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2020 Point In Time Count

Overview of the results of the 2019 HUD Mandated Point In Time (PIT) Count for Crook, Deschutes, and Jefferson counties and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs in Central Oregon including supplemental data and alternatives to homelessness.

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2020 Point In Time Count

  1. 1. 2020 Point in Time Count DESCHUTES, CROOK AND JEFFERSON COUNTIES INCLUDING THE CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF WARM SPRINGS
  2. 2. Mission The Homeless Leadership Coalition is a collaboration of community partners in Crook, Jefferson, and Deschutes counties including the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs engaging the community through education, advocacy, planning, prioritization and accountability for services to persons experiencing homelessness. We are driven by the knowledge that together “we are stronger, healthier, safer communities where people can thrive when everyone has a safe, stable place to call home!”
  3. 3. What is the Point in Time Count (PIT) PIT is a HUD mandated, nation wide survey of all people experiencing homelessness on a single night in January. Its intent is to monitor numbers, demographics, potential causes of homelessness, and how individuals are accessing services and resources in the community. PIT is organized and conducted by the local Continuum of Care, The Homeless Leadership Coalition, along with several volunteers from organizations serving those experiencing homelessness across the region.
  4. 4. Methodology Conducted for the night of January 29th, 2020; surveys were collected over the span of 3 days. Dozens of trained volunteers surveyed individuals in shelters, transitional housing, meal sites and food banks, drop-in centers, healthcare clinics, hotels/motels, campsites, national forest and street canvasing. Surveys were collected electronically as well as paper survey, all confidential. Counts took place across the tri-county region in Prineville, La Pine, Sisters, Redmond, Bend, Madras and Sunriver including the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs.
  5. 5. Definitions LITERALLY HOMELESS: “HUD HOMELESS” Sheltered: Emergency Shelter, Transitional Housing, Hotel/Motel paid for with a voucher. Unsheltered: Place not meant for human habitation (i.e. car, outside, abandoned building, etc. ALL PEOPLE EXPERIENCING HOMELESSNESS OR AT-RISK OF HOMELESSNESS Includes all HUD homeless, plus people who are “precariously housed”. People “at-risk” of homelessness or in unstable housing situations, such as doubled- up and not on a lease.
  6. 6. Why PIT is important? It helps monitor racial disparity in services, ensuring equity for minority clients. It helps to identify need based on location, ensuring resources are allocated where they are needed most. It provides invaluable information about our neighbors experiencing homelessness and allows us to shape our services to meet their needs. It shows prevalence of homelessness in Central Oregon and the local need for more resources to the federal government, bringing in funding to region.
  7. 7. How many people were experiencing homelessness in Central Oregon on January 29th, 2020? Single Individuals 52% Families 41% Young Families 1.5% Children only .5% Youth 5% NUMBER OF PEOPLE BY HOUSEHOLD TYPE
  8. 8. Sheltered status of homeless population 246 44 272 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Deschutes unsheltered other Sheltered
  9. 9. Sheltered status of homeless population 11 43 74 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs unsheltered other Sheltered
  10. 10. Sheltered status of homeless population 11 2 27 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Crook unsheltered other Sheltered
  11. 11. Sheltered status of homeless population 10 43 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Jefferson unsheltered Sheltered
  12. 12. Ages of homeless population 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 under 18 18-24 25-39 40-60 60+ Tri County Other unsheltered Precariously Housed Sheltered
  13. 13. Race & Ethnicity by county Deschutes Crook Jefferson CTWS
  14. 14. Gender by County 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Deschutes Crook Jefferson CTWS Try County Male Female Transgender Non-Conforming
  15. 15. Healthcare 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Deschutes Crook Jefferson CTWS Able to access healthcare when needed Yes No
  16. 16. How healthcare was accessed 0 50 100 150 200 250 Indian Health Services Medical Van Free Clinic Urgent Care Emergency Room Regular Doctor Deschutes County
  17. 17. How healthcare was accessed 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Indian Health Services Medical Van Free Clinic Urgent Care Emergency Room Regular Doctor Crook County
  18. 18. How healthcare was accessed 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Indian Health Services Medical Van Free Clinic Urgent Care Emergency Room Regular Doctor Jefferson County
  19. 19. How healthcare was accessed 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Indian Health Services Medical Van Free Clinic Urgent Care Emergency Room Regular Doctor Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs
  20. 20. Length of Time in Central Oregon CURRENT LENGTH OF TIME IN CO 26% 42% 19% 13% > 1 year 1-5 Years 6-10 years 10+ years 74% of participants surveyed had lived in Central Oregon for over a year.
  21. 21. A Neighborhood Issue The great majority (84%) were last housed in Oregon prior to becoming homeless. Only 16% of the population was last housed out of state and came to Oregon experiencing homelessness. LAST PLACE STABLY HOUSED 64% 20% 16% Central Oregon Oregon (outside CO) Out of state
  22. 22. Causes of Homelessness 0 100 200 300 400 500 Reasons for homelessness Natural Disaster Personal Trafficking Fleeing DV Legal Health Economic  Personal reasons included divorce, in home conflict, drug or alcohol abuse of a family member, etc.  Legal included criminal history, but also legal housing issues like property sold or no fault eviction.  Economic included inability to afford rent or loss of job.  Participants were able to select multiple reasons, all reasons were counted separately and included in the chart.
  23. 23. Cold Weather Shelter vs PIT 562 784 Deschutes PIT 2020 Cold Weather Shelters 128 94 CTWS PIT 2020 Cold Weather Shelter 53 121 Jefferson PIT 2020 40 66 Crook PIT 2020 Cold Weather Shelter
  24. 24. Prevention and Stability “One essential approach to reducing homelessness is to prevent it” • Eviction-prevention grants to help tenants at risk of becoming homeless pay back rent and remain in their current housing • Housing Courts • Effective discharge planning that includes housing assistance • Broader policy changes including living-wage jobs; access to affordable health care; and adequate public benefits for people living with disabilities.
  25. 25. Solutions Landlord Mitigation Funds Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) Direct Service Dollars – Homeless Outreach Homeless Prevention Strategies Warming shelters Low Barrier Shelters Mental Health Outreach Comprehensive data
  26. 26. Thank you! STAY CONNECTED BY JOINING OUR NEWSLETTER AT COHOMELESS.ORG

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