Creating a Resume

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This presentation was created to use when teaching resume classes at the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library in Charlotte, N.C.

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Creating a Resume

  1. 1. Creating a Resume<br />Charlotte Mecklenburg Library<br />Thursday, May 20<br />10:30 a.m.<br />
  2. 2. Creating a resume<br />That will knock their socks off.<br />
  3. 3. What you need to get started<br />A working telephone number where you can be reached.<br />A physical mailing address where you can be contacted.<br />An e-mail address where you can be contacted. (You will need an e-mail address so potential employers can contact you.)<br />A list of your previous jobs, going back at least 7-10 years and covering at least three separate employers, if your work history extends that far. <br />City and state<br />Dates<br />Duties and accomplishments<br />A list of the schools you attended<br />City and state<br />Dates<br />Degrees, certificates, etc..<br />A list of your most marketable skills (computer skills, typing/keyboarding rate, customer service, specific mechanical skills, etc.). <br />
  4. 4. The basics<br />A great resume doesn’t have to be long. (Or fit on one page.)<br />It does need to be clear, concise, easy to read, and grammatically correct.<br />
  5. 5. What goes where?<br />Tour of a resume<br />Name<br />Objective: A specific statement of your goals (Often omitted)<br />Address<br />E-mail address<br />Telephone #<br />This is not a traditional objective. It’s more of a personal summary. <br />Notice bullet points<br />Experience: Most current or most relevant first.<br />Headings are in all caps to make them stand out.<br />Optional headings: Include if relevant<br />Notice how all the bullets line up!<br />Skills: computer programs, languages, anything related to job<br />Name<br />Name<br />Objective: A specific statement of your goals (Often omitted)<br />Objective: A specific statement of your goals (Often omitted)<br />Address<br />Address<br />E-mail address<br />E-mail address<br />Telephone #<br />Telephone #<br />This is not a traditional objective. It’s more of a personal summary. <br />This is not a traditional objective. It’s more of a personal summary. <br />Notice bullet points<br />Notice bullet points<br />Experience: Most current or most relevant first.<br />Experience: Most current or most relevant first.<br />Headings are in all caps to make them stand out.<br />Headings are in all caps to make them stand out.<br />Accomplishments, not just duties.<br />Accomplishments, not just duties.<br />Accomplishments, not just duties.<br />Optional headings: Include if relevant<br />Optional headings: Include if relevant<br />Skills: computer programs, languages, anything related to job<br />Skills: computer programs, languages, anything related to job<br />Notice how all the bullets line up!<br />Notice how all the bullets line up!<br />
  6. 6. What do I put for … ?<br />My skills - The things you can do; any computer programs, typing, languages, unique systems you might have used in other jobs. If you are having trouble identifying skills, try using powerwords, which we’ll talk about in a minute.<br />My experience - Your work experience from the past 7-10 years. Give the name of employer, city and state, years worked, duties.<br />My education - Your highest level of education completed, date completed and any other degrees or certifications that would relate to the job for which you are applying.<br />My objective - A statement of your goal, such as: “To obtain a position using my customer service skills.” Many experts say you can omit the objective entirely.<br />
  7. 7. Power words<br />
  8. 8. How to use power words<br />A job description without power words: <br />“Operated cash register”<br />The same description using power words:<br />“Assisted customers with processing and payment of selected items, managed customer relations at point of sale”<br />Use these words to describe your past accomplishments and tasks. <br />Be careful! <br />These words should increase the clarity of your job descriptions, not make them more confusing.<br />Also useful as skills.<br />
  9. 9. All information on your resume should be accurate and current. <br />
  10. 10. To template or not to template<br />Template pros<br />Template cons<br />Nice little extras like lines, symbols, etc.<br />Does formatting for you<br />Can be hard to add more information later without messing up formatting<br />Can look overly familiar<br />
  11. 11. A few final tips<br />Always have a separate cover letter that highlights your qualifications for the specific job you are applying for. <br />Should match your resume in font, style<br />Have a list of at least three references with their addresses and phone numbers ready to supply to the employer if asked.<br />Type it up in the same font and style as your resume.<br />Contact your references to verify their information, ask for their permission to use them as a reference, and make sure they are in town and available. <br />Many people put “References available upon request” at the bottom of their resume if they have room, but it isn’t necessary.<br />

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