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Open house

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Open house

  1. 1. Welcome to Open House Park Trails Elementary Mrs. Ida Fourth Grade
  2. 2. Introduction Park Trails Mission Statement The mission of Park Trails Elementary is to create and sustain a positive learning community, in a safe and nurturing environment, where students are provided a well-rounded education that fosters life- long learning. Educational Philosophy Education is the key to the development of self and community. My goal is to help students gain the knowledge and skills that are essential for critical thinking, problem solving and expanding their sense of confidence in their own abilities. This is accomplished when I know the students’ strengths and weaknesses and create an environment in which each learner is respected and appreciated.
  3. 3. Developmental Stages of Fourth Graders Physical Development * uses tools fairly well * capable of fine hand and finger movements * draws with great detail * energetic - may persist with an activity until exhausted * has a large appetite * height and weight increasing at a steady rate * increased coordination and strength * body proportions becoming similar to an adult’s
  4. 4. Social and Emotional Development * disposition is generally happy; may experience some mood swings * likes to talk and share ideas * often dislikes the opposite sex intensely * friendships are quite important; enjoys clubs and activities * can distinguish between wishes, motives and actions * fairness is important * responsible; can be depended on and trusted * more independent, but wants adults to be present to help * can identify and label feelings he/she is experiencing
  5. 5. Intellectual Development * memorizes and recites facts, but may not show deep understanding * reads to learn (rather than learning to read) * has a strong desire to complete tasks * highly verbal (tells jokes, makes puns); asks fact- oriented questions (wants to know “how,” “why,” and “when”) * critical thinking starting to emerge; can deal with abstract ideas * aware of time, but needs help to plan in a practical way * judges success based on ability to read, write and do math * enjoys projects that are task oriented (sewing, woodwork)
  6. 6. Good Readers 1. Know how to choose a book. 2. Preview and predict. 3. Use a range of strategies to decode. 4. Monitor their reading and self correct mistakes. 5. Read with fluency (expression, intonation, prosody, rate and attention to punctuation). 6. Understand what they read - retelling, summarizing and making connections. 7. Good readers read! Include a variety of genre.
  7. 7. Levels of Comprehension Literal Understanding what is clearly stated in the text - students simply look back in the text to find the answer Inferential The ability to understand the implied message of the text. Readers need to find the clues in the text. Applied Reader uses the stated and implied information and applies it to what he/she already knows and arrives at a logical conclusion. Judgmental This is the level where a reader can process the information and arrive at an opinion or prediction that can be supported with facts and is logical to the story.
  8. 8. Ben sat on the front steps. His cheek was cupped in his hand and tears were trickling down his cheeks.On the step beside Ben lay a leash with the name”Rags” embossed on the leather. Ben had looked everywhere he could think, but it was no use. ________________________________________________________________________________ Literal - What is the name of the boy? Where is he sitting? What is on the step next to him? Inferential - How is Ben feeling? Applied - Who is Rags? Why do you think Ben is sad? Judgmental - What else might Ben do to find Rags?
  9. 9. Why read to your children? •Your child develops background knowledge of a variety of topics •Builds vocabulary •Becomes familiar with rich language patterns •Becomes familiar with story structures •Experiences the reading process •Identifies reading as an enjoyable activity •Listening comprehension level exceeds their reading comprehension level http://www.readingacrossbroward.com/
  10. 10. Variation in Amount of Independent Reading Percentile Rank Minutes/Day 98th 67.3 90th 33.4 70th 16.9 50th 9.2 30th 4.3 10th 1.0 2nd 0.0 85% of what students read should be easy 15% should be a bit of a challenge 0% at a difficult level
  11. 11. Why Does Your Child Need To Read Every Night? Student A reads 20 minutes five nights of every week; Student B reads only 4 minutes a night...or not at all! Step 1: Multiply minutes a night x 5 times each week. Student A reads 20 min. x 5 times a week = 100 mins./week Student B reads 4 minutes x 5 times a week = 20 minutes Step 2: Multiply minutes a week x 4 weeks each month. Student A reads 400 minutes a month. Student B reads 80 minutes a month. Step 3: Multiply minutes a month x 9 months/school year Student A reads 3600 min. in a school year. Student B reads 720 min. in a school year. Student A practices reading the equivalent of ten whole school days a year. Student B gets the equivalent of only two school days of reading practice. Which student would you expect to read better? Which student would you expect to know more? Which student would you expect to write better? Which student would you expect to have a better vocabulary?
  12. 12. Go Math Go
Math
was
specifically
written
to
address
Florida’s
Next
Generation
Sunshine
 State
Standards.

It
focuses
on
3
Big
Ideas
to
help
4th
graders
to
succeed
this
year
 and
beyond. Big
Idea
1
–
Whole
Number
Place
Value,
Multiplication
and
Division Big
Idea
2
‐
Understand
Decimals Big
Idea
3
‐
Area
and
Geometry The
intent
of
the
standards
is
not
to
teach
less
mathematics,
but
to
teach
fewer
 topics
at
each
grade.

In
turn,
these
topics
are
taught
in
a
way
that
aids
students
in
 developing
a
deep
understanding
of
the
content. Teaching
in
depth
does
not
necessarily
mean
more
difficult.

Instead,
it
is
a
way
of
 instructing
that
allows
students
to
develop
conceptual
understanding,
procedural
 fluency
and
real
world
problem
solving
skills. Pacing
of
the
lessons
is
based
on
the
grade
level
benchmarks
and
timing
of
the
test,
 which
ensures
comprehensive
instruction,
assessment,
practice
and
review
of
the
 standards
prior
to
the
state
test.
  13. 13. Computational Fluency •Having flexible methods of computing accurately •Fact Fluency: Knowing facts with automaticity and the ability to extend those facts to higher numbers •Demonstrating understanding of operations and strong number sense Problem Solving By solving problems, students acquire ways of thinking, habits of persistence and curiousity, and confidence in unfamiliar situations. Students should have opportunities to solve complex problems that require a significant amount of effort. Students will be encouraged to explain and discuss their thinking during the problem-solving process so they can adapt their strategies to other problems in different contexts.
  14. 14. Writing arts consists of preparation A major component of fourth grade language for the Florida Writes test. Florida Writes is a statewide assessment which is given to students in grades 4, 8 and 10. The students’ writing is rated from 0 to 6. The average score in Broward County is 4.0. The scores are based on the following criteria: Focus How clear the essay presents and maintains the main idea Organization The structure or plan of development (beginning, middle,end) Support Details used to clarify or explain (word choice) Conventions Use of punctuation, capitalization, spelling, sentence variety Grammar skills are taken from our reading text. *Spelling also has developmental stages - phonetic, transitional and conventional. 4th graders are expected to be able to have 80% spelling accuracy of the words they use in their own writing (not tests).
  15. 15. Homework Practice Preparation reinforce newly acquired skills relevant to upcoming topic not used for a grade not used for a grade differentiated creative Guidelines Extension organized place consistent schedule assigned with a grading rubric and timeline encourage, prompt specific directions Stop for bedtime encourages individual creativity parent information letter when necessary Homework Hotline 954-581-5377 **amount = 10 X grade level MON. - THURS. 4 to 8 PM
  16. 16. Teach Your Child These Concepts The importance of following directions and doing one’s own work The wisdom of asking questions Methods for preparing a complete and neat product The art of giving and receiving constructive criticism. How to manage one’s time to meet deadlines. The development of people skills to survive group projects.
  17. 17. Projects Purchase supplies. Take your child to the library. Hold the parts together until the glue sticks. Proofread your child’s work. Let your child rely on him or her self and his or her own inspiration to produce projects.
  18. 18. Home - School Connection Contact me: jacqueline.ida @browardschools.com or call 754-322-7800 http://mrsidasclass.edublogs.org/
  19. 19. Technology Class Website - updated weekly with information about curriculum, school events and pictures. Online Practice - students will be using online applications for homework as we move to becoming a paperless classroom. A few of these applications are: Study Island FCAT Explorer Spelling City Accelerated Reader Blogs - our class will be blogging later in the year. Internet safety is a primary concern. More information will be shared later in the year.
  20. 20. Miscellaneous Room Moms, Meet the Masters, Math Superstars Book Club Snacks Water Field Trips Absentee/Tardy Policy Birthdays

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