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DRAFT

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DRAFT

  1. 1. DRAFT Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Issue Date Date of last Date of next review Staff Involved review
  2. 2. Contents Introduction 4 Purpose 4 Hampshire Children’s Trust 5 Local Children’s Partnerships 8 Roles and responsibilities 10 Hampshire’s Children and Young People’s Plan 2009-12 12 Performance management 13 Appendices: Appendix 1: National Indicators 17 Appendix 2: Toolkit for the development of local delivery plans 22 Appendix 3: Template for local delivery plans 25 Appendix 4: Hampshire Children’s Trust performance management 38 structure Appendix 5: Template for Local Children’s Partnership annual self- 39 assessment Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 3 of 58
  3. 3. Introduction Hampshire Children’s Trust represents all those working for, and with, the county’s children, young people and their families. The Trust has a shared vision of making Hampshire a better place for all children and young people, where all of them, including those who are vulnerable or disadvantaged, have the best possible start in life and are supported by the whole community to reach their potential (Hampshire’s Children and Young People’s Plan 2009-12). This document sets out the performance management framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust, including the 25 Local Children’s Partnerships. The framework will demonstrate the effectiveness of the Children’s Trust in improving outcomes for children and young people against the objectives within the Children and Young People’s Plan. Purpose The Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust provides a clear and robust planning and performance process to deliver the priorities of the Children and Young People’s Plan and support continuous improvements in service delivery across the county. It has been developed in line with: • Children’s Trusts: Statutory guidance on inter-agency co-operation to improve well-being of children, young people and their families, DCSF 2008; • Children’s Act 2004; • Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning Act 2009; • Developing Local Children’s Partnerships, report to Hampshire Children’s Trust Board, 1 July 2009; • Are we there yet? Improving governance and resource management in children’s trusts, Audit Commission 2008. The Framework is supported by: • Hampshire Children’s Trust Partnership Agreement; • Hampshire Children’s Trust Governance Framework; • Toolkit for the development of Local Children’s Partnership delivery plans (appendix 2); • Template for local delivery plans (appendix 3); • Template for Local Children’s Partnership annual self-assessment (appendix 5). Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 4 of 58
  4. 4. Hampshire Children’s Trust Background Hampshire Children’s Trust, formerly known as the Children and Young People’s Partnership, was developed to meet the requirements of the Children Act 2004 – specifically Section 10, the ‘duty to co-operate’. This established a statutory duty for the following bodies to co-operate to improve the well-being of children and young people in an area: • local authorities; • district and borough councils; • police; • local probation boards; • youth offending services; • strategic health authorities; • primary care trusts; • local Learning and Skills Council. The Government has recently strengthened Children’s Trusts by extending the duty to co-operate to maintained schools and academies; and sixth form and further education colleges. These changes form part of the Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning Children Act 2009, which has also placed the Children’s Trust Board on a statutory footing, with responsibility for developing, publishing and monitoring the Children and Young People’s Plan. Function The Children’s Trust is responsible for improving the well-being of all Hampshire’s children and young people, with a focus on addressing inequalities for those facing the greatest risks and barriers and strengthening support for individual children, young people, their families and communities, where needed. The role of the Children’s Trust is to put in place the ‘five essential features’ of a Trust, as established by statutory guidance (Children’s Trusts: Statutory guidance on inter-agency co-operation to improve well-being of children, young people and their families, DCSF 2008). These are as follows: 1. Developing and promoting a child and family centred, outcome led vision for all children and young people via the Children and Young People’s Plan, clearly informed by their views and those of their parents and the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment. 2. Putting in place robust arrangements for inter-agency governance (through the Children’s Trust Board). 3. Developing integrated strategy: joint planning and commissioning; pooled and aligned budgets; and the Children and Young People’s Plan. Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 5 of 58
  5. 5. 4. Integrating processes, supported through effective joint working - sustained by a shared language and processes. 5. Developing and promoting integrated front line delivery organised around the child, young person or family rather than professional or institutional boundaries. Hampshire Children’s Trust will meet these requirements by: • agreeing priorities for improvement across children’s services through the development and implementation of the Children and Young People’s Plan for Hampshire; • routinely assessing and monitoring the needs of Hampshire’s children and young people; • providing rigorous and robust local safeguarding arrangements, in partnership with Hampshire Safeguarding Children Board; • engaging children and young people in the planning, delivery and evaluation of services and provision; • working in partnership with parents and carers, and providing information, advice and support when needed; • putting in place robust arrangements for interagency governance, with partners coming together to agree common priorities and activities whilst retaining accountability to their existing governance and management arrangements; • identifying opportunities for integrated commissioning and developing stronger partnership arrangements, including the alignment of budgets to improve outcomes and provide value for money; and the sharing of data and other information; • strengthening and promoting early intervention and prevention strategies through better integrated front line service delivery, organised around the child, young person or their family rather than professional or institutional boundaries; • better integration of services to deliver the CYPP vision, including developing closer working between early years settings, children’s centres, schools, colleges and partner organisations – narrowing gaps in outcomes for disadvantaged groups against a background of improved outcomes for all; • developing more integrated processes including effective joint working, sustained by a shared understanding of professional language and common systems; • providing professional development opportunities to build the skills, expertise and capacity of all those working with children and young people in Hampshire; • taking account of government requirements and responding to external review and inspection. Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 6 of 58
  6. 6. Membership Hampshire Children’s Trust Board membership meets the statutory requirements of the Children Act 2004 and the proposed amendments to this act, as outlined in the Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning Bill 2009. The Board includes representatives from: • Hampshire County Council Children’s Services Department (the Director of Children’s Services and Executive Lead Member for Children’s Services); • District and Borough Councils; • Hampshire Constabulary; • Hampshire Primary Care Trust and South Central Strategic Health Authority; • Learning and Skills Council; • Schools and colleges; • Early years settings; • Wessex Youth Offending Team and the Hampshire Probation Service; • Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service; • Jobcentre Plus; • Community and voluntary sector organisations. All members of Hampshire Children’s Trust Board share accountability for the work of the Trust in addition to being accountable to the organisations that they represent. All members have a mandate to speak for their agency, organisation or sector, meaning that they are able to agree the strategic direction of Hampshire Children’s Trust on behalf of their organisation and ensure that agreements are reflected in their organisation’s plans and strategies. Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 7 of 58
  7. 7. Local Children’s Partnerships Following the establishment of Hampshire’s Children’s Trust and publication of the first Hampshire Children and Young People’s Plan in 2006, a range of local partnership activity developed across the county, with the purpose of identifying local priorities and associated plans to improve outcomes for children and young people at a community level. National developments, outlined by guidance and consultation documents, led to an evaluation of Hampshire’s arrangements for local partnership working. Hampshire Children’s Trust Board considered options for strengthening arrangements to form consistent, effective Local Children’s Partnerships, able to meet both national and local requirements. The key issues to be addressed included the: • extension of the duty to co-operate to schools; • development of ‘21st century schools’ as the hub for service co-ordination for all children within a community; • need to strengthen accountability between local partnership arrangements and the county Children’s Trust; • duty of all partners to implement the Children and Young People’s Plan; • creation of capacity through partnerships and integrated working; • need to align the work of local children’s services partnerships with Local Strategic Partnerships and the delivery of Local Area Agreement targets; • delivery of the county Children and Young People’s Plan at a local level. As a result, the framework for Local Children’s Partnerships in Hampshire has been developed. These partnerships are based upon direct involvement from all schools and partners in an area and are responsible for improving a wide range of outcomes (both educational and social) for children and young people. Membership The core membership of each Local Children’s Partnership consists of: • schools and academies; • sixth form and further education colleges; • District/Borough Council(s); • local level healthcare managers/providers; • local Hampshire County Council Children’s Services Department representatives, including District Manager; • local managers/co-ordinators of children’s centres, parent support and other services. Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 8 of 58
  8. 8. Structure Hampshire’s Local Children’s Partnerships are based on natural community boundaries and also reflect school catchment areas. There are 25 partnerships, covering geographical localities as outlined by the map below. Map to be included Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 9 of 58
  9. 9. Roles and responsibilities Hampshire Children’s Trust arrangements comprise of: • Hampshire Children’s Trust Board; • county ‘working groups/sub-groups’ aligned to the Children’s Trust Board; • Local Children’s Partnerships. Hampshire Children’s Trust Board Hampshire Children’s Trust Board has specific responsibility for the development and review of the county level Children and Young People’s Plan, with the overall aim of improving outcomes for children, young people and their families. The Board is jointly chaired by the Director of Children’s Services and the Executive Lead Member for Children’s Services. County ‘working groups/sub-groups’ These groups are responsible for managing or promoting improved outcomes in a particular theme, for example the Teenage Pregnancy Partnership and the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services Commissioning Group. Groups may also be established to support the work of the Children’s Trust, for example information sharing or data quality. Working groups/sub-groups will report directly to the Hampshire Children’s Trust Board against agreed annual reporting timelines. Local Children’s Partnerships Local Children’s Partnerships will implement the priorities of Hampshire’s Children and Young People’s Plan through the development and implementation of Local Children’s Partnerships delivery plans. This is outlined in further detail under performance management, below. The specific responsibilities of Local Children’s Partnerships are: • guiding and supporting integrated working to focus on key performance improvements, across agencies and boundaries; • strengthening local networks to enable effective integrated working across children’s services in an area, thus enhancing its sense of community and ‘place’; • developing a detailed level of intelligence and understanding of outcomes for children and young people within an area in order to promote a focus on the needs of local communities (including the sharing of data to support needs assessment and performance management); • identifying the contribution of local partners to the priorities of the county Children and Young People’s Plan through the development of local delivery plans; • strengthening the links between local partners and the county Children’s Trust; Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 10 of 58
  10. 10. • monitoring, managing and reporting performance against the local delivery plan, including providing support and challenge within the partnership and meeting the reporting requirements of the county Children’s Trust; • ensuring the participation of children and young people in service design, delivery and evaluation, in line with Hampshire County Council’s Participation Strategy; • being the local commissioning and delivery capability of the Children’s Trust – pooling budgets and influencing partners in the deployment of resources; • over time, taking direct responsibility for the improvement of agreed and defined outcomes, such as reducing teenage conceptions and the proportion of young people not in employment, education or training; • over time, directly co-ordinating or managing key activities around early intervention and prevention. Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 11 of 58
  11. 11. Hampshire’s Children and Young People’s Plan 2009-12 The Children and Young People’s Plan (CYPP) 2009-12 is the key strategic plan for Hampshire Children’s Trust, establishing the key strategies and priorities for improving outcomes for children and young people against all five of the Every Child Matters outcomes. The Plan does not prescribe in detail what people have to do, or how they have to do it, neither does it attempt to list every initiative or provision. Instead, it provides an overarching framework, promoting a shared vision and a number of priorities, aimed at children, young people, parents, carers and communities. The degree to which these priorities are met will be the measure of the Plan’s success. The priorities for Hampshire Children’s Trust have been identified through a comprehensive needs assessment of outcomes for children and young people across the county. The table below details Hampshire’s CYPP priorities for 2009-12: Hampshire priorities 1. Reducing the incidence and impact of poverty on the achievement and life chances of children and young people 2. Securing children and young people’s physical, spiritual, social, emotional and mental health, promoting healthy lifestyles and reducing inequalities 3. Providing opportunities to learn that raise children and young people’s aspirations, encourage excellence and enable them to enjoy and achieve beyond their expectations 4. Ensuring that children and young people are safe and feel safe, enabling them to build resilience and personal confidence 5. Providing vocational, leisure and recreational activities that provide opportunities for children and young people to experience success and make a positive contribution 6. Removing barriers to access, participation and achievement and not tolerating discrimination and abuse The Improvement Plan (within Appendix 1 of the CYPP) outlines the actions required to deliver the priorities, with success measures and targets. Progress against the priorities within Hampshire’s CYPP is due in April 2010. Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 12 of 58
  12. 12. Performance management Hampshire Children’s Trust Progress against the priorities in Hampshire’s Children and Young People’s Plan (CYPP) will be measured against a number of success indicators outlined in the Improvement Plan. These include Local Area Agreement (LAA) performance indicators and a range of National Indicators (which central government and local authorities use to monitor their performance and progress against targets). Hampshire Children’s Trust will receive reports on progress against the CYPP twice yearly, with quarterly performance updates against key National Indicators and LAA targets. Therefore, LAA reporting will support the performance management of the CYPP. Reports will include summary feedback against key actions using a red/amber/green system and providing disaggregated data sets both at county and district level. The Children’s Trust Board will be responsible for identifying and managing any risks to delivery. Local Children’s Partnerships The performance management of Hampshire’s Local Children’s Partnerships consists of: • the development and implementation of local delivery plans; • performance management standards for Local Children’s Partnership members; • a performance review process, including twice-yearly reporting of progress against Local Children’s Partnership delivery plans; annual self- assessment; and support and challenge provided by Hampshire County Council Children’s Services Department District Managers. The elements of this performance management cycle are shown by the below diagram: Annual self- Needs assessment of assessment local children’s & partnership consultation Twice yearly Development & reporting of implementation progress against of local delivery local delivery plan plan Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 13 of 58
  13. 13. Local Children’s Partnership delivery plans Local Children’s Partnerships are required to develop and implement a local delivery plan, identifying key priorities and actions to improve outcomes for children and young people within their communities. These priorities will be informed by the key priorities of the county CYPP. Each plan will contain clear measures that can be used to monitor progress against a number of identified National Indicators (see appendix 1). A toolkit for the development of plans is provided in appendix 2, with full template in appendix 3. Performance management standards for Local Children’s Partnership members Underpinning this Performance Management Framework is an expectation that all parts of Hampshire’s Children’s Trust will have effective operational performance management mechanisms in place. Members of Local Children’s Partnerships have a responsibility to ensure that the priorities and key activities of the local delivery plan are embedded within their own organisational plans/strategies. The minimum performance management standards for Local Children’s Partnership members are as follows: • clear arrangements for the allocation of activities and targets in the local delivery plan; • strategies for the regular participation of children, young people and their families in service design, delivery and review, as established within the Hampshire County Council Participation Strategy; • robust planning and reporting processes in order to demonstrate progress against agreed plans or contracts, including needs assessment and mechanisms to address poor performance; • participation in integrated processes such as the Common Assessment Framework; • effective monitoring of contracts, meaning that all contracts have an agreed specification that includes outcome measures and are monitored at least annually; • clear and robust systems for agreeing and monitoring the allocation of resources to meet local delivery plan priorities; • regularly monitored, clear quality standards for service delivery; • robust systems for identifying, monitoring and mitigating against risks. The structure of performance management for Hampshire Children’s Trust and Local Children’s Partnerships is shown in appendix 4. Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 14 of 58
  14. 14. Performance review process Children’s Services Department District Managers will provide a support and challenge role for Local Children’s Partnerships, including: • providing feedback on performance; • challenging and supporting the partnership to improve outcomes and narrow the gap between the most vulnerable children and young people and their peers; • influencing members of the partnership to be fully engaged and ensure their commitment to delivery of agreed priorities and actions; • representing Children’s Services issues at a local level, ensuring the engagement of other managers as necessary; • ensuring the appropriate engagement of Hampshire County Council services not managed at a local level; • ensuring that Hampshire County Council services and Children’s Services more specifically, are fully committed to supporting the partnership in its work to define and understand local need and develop a local delivery plan; • ensuring that Hampshire County Council services and local children’s services specifically, are focused upon agreed priority areas as set out in the county CYPP and reflected in the local delivery plan; • acting as a resource in terms of providing and interpreting performance and demographic data/information to partners; and ensuring that performance is regularly reviewed and understood by partners; • briefing senior managers and Elected Members on local issues, as necessary; • ensuring that links with Local Strategic Partnerships are maintained and fully utilised; • working in conjunction with the voluntary and community sector to support engagement with a broad base of local stakeholders, particularly children, young people and their families; • undertaking commissioning, procurement and management of services on behalf of the partnership, as necessary and appropriate; • supporting the partnership in evaluating and reporting progress to the Children’s Trust Board. The performance review process consists of: • District Manager attendance at meetings of the Local Children’s Partnership; • District Manager support during the development and review of local delivery plans; • Local Children’s Partnerships providing twice-yearly reports on progress against local delivery plans; Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 15 of 58
  15. 15. • an annual self-assessment of the Local Children’s Partnership, in order to review progress in implementing the local delivery plan and the overall effectiveness of the partnership over the preceding year. Each Local Children’s Partnership will provide a twice-yearly (October and April) report on progress against their children and young people’s delivery plan. This will include data to demonstrate progress against performance indicators and success measures. Reports will be considered in partnership meetings, with support and challenge provided by members, specifically District Managers. In addition, reports will be submitted to the county Children’s Trust Board for inclusion in performance reports on the county Children and Young People’s Plan. The April report will be used to form part of the annual self-assessment (see appendix 5 for the annual self-assessment template). Needs assessment Hampshire’s Children and Young People’s Plan is based on a thorough needs assessment carried out by the County Council, Primary Care Trust and other key partners (the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment). This assessment will be refreshed on an annual basis, using data provided from across the Children’s Trust (including Local Children’s Partnerships) to ensure that the county Children and Young People’s Plan and Local Children’s Partnership delivery plans remain relevant and appropriate. Additional sources of information will also be used to refresh county and local plans, including: • feedback from children, young people and their families; • external inspection results; • internal audit activity; • any service specific needs assessment/consultation activities. Information sharing In order to support joint working, child level information needs to be routinely shared between partner agencies. This exchange facilitates evidence based practice at a practitioner level to support individual children and at an organisational level to support strategic decision making, needs assessment and joint commissioning. Hampshire Children’s Trust has developed an Information Sharing Protocol and Operational Agreement as the framework for information sharing between partners. The Information Sharing Protocol outlines the overarching policy, requiring partners to agree the concept of sharing information for the benefit of children, young people and their families. Each Children’s Trust member should sign and adhere to the Operational Agreement, which supports specific exchanges of data/information between practitioners for the purpose of safeguarding, crime prevention and well-being. Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 16 of 58
  16. 16. Appendix 1 National Indicators Local Children’s Partnerships are accountable for securing improvements against the following National Indicators through their local delivery plan. CYPP NI Ref NI Description Priority NI 19 5 Rate of proven re-offending by young offenders Young people within the Youth Justice System receiving a NI 43 5 conviction in court who are sentenced to custody Ethnic composition of offenders on Youth Justice System NI 44 5 disposals Young offenders engagement in suitable education, NI 45 5 training and employment NI 46 5 Young offenders access to suitable accommodation NI 50 2 Emotional health of children NI 51 Effectiveness of child and adolescent mental health 2 (LAA) (CAMHS) services NI 52 2 Take up of school lunches NI 53 2 Prevalence of breastfeeding at 6 – 8 weeks from birth NI 54 2 Services for disabled children NI 55 2 Obesity in primary school age children in Reception NI 56 2 Obesity in primary school age children in Year 6 (LAA) Children and young people’s participation in high-quality NI 57 2 PE and sport NI 58 2 Emotional and behavioural health of looked after children % of Initial assessments for children’s social care carried NI 59 4 out within 7 working days of referral % of core assessments for children’s social care that were NI 60 4 carried out within 35 working days of their commencement NI 61 4 Timeliness of placements of looked after children for adoption following an agency decision that the child should Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 17 of 58
  17. 17. CYPP NI Ref NI Description Priority be placed for adoption NI 62 Stability of placements of looked after children: number of 4 (LAA) placements Stability of placements of looked after children: length of NI 63 4 placement NI 64 4 Child Protection Plans lasting 2 years or more NI 65 % of Children becoming the subject of a Child Protection 4 (LAA) Plan for a second or subsequent time Looked after children cases which were reviewed within NI 66 4 required timescales % of child protection cases which were reviewed within NI 67 4 required timescales % of referrals to children’s social care going on to initial NI 68 4 assessment NI 69 4 Children who have experienced bullying Hospital admissions caused by unintentional and NI 70 4 deliberate injuries to children and young people NI 71 4 Children who have run away from home/care overnight Achievement of at least 78 points across the Early Years Foundation Stage with at least 6 in each of the scales in NI 72 3 Personal Social and Emotional Development and Communication, Language and Literacy Achievement at level 4 or above in both English and Maths NI 73 3 at Key Stage 2 (Threshold) Achievement of 5 or more A*-C grades at GCSE or NI 75 3 equivalent including English and Maths Reduction in number of schools where fewer than 65% of NI 76 3 pupils achieve at level 4 or above in both English and Maths at KS2 Reduction in number of schools where fewer than 30% of NI 78 3 pupils achieve 5 or more A*-C grades at GCSE and equivalent including GCSEs in English and Maths NI 79 5 Achievement of a Level 2 qualification by the age of 19 Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 18 of 58
  18. 18. CYPP NI Ref NI Description Priority (LAA) NI 80 1 Achievement of a Level 3 qualification by the age of 19 Inequality gap in the achievement of a Level 3 qualification NI 81 1 by the age of 19 Inequality gap in the achievement of a Level 2 qualification NI 82 1 by the age of 19 Achievement of 2 or more A*-C grades in Science GCSEs NI 84 3 or equivalent Post-16 participation in physical sciences (A Level NI 85 5 Physics, Chemistry and Maths) Secondary schools judged as having good or outstanding NI 86 3 standards of behaviour NI 87 3 Secondary school persistent absence rate NI 88 3 % of schools providing access to extended services Reduction in number of schools judged as requiring NI 89 3 special measures and improvement in time taken to come out of the category NI 90 5 Take up of 14-19 learning diplomas NI 91 5 Participation of 17 year-olds in education or training Narrowing the gap between the lowest achieving 20% in NI 92 1 the Early Years Foundation Stage Profile and the rest Progression by 2 levels in English between Key Stage 1 NI 93 3 and Key Stage 2 Progression by 2 levels in Maths between Key Stage 1 and NI 94 3 Key Stage 2 Looked after children reaching level 4 in English at Key NI 99 3 Stage 2 Looked after children reaching level 4 in Maths at Key NI 100 3 Stage 2 Looked after children achieving 5 A*-C GCSEs (or NI 101 3 equivalent) at Key Stage 4 (including English and Maths) Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 19 of 58
  19. 19. CYPP NI Ref NI Description Priority Achievement gap between pupils eligible for free school NI 102 1 meals and their peers achieving the expected level at Key (LAA) Stages 2 and 4 Special Educational Needs – statements issued within 26 NI 103 3 weeks The Special Educational Needs (SEN)/non-SEN gap – NI 104 3 achieving Key Stage 2 English and Maths threshold The Special Educational Needs (SEN)/non-SEN gap – NI 105 3 achieving 5 A*-C GCSE inc. English and Maths Young people from low income backgrounds progressing NI 106 1 to higher education Key Stage 2 attainment for Black and minority ethnic NI 107 6 groups Key Stage 4 attainment for Black and minority ethnic NI 108 6 groups NI 109 1 Number of Sure Start Children's Centres NI 110 5 Young people’s participation in positive activities NI 111 First time entrants to the Youth Justice System aged 10 – 5 (LAA) 17 NI 112 2 Under 18 conception rate (LAA) NI 113 2 Prevalence of Chlamydia in under 25 year olds NI 114 3 Rate of permanent exclusions from school NI 115 2 Substance misuse by young people NI 116 1 Proportion of children in poverty NI 117 16 to 18 year olds who are not in education, training or 5 (LAA) employment (NEET) NI 118 1 Take up of formal childcare by low-income working families NI 126 2 Early access for women to maternity services NI 147 1 Care leavers in suitable accommodation NI 148 5 Care leavers in employment, education or training Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 20 of 58
  20. 20. CYPP NI Ref NI Description Priority (LAA) Children and young people’s satisfaction with parks and NI 199 5 play areas Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 21 of 58
  21. 21. Appendix 2 Toolkit for the development of Local Children’s Partnership delivery plans All local delivery plans must be approved by Hampshire Children’s Trust prior to publication. 1. Local Children’s Partnership vision The vision of the Local Children’s Partnership should be a clear and concise statement, reflecting the partnership’s aspirations for children and young people in the area. This should be developed in consultation with children, young people, families and other stakeholders. Checklist: • The vision is a clear and straightforward statement • It reflects the priorities of the county Children and Young People’s Plan • It takes into account key policies and priorities for the area • It reflects the needs and wants of local children, young people and their families • It ‘means something’ to children, young people and their families • It has the support of the whole Local Children’s Partnership 2. The role of needs assessment and data The local delivery plan should reflect the specific needs of the children, young people and families in the local area, whilst demonstrating contributions to the county level plan. The priorities of the local plan should be developed through a comprehensive needs assessment, based on data at a local level. Hampshire County Council is committed to developing a Local Children’s Partnership level dataset, based on the National Indicator set and a range of supporting local indicators (as appropriate). This data should be used to support an analysis of services available in the local area and how well these are meeting needs. A summary of the needs assessment, and how this informed the development of priorities, should be included in the final local delivery plan. Checklist: • All services currently available in the area have been identified • The assessment provides an accurate picture of what it is like to live in the area for children, young people and their families • Data has been used to assess the needs of children, young people and families in the local area Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 22 of 58
  22. 22. • Feedback from children, young people and their families been considered • The assessment has identified the gaps in service provision • The assessment covers all five of the Every Child Matters outcomes • A range of good quality sources have been used 3. Identifying priorities The priorities of the Local Children’s Partnership should be determined by an analysis of the needs assessment against the local vision i.e. what are the key areas for improvement in order to meet the vision? The local delivery plan should demonstrate the links between needs assessment and the final priorities. Checklist: • The priorities are clearly linked to the needs assessment • The delivery plan shows the link between the local priorities and the county Children and Young People’s Plan priorities • Priorities are clear and easily understood (including by children, young people and their families) • They have been agreed by the whole Local Children’s Partnership 4. Developing a local delivery plan The delivery plan should be clearly aligned with the county Children and Young People’s Plan, demonstrating how the local plan contributes towards meeting targets within the county level plan. A template is provided (shown in appendix 3) to ensure that all local delivery plans are in the same format as the county plan, enabling effective monitoring of progress across all plans and partnerships. The delivery plan should also have a focus on the locally agreed priorities, with a series of actions developed to support improvement in these areas. Local delivery plans will need to outline how resources are linked to activities, in order to ensure that resources follow priorities and that sufficient resource is available. The lead organisation/agency for each activity should also be clear. Checklist: • Hampshire Children’s Trust’s local delivery plan template has been used • The delivery plan clearly outlines activities to support the delivery of the county level plan Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 23 of 58
  23. 23. • Activities have clear success measures, targets, deadlines, lead organisation/agency and resource allocation identified • The delivery plan has been agreed by the whole Local Children’s Partnership • The delivery plan is used as a basis for any commissioning or procurement 5. Template/structure for Local Children’s Partnership delivery plans A standard template for all local delivery plans has been developed (provided as appendix 3 of this document). Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 24 of 58
  24. 24. Appendix 3: Template for Local Children’s Partnership delivery plan Hampshire Children’s Trust Delivery Plan for the Local Children’s Partnership
  25. 25. Contents Introduction Section One: Visions and Priorities Vision Needs assessment Priorities Section Two: Delivery Plan Delivery plan Appendices Appendix One: Local Children’s Partnership contact details Appendix Two: Links to other plans and strategies Appendix Three: Glossary Hampshire Children’s Trust - Delivery Plan for the Local Children’s Partnership Page 26 of 58
  26. 26. Introduction The introduction needs to outline how the local delivery plan supports the priorities of the Hampshire Children and Young People’s Plan. Hampshire Children’s Trust - Delivery Plan for the Local Children’s Partnership Page 27 of 58
  27. 27. Section One: Visions and Priorities Vision Needs Assessment Priorities Hampshire Children’s Trust - Delivery Plan for the Local Children’s Partnership Page 28 of 58
  28. 28. Section Two: Example Delivery Plan Local Target(s) Priority What? Who? How? Success Measures Baseline 09/10 10/11 11/12 CYPP priority 1: reducing the incidence and impact of poverty on the achievement and life chances of children and young people CYPP Achievement gap 49.9% 1A between pupils eligible (Nov 2009) for free school meals and their peers achieving the expected level at KS4 (NI 102b) CYPP Increase the 0.0% 1B percentage of care (Nov 2009) leavers in suitable accommodation (NI 147) Local Priority 1: LP 1A CYPP priority 2: securing children and young people’s physical, spiritual, social, emotional and mental health, promoting healthy lifestyles and reducing inequalities CYPP Increase the To be 2A percentage of children established Hampshire Children’s Trust - Delivery Plan for the Local Children’s Partnership Page 29 of 58
  29. 29. Local Target(s) Priority What? Who? How? Success Measures Baseline 09/10 10/11 11/12 CYPP priority 1: reducing the incidence and impact of poverty on the achievement and life chances of children and young people and young people’s participation in sporting opportunities (NI 57) Local Priority 2: LP 2A CYPP priority 3: providing opportunities to learn that raise children and young people’s aspirations, encouraging excellence and enable them to enjoy and achieve beyond their expectation CYPP Increase percentage of 78.4% 3A pupils achieving level 4 (Nov 2009) or above in English and Maths at KS2 (NI 73) CYPP Increase percentage of 53.7% 3B pupils achieving five or (Nov 2009) more A*-C grades at GCSE including English and Maths (NI 75) CYPP Increase the 78% 3C percentage of (Nov 2009) secondary schools Hampshire Children’s Trust - Delivery Plan for the Local Children’s Partnership Page 30 of 58
  30. 30. Local Target(s) Priority What? Who? How? Success Measures Baseline 09/10 10/11 11/12 CYPP priority 1: reducing the incidence and impact of poverty on the achievement and life chances of children and young people judged as having good or outstanding standards of behaviour (NI 86) CYPP Increase percentage of 77.3% 3D pupils progressing two (Nov 2009) levels in Maths between KS1 and KS2 (NI 94) CYPP Increase percentage of 50.0% 3E children in care (Nov 2009) achieving level 4 in English at KS2 (NI 99) CYPP Increase percentage of 25.4% 3F looked after children (Nov 2009) reaching level 4 in Maths at KS2 (NI 100) CYPP Increase percentage of 0.0% 3G children in care (Nov 2009) achieving five or more A*-C grades at GCSE including English and Hampshire Children’s Trust - Delivery Plan for the Local Children’s Partnership Page 31 of 58
  31. 31. Local Target(s) Priority What? Who? How? Success Measures Baseline 09/10 10/11 11/12 CYPP priority 1: reducing the incidence and impact of poverty on the achievement and life chances of children and young people Maths (NI 101) Local Priority 3: LP 3A CYPP priority 4: ensuring that children and young people are safe and feel safe, enabling them to build resilience and personal confidence CYPP Increase percentage of 61.9% 4A initial assessments for (Nov 2009) children’s social care carried out within 7 working days of referral (NI 59) CYPP Increase percentage of 76.3% 4B core assessments (Nov 2009) completed within 35 working days of their commencement (NI 60) CYPP Increase the stability of 56.3% 4C placements of looked (Nov 2009) after children: length of placement (NI 63) Hampshire Children’s Trust - Delivery Plan for the Local Children’s Partnership Page 32 of 58
  32. 32. Local Target(s) Priority What? Who? How? Success Measures Baseline 09/10 10/11 11/12 CYPP priority 1: reducing the incidence and impact of poverty on the achievement and life chances of children and young people Local Priority 4: LP 4A CYPP priority 5: providing vocational, leisure and recreational activities that provide opportunities for children and young people to experience success and make a positive contribution CYPP Reduce the percentage 5.5% 5A of young people within (Nov 2009) the Youth Justice system receiving a conviction in court who are sentenced to custody (NI 43) CYPP Increase the 66.7% 5B percentage of young (Nov 2009) offenders’ engagement in suitable education, employment and training (NI 45) CYPP Increase percentage of 90.63% 5C young offenders (Nov 2009) access to suitable accommodation (NI 46) Hampshire Children’s Trust - Delivery Plan for the Local Children’s Partnership Page 33 of 58
  33. 33. Local Target(s) Priority What? Who? How? Success Measures Baseline 09/10 10/11 11/12 CYPP priority 1: reducing the incidence and impact of poverty on the achievement and life chances of children and young people CYPP Increase percentage of 0.0% 5D care leavers in (Nov 2009) education, employment or training (NI 148) Local Priority 5: LP 5A CYPP priority 6: removing barriers to access, participation and achievement and not tolerating discrimination and abuse CYPP Increase percentage of 55.0% 6A schools providing (Nov 2009) access to extended services (NI 88) Local Priority 6: LA 6A Hampshire Children’s Trust - Delivery Plan for the Local Children’s Partnership Page 34 of 58
  34. 34. Appendix One: Local Children’s Partnership membership and contact details Membership Contact Hampshire Children’s Trust - Delivery Plan for the Local Children’s Partnership Page 35 of 58
  35. 35. Hampshire Children’s Trust - Delivery Plan for the Local Children’s Partnership Page 36 of 58
  36. 36. Appendix Two: Links to other plans and strategies Hampshire Children’s Trust - Delivery Plan for the Local Children’s Partnership Page 37 of 58
  37. 37. Hampshire Children’s Trust - Delivery Plan for the Local Children’s Partnership Page 38 of 58
  38. 38. Appendix Three: Glossary Term Definition Hampshire Children’s Trust - Delivery Plan for the Local Children’s Partnership Page 39 of 58
  39. 39. Appendix 4 Hampshire Children’s Trust performance management structure Annual timetable Annual review of Needs Hampshire’s for reports to Hampshire’s assessment Children and Hampshire Hampshire Children and and Young People’s Children’s Trust Children’s Trust Young People’s consultation Plan Board Plan Needs Twice-yearly assessment Local delivery reports to Local Annual self- Local Children’s and plans Children’s assessment Partnerships consultation Partnership Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 40 of 58
  40. 40. Appendix 5 Template for Local Children’s Partnership annual self- assessment This template should be completed on an annual basis by the Local Children’s Partnership, in conjunction with the appointed Children’s Services’ District Manager. The template should be completed between April and May, providing an assessment of the effectiveness of the partnership over the last financial year (1 April to 31 March). The template should be completed in conjunction with the April review of progress against the local delivery plan, which should also be submitted with the completed self-assessment. The purpose of the self-assessment is to: • Evaluate progress against the priorities and actions in the local delivery plan (and, therefore, the contribution of the Local Children’s Partnership to delivery of the county Children and Young People’s Plan); • Provide evidence to assess how the Local Children’s Partnership is improving on an annual basis; • Identify the Partnership’s key strengths and areas for improvement and/or development; • Contribute towards Comprehensive Area Assessment judgements on the effectiveness of Hampshire Children’s Trust and the annual Ofsted grading of Hampshire County Council’s Children’s Services Department. Completed evaluations and updated local delivery plans (showing progress against priorities/activities) should be submitted to Hampshire County Council Children’s Services Department Performance and Planning Team by 30 April 2010. The self-assessment template is based on five key questions, designed to assess the extent to which the Local Children’s Partnership meets the: • five essential features of a Children’s Trust (Children’s Trust: Statutory guidance on inter-agency co-operation to improve well-being of children and young people, DCSF 2008); • specific responsibilities of Local Children’s Partnerships (as established in the Hampshire Children’s Trust Performance Management Framework); • performance standards for members of Local Children’s Partnerships (as established in the Hampshire Children’s Trust Performance Management Framework). Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 41 of 58
  41. 41. Guidance The template is in four parts. Part A: Information on the Local Children’s Partnership This section is used to gather general information about the Local Children’s Partnership and the area it serves. Part B: The five key questions (based on the five essential features of a Children’s Trust) 1 How has the Local Children’s Partnership developed and promoted a child and family centred, outcome led vision for all children and young people? (including progress against the local delivery plan) 2 Does the Local Children’s Partnership have robust arrangements for inter-agency governance in place, with effective links to the Hampshire Children’s Trust Board? 3 How has the Local Children’s Partnership pooled or aligned budgets and developed joint commissioning opportunities? 4 How does the Local Children’s Partnership enable effective joint working sustained by shared language and processes? 5 How effective is the Local Children’s Partnership in developing and promoting integrated front line delivery organised around the child, young person or family rather than professional or institutional boundaries? For each key question, the Local Children’s Partnership and District Manager are required to provide a brief evaluation of how the partnership meets requirements. This should be supported by an outline of available evidence. Finally, those completing the template will need to enter a ‘grade’ for each area of focus – a straightforward judgement of how well the partnership meets requirements. The four point grading scale is outlined below. Grades Performs The Local Children’s Partnership significantly exceeds excellently minimum requirements: • There is strong evidence that the Partnership is improving outcomes for local children and young people, particularly the most vulnerable • A local delivery plan is in place and contains ambitious and realistic priorities which reflect local need and have been identified in partnership with local children, young people and families • Targets are met or exceeded Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 42 of 58
  42. 42. • Leadership is active, visible and effective, with good links to the Hampshire Children’s Trust Board • Communication is timely, effective and involves children, young people, families and partners • The views of children, young people and their families routinely contributes to planning and evaluation • All relevant local partners are engaged and working together to integrate services for children and young people • The Partnership has facilitated improvements in service design or delivery • Information sharing and data collection systems are excellent, with clear evidence of regular open and appropriate exchange • There is strong progress towards aligned resources and joint commissioning, with good value for money • The Partnership has excellent prospects for further improvement Performs The Local Children’s Partnership exceeds minimum well requirements: • There is evidence that the Partnership is improving outcomes for local children and young people, particularly the most vulnerable • A local delivery plan is in place and contains priorities which reflect local need and have been identified in partnership with local children, young people and families • Almost all targets are met • Leadership is mostly effective, with the required links to the Hampshire Children’s Trust Board in place • Communication involves children, young people, families and partners • The views of children, young people and their families are sought in some planning and evaluation activities • All relevant local partners are engaged and working together to integrate services for children and young people • The Partnership has identified improvements in service design or delivery • Information sharing and data collection systems are in place, with evidence of exchange in line with the Hampshire Children’s Trust Protocol • There is some progress towards aligned resources and joint commissioning, with funds allocated to activities most likely to be effective • The Partnership has good prospects for further improvement Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 43 of 58
  43. 43. Performs The Local Children’s Partnership meets minimum adequately requirements: • There is some evidence that the Partnership is improving outcomes for local children and young people, including the most vulnerable • A local delivery plan has been developed and contains priorities which reflect local need and have been identified in partnership with local children, young people and families • Targets are mostly met • Leadership is mostly effective, with the required links to the Hampshire Children’s Trust Board in place • Some communication is in place, but needs strengthening • The views of children, young people and their families are sought only when developing the local delivery plan • Membership meets minimum specified requirements, with some partners working together to integrate services • Partnership members are mostly compliant with Hampshire Children’s Trust Information Sharing Protocol and Operational Agreement • Local resource allocation reflects priorities, with additional resources allocated where necessary Performs The Local Children’s Partnership does not meet minimum poorly requirements: • There is not sufficient evidence that the Partnership has improved outcomes for local children and young people • The local delivery plan does not meet requirements, as established by the Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust, and does not take sufficient account of those whose circumstances make them vulnerable • Targets are not met • Performance management by the Partnership is ineffective • Links to the Hampshire Children’s Trust Board are ineffective • Communication between Partnership members is ineffective • There is no mechanism for routinely collecting the views of children, young people and their families • Membership meets minimum specified requirements • Partnership members are not compliant with the Hampshire Children’s Trust Information Sharing Protocol and Operational Agreement • Local resource allocation does not sufficiently follow priorities and no work has taken place to align budgets • Local commissioning is not developed and/or ineffective Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 44 of 58
  44. 44. Part C: Summary of key strengths and areas for improvement and/or development The key strengths and areas for improvement and/or development identified through the evaluation process should be transferred to this summary table. Actions to address identified areas for improvement and/or development should be included in the local delivery plan at the point of the next review/refresh. Part D: Summary of grades (including overall grade) Transfer the grades allocated for each key question during the evaluation process and determine an overall annual grade. Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 45 of 58
  45. 45. Part A: Information on the Local Children’s Partnership Name of the Local Children’s Partnership Name of Chair Contact details District Manager Contact details Membership Date template completed Signed by Chair Signed by District Manager Date received by Performance and Planning Team Delivery plan publication date (incl. link) Last meeting date and link to papers Number and name of schools in the area Number and name of children’s centres in the area Brief description of the main characteristics of the area (including number of 0-19 year olds) Details of early intervention and prevention services co-ordinated by the Partnership Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 46 of 58
  46. 46. Part B: The five key questions Key question 1: How has the Local Children’s Partnership developed and promoted a child and family centred, outcome led vision for all children and young people? (including progress against the local delivery plan) Provide a short evaluation of how the partnership meets this requirement Areas of focus: Evaluation Outline of supporting evidence Grade (a) How far does the Local Children’s Partnership focus on improving outcomes for local children and young people? Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 47 of 58
  47. 47. Key question 1: How has the Local Children’s Partnership developed and promoted a child and family centred, outcome led vision for all children and young people? (including progress against the local delivery plan) Provide a short evaluation of how the partnership meets this requirement Areas of focus: Evaluation Outline of supporting evidence Grade • The partnership has a detailed level of understanding of outcomes for children and young people within the area, including needs assessment • There is a focus on the needs of local communities and the partnership is clear about what it has to achieve for local children and young people • A local delivery plan has been developed, which outlines the contribution of partnership members to improving outcomes • The local plan clearly identifies how it will enable a reduction in the gaps in outcomes between the most vulnerable and the majority of children • The partnership effectively monitors and manages performance against the local delivery plan (please include a summary of progress against priorities) • Local targets take account of equalities and disabilities legislation • The partnership knows whether outcomes for local children and young people are improving Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 48 of 58
  48. 48. Key question 1: How has the Local Children’s Partnership developed and promoted a child and family centred, outcome led vision for all children and young people? (including progress against the local delivery plan) Provide a short evaluation of how the partnership meets this requirement Areas of focus: Evaluation Outline of supporting evidence Grade (b) What are the roles of the partners in delivering improvement? • The partnership ensures that local delivery plan priorities are clearly defined and consistent with other local strategies • The partnership uses shared performance information to support decisions • Roles, functions and responsibilities for achieving outcomes are clearly defined, agreed and understood by the partnership and wider stakeholders (c) How does the partnership effectively consult, engage with and involve key stakeholders? • The partnership successfully identifies, and works with, the key stakeholders in improving outcomes for local children and young people • The views of local communities and voluntary organisations are represented effectively • The partnership has strategies for consulting, engaging with and involving local children, young people and their families in direction setting, decision making and Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 49 of 58
  49. 49. Key question 1: How has the Local Children’s Partnership developed and promoted a child and family centred, outcome led vision for all children and young people? (including progress against the local delivery plan) Provide a short evaluation of how the partnership meets this requirement Areas of focus: Evaluation Outline of supporting evidence Grade challenge • The partnership demonstrates its accountability to partners and the local children and young people it represents (please include how the partnership involves children and young people in reviewing progress against the local delivery plan) Overall grade for key question 1: Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 50 of 58
  50. 50. Key question 2: Does the Local Children’s Partnership have robust arrangements for inter-agency governance in place, with effective links to the Hampshire Children’s Trust Board? Provide a short evaluation of how the partnership meets this requirement Areas of focus: Evaluation Outline of supporting evidence Grade (a) Does the partnership fulfil reporting requirements to Hampshire Children’s Trust Board? • The partnership is represented at all meetings of the Local Children’s Partnership Chairs’ Group • The partnership requests support from the Children’s Trust Board, as and when required (b) Does the partnership meet requirements for the core membership of Local Children’s Partnerships? • There is evidence that networks of local partners have been strengthened through the work of the partnership • Partnership agendas, minutes and supporting papers are available to members, wider stakeholders and the public (c) How does the partnership manage risks? • Partnership members have clear standards for service delivery, which are regularly monitored • There are robust systems for identifying, monitoring and mitigating against risk • The partnership has identified any Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 51 of 58
  51. 51. Key question 2: Does the Local Children’s Partnership have robust arrangements for inter-agency governance in place, with effective links to the Hampshire Children’s Trust Board? Provide a short evaluation of how the partnership meets this requirement Areas of focus: Evaluation Outline of supporting evidence Grade risks to delivery of targets in the local delivery plan (please provide a summary) (d) How effectively does the partnership monitor contracts? • All contracts have an agreed specification that includes outcome measures and are monitored at least annually • The partnership adheres to Hampshire Children’s Trust commissioning strategy/framework Overall grade for key question 2: Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 52 of 58
  52. 52. Key question 3: How has the Local Children’s Partnership pooled or aligned budgets and developed joint commissioning opportunities? Provide a short evaluation of how the partnership meets this requirement Areas of focus: Evaluation Outline of supporting evidence Grade (a) How does the partnership oversee the effective use of resources? Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 53 of 58
  53. 53. Key question 3: How has the Local Children’s Partnership pooled or aligned budgets and developed joint commissioning opportunities? Provide a short evaluation of how the partnership meets this requirement Areas of focus: Evaluation Outline of supporting evidence Grade • There are clear and robust systems for agreeing and monitoring the allocation of resources to meet local delivery plan priorities, which has involved mapping resources available for children and young people’s services in the area • The partnership regularly reviews total local spending on children and young people, to identify opportunities for improving value for money • Improvements in local services for children and young people have arisen from aligning or pooling budgets • Partnership members report on the allocation and impact of all budgets and resources spent on children and young people’s services in the area • The partnership adheres to the Children’s Trust Board policy on the alignment or pooling of budgets • The partnership seeks to influence the allocation of resources to reduce gaps in outcomes and achieve local priorities • Partners Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Performance have identified and made Page 54 of 58
  54. 54. Key question 3: How has the Local Children’s Partnership pooled or aligned budgets and developed joint commissioning opportunities? Provide a short evaluation of how the partnership meets this requirement Areas of focus: Evaluation Outline of supporting evidence Grade Overall grade for key question 3: Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 55 of 58
  55. 55. Key question 4: How does the Local Children’s Partnership enable effective joint working sustained by shared language and processes? Provide a short evaluation of how the partnership meets this requirement Areas of focus: Evaluation Outline of supporting evidence Grade (a) Has the partnership moved to promote and co-ordinate early intervention and prevention activities in the area? • Partnership members participate in integrated processes such as the Common Assessment Framework (b) Has the partnership facilitated integrated working opportunities, including workforce development? • Staff have a clear understanding of their role in delivering the priorities of the local delivery plan • Partnership members work together to equip staff with the relevant skills to deliver good services to children and young people as well as their families and carers • The partnership improves its members’ individual and collective performance, knowledge and skills Overall grade for key question 4: Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 56 of 58
  56. 56. Key question 5: How effective is the Local Children’s Partnership in developing and promoting integrated front line delivery organised around the child, young person or family rather than professional or institutional boundaries? Provide a short evaluation of how the partnership meets this requirement Areas of focus: Evaluation Outline of supporting evidence Grade (a) How does the partnership support local capacity building and development? • The partnership has strengthened or established transparent and robust local networks to enable effective integrated working across children’s services in the area Overall grade for key question 5: Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 57 of 58
  57. 57. Part C: Summary of key strengths and areas for development and/or improvement Key strengths Areas for development and/or improvement Part D: Summary of grades Key question Grade How has the Local Children’s Partnership developed and promoted a child and family centred, outcome led vision for all children and young people? Does the Local Children’s Partnership have robust arrangements for inter-agency governance in place, with effective links to the Hampshire Children’s Trust Board? How has the Local Children’s Partnership pooled or aligned budgets and developed joint commissioning opportunities? How does the Local Children’s Partnership enable effective joint working sustained by shared language and processes? How effective is the Local Children’s Partnership in developing and promoting integrated front line delivery organised around the child, young person or family rather than professional or institutional boundaries? Overall grade: Performance Management Framework for Hampshire Children’s Trust Page 58 of 58

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