s learning. The lesson gives students the opportunity to take a central theme from literature and apply it to real life experiences and other stories that are familiar to them. Even though the students may not remember much about Nixon from history class, the video and comparison to The Lion King (something they are familiar with) should help them gain an understanding of the project. They gain from this lesson that human nature has remained the same for all time. Students will also gain knowledge in researching information and locating sources of information, a skill can that be used in every academic area as well as future careers. They will gain experience in using technology to compose a creative presentation. Also they will gain experience supporting their work with evidence. The presentation to the class will give students experience in public speaking and presentation skills. All of these applications are beneficial in all areas of academic and will carry over in their future work and life skills. Adaptations: There are few adaptations to be made since the PowerPoint the students are required to make will be done in groups and ESL, special needs, and gifted students will have their classmates around them to help. However, if more adaptation is needed, there are multiple teachers in the room for all English 12 classes that can assist the students one-on-one. The project can also be shortened for students by having them find a fewer number of quotations and comparisons, which will be checked and approved by a teacher before presenting. Possible Problems & Solutions: Since the students will be in the computer lab, there will be lots of off task behavior going on. To keep the students on task, their time in the lab will be limited. Another reoccurring problem with group work is the amount of work each student puts into the project. To keep one student from doing all of the work themselves, the students will fill out evaluation forms for each one of their peers. This
  17. 17. will ensure that each student is doing an equal amount of the work. If not, it will reflect in their classmates evaluations. Students will also have to take turns talking during the presentation. It will not be acceptable for students to say nothing about the work they have done. Assessment and/or Outcomes: How will you know if your objectives were met—if (or to what degree) the students learned what you wanted them to learn? The students will be assessed by the presentation they present to the class and by their own group members. Their presentation grade will be based on how well they relate an outside source to Macbeth and if they met the other criteria (5 similar quotes from each source, 5 comparisons between the source, listing sources used, and the quality of the video(s) they use). Each student will receive an individual grade. The grade from their peers and the presentation grade will be combined into one total score. The work they do in and outside of the lab will also be noted.
  18. 18. Macbeth Lesson Plan Service Learning Day 10 Context: This lesson was written for a twelfth grade general integrated language arts class in a suburban school district with 20 to 30 students per class. Broad, Lifelong Goal/s & Rationale: The students are applying their knowledge of Macbeth showing that they learned the affects of negative ambition. They will not only connect this to the play, but to real world events as well. By doing this, the students learn that stories are not the only places where people can have tragic flaws. Specific Daily Objectives: The students will work together in large groups to create a public mural displaying the theme of negative ambition in Macbeth. The mural they create must also connect with the outside world they live in and show that negative ambition is real and has/does still exist in the world. ODE and/or NCTE Standards: Reading app.: Informational, technical and persuasive text 3, Reading app. Literary Text 1, 5 Communication: Oral and visual 8. a, e, Materials: The students will need paper, pencils, and the art supplies/other supplies they need to create their mural. Methods: Anticipation: Read aloud one of the inspirational stories from It’s Our World Too! by Philip Hoose. The stories recount how young people have a voice and can make a difference in their schools and communities. Play “Hands” by Jewell while displaying the words on an overhead. Then discuss the meaning of the words she uses in her song. Students will connect these works with giving service. Introduction/Overview: Providing service to your school and community is a rewarding experience for yourself as well as those you are giving service to. This service builds pride and character. Introduce the service project of creating a mural to display in the halls of their school. The mural will depict scenes that of ill-effects of negative ambition. The students will create illustrations that teach morals learned from the themes of Macbeth but in present day situations. Students will be working in small groups as well as whole group to develop ideas and create the large mural to display in a central location of the school. Guided Practice or Modeling: Work in small groups of 3-4 students to create a blueprint for what the mural should look like. They can also work together to brainstorm ideas for real world illustrations that can be used in the mural. Then have each group share their ideas with the class while I (the teacher) make a large list of ideas on chart paper. Develop as a group a title or slogan that can be used on the mural that represents to message they are trying to convey to their peers in the student body. Create a mock-up design for the mural.
  19. 19. Application: Using large sheet of butcher block paper the students will pencil in scenes that depict the themes leaned from Macbeth. Students will be using their creativity to apply knowledge learned from literature to present day situations that they face in their everyday lives, and then sharing it with their school community as a service learning project. When the mural has been completed in pencil then students can use Tempra paints to complete the mural. Adaptations: This is an interactive activity. The students will be working together and interacting to display the theme in Macbeth. No exceptions will be given on the amount of time the project is to be completed in since there are enough students involved to complete it in time. Multiple teachers for these classes are present each period to help students with their ideas and approve their mural ideas. Possible Problems & Solutions: Unfortunately, this is high school and I have a handful of students who do not elect to participate in group activities and do not participate well with select others. Depending on how many groups there are per class, I can separate students from each other. Assessment and/or Outcomes: The students will be assessed by their participation with their group members and their class participation creating the mural. Each student will document their ideas for the mural and what they did to help create it.
  20. 20. References Blum, H., Lipsett, L., & Yocom, D. (2002, March). Literature circles. Remedial & Special Education, 23(2), 99. Retrieved May 6, 2009, from Academic Search Complete database. Boardman Moen, C. (2005, May). Literature circles revisited. Book Links, 14(5), 52-53. Retrieved May 6, 2009, from Academic Search Complete database. Brabham, E., & Villaume, S. (2000, November). Continuing conversations about literature circles. Reading Teacher, 54(3), 278-280. Retrieved May 6, 2009, from Education Research Complete database. Clarke, L., & Holwadel, J. (2007, September). Help! What is wrong with these literature circles and how can we fix them?. Reading Teacher, 61(1), 20-29. Retrieved May 6, 2009, doi:10.1598/RT.61.1.3 Lin, C. (2004, February). Literature circles. Teacher Librarian, 31(3), 23-25. Retrieved May 6, 2009, from Education Research Complete database. Swope, John W. (2005). Ready-to-use activities for teaching macbeth. New York: Center for Applied Research in Education.

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