MAM When is good, good enough presentation

537 views

Published on

Minnesota Association of Museums Annual 2011 Conference session about collections care

Published in: Career
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
537
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

MAM When is good, good enough presentation

  1. 1. New  ques(ons  and  sustainability  in   Collec(ons  Care   or  
  2. 2. Websites,  List-­‐serves  and  groups:  h6p://museumpests.web.zaks.com/  -­‐  This  site  is  divided  into  four  main   sec@ons  (preven@on,  monitoring,  iden@fica@on,  treatment)  expanding  on  the  main   elements  listed  above  which  are  necessary  in  developing,  implemen@ng  and  managing  an   IPM  plan  for  your  ins@tu@on  –  whatever  your  collec@on  type.    h6p://www.nps.gov/museum/publica@ons/conserveogram/ cons_toc.html  -­‐  They  are  short,  focused  leaflets  about  caring  for  museum  objects,   published  in  loose-­‐leaf  format.  New  topics  are  added  as  needed  and  out-­‐of-­‐date  issues  are   revised  or  deleted.  Semiannual  supplements  will  be  issued  for  an  indeterminate  period.    h6p://www.spnhc.org/    -­‐  Society  for  the  preserva@on  of  Natural  History   Collec@ons  (SPNHC)  is  an  interna@onal  organiza@on  devoted  to  the  preserva@on,   conserva@on  and  management  of  natural  history  collec@ons.  h6p://www.aam-­‐us.org/  -­‐    "The  American  Associa@on  of  Museums’  mission  is  to   strengthen  museums  through  leadership,  advocacy,  collabora@on  and  service.”  ***Other  resources  I  use:  RCAAM,  NHColl,  Museumpest.net,  Linkedln  AAM  discussion  group,  MCN-­‐L,  blogs,   etc……..  
  3. 3. Websites,  list-­‐serves  and  groups  cont’d  h6p://www.minnesotamuseums.org/  -­‐  Minnesota  Associa@on  of   Museums  (MAM)  The  Minnesota  Associa@on  of  Museums  provides  a  forum  for   individuals  who  work  in  and  with  museums  throughout  the  state.  h6p://learning@mesevents.org/c2c/  -­‐  The  free  Connec@ng  to   Collec@ons  Webinar  series  featured  six  live  online  sessions.  The   Ins@tute  of  Museum  and  Library  Services  (IMLS),  in  partnership  with   Heritage  Preserva@on  and  the  American  Associa@on  for  State  and   Local  History  (AASLH),  presented  a  webinar  series  based  on  the   na@onal  ini@a@ve  Connec&ng  to  Collec&ons:  A  Call  to  Ac&on.  These   six  webinars  are  free  of  charge  to  staff  of  museums,  libraries,  and   archives  who  seek  to  enhance  collec@ons  care  at  their  ins@tu@ons.   This  site  runs  the  archived  sessions!  h6p://www.midwestmuseums.org/  -­‐  The  Associa@on  of  Midwest   Museums  (AMM)  is  an  organiza@on  that  provides  resources  to  museums  and  cultural   ins@tu@ons  and  services  to  museum  professionals  in  an  eight-­‐state  region  in  the   Midwest,  including  Illinois,  Indiana,  Iowa,  Michigan,  Minnesota,  Missouri,  Ohio,  and   Wisconsin.  
  4. 4. Books  that  I  think  are  helpful:  
  5. 5. Fiduciary  Responsibili@es  In  Prac@ce   1.  Maintain  the  highest  legal,  ethical,  and   professional  standards   2.  Establish  plans,  policies,  and  procedures   to  guide  opera@ons   3.  Delegate  authority  through  policy  and   procedure   What’s  the  difference  between  plans,  policies,  and  procedures?   Plans Policies Procedures •  Specific goals •  General guidelines to •  Detailed methodology for •  Rationale regulate activities performing activities •  How they will be achieved •  Ethical and professional •  Protocols to follow when •  Who will implement standards for exercising implementing policy •  When will it happen good judgment •  Succinct directions to •  What will it cost •  Delegate authority for accomplish a specific task •  Time-limited implementation •  Step-by-step “how to” •  Approved by governing •  Not inherently time-limited •  Approved at the staff level authority •  Approved by governing authority
  6. 6. What  is   Collec@ons   Planning?  “Collec@ons  planning  is  the  process  of  crea@ng  a  plan  that  guides  the  content  of  the  collec@ons  and  leads  staff  in  a  coordinated  and  uniform  direc@on  over  a  period  of  years  to  refine  and  expand  the  value  of  the  collec@ons  in  a  predetermined  way.  By  crea@ng  a  plan,  a  museum  seeks  to  gain  intellectual  control  over  collec@ons,  ensure  that  the  collec@ons  support  the  mission  of  the  museum,  reinforce  its  interpreta@on  and  research  ac@vi@es,  and  ensure  adequate  resources  for  collec@ons  acquisi@on  and  care”  (AAM  web  site).  
  7. 7. Why  Collec@ons   Planning?        “The  Accredita@on  Commission   has  iden@fied  a  pa6ern  of   recurring  problems  connected  to   collec@ons  stewardship  and   ins@tu@onal  planning:   insufficient  resources  to  support   collec@ons;  collec@ons  unrelated   to  the  ins@tu@on’s  mission;  and   a  lack  of  integra@on  between   planning  for  collec@ons,   interpreta@on,  and  facili@es”   Gardner  &  Merri6  (2002)   Museum  News.  
  8. 8. Collec@on  Policy  “A  detailed  wri9en  statement  that  explains  why  a  museum  is  in  opera(on  and  how  it  goes  about  its  business.  The  policy  ar(culates  the  professional  standards  regarding  objects  leC  in  its  care  and  serves  as  a  guide  for  the  staff  and  as  a  source  of  informa(on  for  the  public.”  Malaro  (1998)  A  Legal  Primer  on  Managing  Museum  Collec3ons.   Covers  broad  range  of  collec@on  related  topics:  scope  of  collec@ons,   acquisi@on,  accession,  deaccession,  intellectual  control,  preserva@on,   security,  use  of  collec@on,  collec@on  ethics,  loan,  insurance,  rights  and   reproduc@on,  abandoned  property,  and  cultural  sensi@vity  and   repatria@on.   Why  Develop  a  Collec@on  Policy?...besides  fiduciary  accountability  
  9. 9. Contents  of    a  Collec@on  Policy   •         Introduc@on   •         Standards  of  Conduct  and  Ethics     •         Scope  of  Collec@ons   •         Acquisi@ons  and  Accessions   •         Deaccessions   •         U@liza@on  of  Collec@ons   •  Abandoned  Property   •  Care  of  Collec@ons   •  Repatria@on  and  Management  of   Culturally  Sensi@ve  Material   •  Loans     •  Insurance   •  Authoriza@on  Note:  SMM  Collec@ons  Policy  sec@on  on  deaccessioning  is  a  part  of    “ Things  GREAT  and  SMALL    -­‐  Collec@ons  Management  Policies”  by  John  E.  Simmons  Chapter  8  pages  61-­‐62    
  10. 10. SMM  collec@on  policy  on  our  website  
  11. 11. Things  that  work  for  me…..  Numbering,  accessions  and  paper  product:  keep  it  simple  but  complete  and  legible!  Using  volunteers  with  collec@ons  work:  it  usually  is  a  good  thing  Collec@ons  Plan  –  even  a  rough  drao  is  a  good  idea  for  SO  many  reasons      Priori@es  –  how  to  decide  or  can  you?  Caring  for  collec@ons  now  and  for  the  future  –  think  farther  out  Electronic  material  coming  in  to  support  collec@ons  –  ACK!!!!!  Your  best  defense  is  a  good  offense  –  by  that  I  mean  taking  the  @me  to  have  policies  and   procedures  in  place   Thanks  for  listening………      
  12. 12. Good  Enough  
  13. 13. Constraints  •   Large  lobby  windows  •   Basement  collec(on  storage  area  •   Limited  collec(on  space  •   Limited  staff  &  budget  
  14. 14. Large  Lobby  Windows  •   Installed  UV  filters  •   We  try  not  to  display  sensi(ve  materials    
  15. 15. Center  Hall  Gallery  –  Light  spills  from  lobby  windows  into  galleries  •   Closely  monitor  light  levels  •   Rotate  items  on  display     Purchased  light  •   Use  facsimiles  when  possible   meter  through  a   grant  from  MN   Valley  Electric   Coopera3ve  
  16. 16. For  exhibits,  we…  • create  body  forms  out  of  ethafoam,  poly  &  stockine9e,    • paint/prime  exposed  wood  • adjust  light  cans  (using  a  light  meter)  •  Secure  collec(on  items,  in   cases,  encapsulate  •  monitor  items  and  rotate  as   needed…  
  17. 17. Collec3on  Storage  Area   Florescent  Lights   Overhead  water  pipes   Furnace  vent   Damp  wall   Cramped  shelving   Wood  Flooring   Four  HVAC  furnaces  
  18. 18. Landscaped  to  mi(gate   water  infiltera(on  Organized  –  in  PastPerfect   Dehumidifier   Ethafoam   buffer  Raised  4”  off  cement  floor   Sump  pump   Locked  collec(on  cages  
  19. 19. Limited  Collec3on   Space  Curator’s  Office  -­‐ Store  sensi(ve  collec(on  items  including  paper  items,  nega(ves,  photographs…  -­‐ House  collec(on  paperwork  files  
  20. 20. •   Organize  limited  space  •   Hang  items  •   Use  stairwell  
  21. 21. Limited  Staff  &  Budget   Volunteers  –  Go8a  LOVE  ‘em   •   Inventory  boxes   •   Repack  items   •   Sew  muslin  bags  for  oversized   tex(les   •   Sew  in  labels,  …   •   Work  on  specific  projects  in  depth     (ex:  digi3ze  oral  history  tapes,  enter   informa3on  into  PastPerfect,   organize  deed  of  giGs  &  related   paperwork)  
  22. 22. We  write  grants,  and  seek  sponsorships  and  dona@ons  to  purchase  archival  supplies,  light  meter,  hobos  and  various  other  items  related  to  collec@ons  care.  
  23. 23. Execu@ve  Director:  Kathleen  Klehr   Curator:  Theresa  Norman   952-­‐445-­‐0378   info@sco6countyhistory.org   www.sco6countyhistory.org    
  24. 24. Conserva@on  Supply  Sources  Acid-­‐free  @ssue  paper:  •  Conserva@on  Resources,  4432  Port  Royal  Rd.,  Springfield,  VA  22151,  800-­‐634-­‐6932,   www.conserva@onresources.com  •  Light  Impressions,  PO  Box  787,  Brea,  CA  92822-­‐0787,  800-­‐828-­‐6216,  www.ligh@mpressionsdirect.com  •  Talas,  20  West  20th  Street,  5th  Floor,  New  York,  NY  10011,  212-­‐219-­‐0770,  www.talas-­‐nyc.com  •  University  Products,  517  Main  St.,  PO  Box  101,  Holyoke,  MA  01041-­‐0101,  800-­‐628-­‐1912,   www.universityproducts.com  Unbleached,  unsized  muslin:  •  TestFabrics,  Inc.,  415  Delaware  Ave.,  Po  Box  26,  West  Pi6ston,  PA  18643,  570-­‐603-­‐0432,   www.tesxabrics.com  Acid-­‐free  tex@le  storage  boxes:  •  Conserva@on  Resources,  4432  Port  Royal  Rd.,  Springfield,  VA  22151,  800-­‐634-­‐6932,   www.conserva@onresources.com  •  Light  Impressions,  PO  Box  787,  Brea,  CA  92822-­‐0787,  800-­‐828-­‐6216,  www.ligh@mpressionsdirect.com  •  MuseuM  Services  Corpora@on,  385  Bridgepoint  Drive,  South  Saint  Paul,  MN  55075,  800-­‐672-­‐8954,   651-­‐450-­‐8954,  www.museumservicescorpora@on.com  •  University  Products,  517  Main  St.,  PO  Box  101,  Holyoke,  MA  01041-­‐0101,  800-­‐628-­‐1912,   www.universityproducts.com  
  25. 25. Tex@le  and  Conserva@on  Related  Websites:  •  www.conserva@on-­‐us.org  -­‐  American  Ins@tute  for  Conserva@on  of   Historic  &  Ar@s@c  Works  •  www.americanquilter.com  -­‐  American  Quilter’s  Society  •  www.cci-­‐icc.gc.ca  -­‐  Canadian  Conserva@on  Ins@tute  •  www.preserva@on.gc.ca  -­‐  Canadian  Conserva@on  Ins@tute,  Preserving   My  Heritage  •  www.nps.gov/hfc  -­‐  Harpers  Ferry  Center  •  Midwest  Regional  Conserva@on  Guild  •  www.seregistrars.org/Tools.html  -­‐  Southeastern  Registrars  Associa@on    
  26. 26. Tex@le  Care  Bibliography  •  Alig,  D.  and  H.  Mailand,  Preserving  Tex&le:  a  guide  for  the   nonspecialist.  Indianapolis,  IN:  Indianapolis  Museum  of  Art,  1999.  •  Emery,  I.  The  Primary  Structure  of  Fabrics:  an  illustrated   classifica&on.  London,  Thames  &  Hudson,  1994  •  Perry,  D.,  et  al.  Iden&fica&on  of  Tex&le  Materials.  Manchester,  UK:   The  Tex@le  Ins@tute,  1985.  •  Sullivan,  Brigid.    Guidelines  for  Furnishings  Maintenance  and   Protec&on.    Harpers  Ferry  Center:    U.S.  Department  of  the  Interior,   1991.  
  27. 27. Thanks  for  coming  and  listening…   Ques@ons  or  comments?  

×