Critical Issues in Public Health Leadership: Succession Management and  Developing Your Leadership Pipeline NACDD General ...
Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Purpose: To assist senior public health managers in dev...
Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute <ul><li>Objectives: </li></ul><ul><li>Have a shared und...
Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute State health agencies are reporting over 50% of their p...
Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute How critical is the aging of the workforce in your orga...
Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Developing a Culture of Succession: Key Elements and St...
Developing a Culture of Succession Key Elements <ul><li>Organizational Strategic Plan- vision, mission, context, trends, c...
The Levels in Succession Planning The Whole Organization The Programs The Individuals Center for Health Leadership and Pra...
Continuum of Succession Processes Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Replacement planning ...
Our Focus :  Succession management-combining succession planning and leadership development of high potentials (leadership...
Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute <ul><li>Project leadership requirements </li></ul><ul><...
Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Succession Management is  a long term strategic initiat...
Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute It helps your organization answer key questions: 1. Who...
Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute <ul><li>Development of a Succession Management Plan </l...
Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Phase 1: Finalize Scope and Approach Phase 4: Implement...
Succession Management Planning Phase I <ul><li>Step 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure top level sponsorship </li></ul><ul><li>Ste...
Succession Management Planning Phase II <ul><li>Step 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Analyze retirement data </li></ul><ul><li>Step 2 ...
Workforce Analysis Tools Retirement Analysis Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Retirement...
Workforce Analysis Tools Gap Analysis Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Gap Analysis for ...
<ul><li>Developing your Leadership Bench: </li></ul><ul><li>Identification and Leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Development of...
Identification of High Potentials <ul><li>Who are high potentials?  Individuals who at various point in their careers are ...
Identification of High Potentials Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute <ul><li>are results d...
Development of High Potentials <ul><li>Examples include : </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership development programs-knowledge, ski...
Training & Development   Generational Perspectives Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute 2008...
State and Regional Public Health Leadership Institutes www.heartlandcenters.slu.edu/nln / Center for Health Leadership and...
State-Level Discussions <ul><li>What is the situation in our state? </li></ul><ul><li>What are our priority needs? </li></...
Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute For Additional Information Contact: Carol Woltring, Exe...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Critical Issues in Public Health Nutrition Leadership: Succession ...

862 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
862
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Critical Issues in Public Health Nutrition Leadership: Succession ...

  1. 1. Critical Issues in Public Health Leadership: Succession Management and Developing Your Leadership Pipeline NACDD General Member Call August 28, 2008 Presented by Carol Woltring, Executive Director Center for Health Leadership and Practice Public Health Institute Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute
  2. 2. Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Purpose: To assist senior public health managers in developing a “culture of succession” and succession management strategies in their organizations in order to recruit, retain and develop management and leadership capacity to meet future needs.
  3. 3. Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute <ul><li>Objectives: </li></ul><ul><li>Have a shared understanding about the workforce </li></ul><ul><li>demographics in public health leadership and </li></ul><ul><li>their impact on the need for succession management. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the key elements of a “culture of succession” and </li></ul><ul><li>succession management related to your </li></ul><ul><li>organization’s/program’s current activities and needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify key steps in succession planning and next steps </li></ul><ul><li>for you/your organization/your state. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify one or more leadership development strategies </li></ul><ul><li>that you would like to initiate in your state or region. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute State health agencies are reporting over 50% of their public health workforce is eligible for retirement over the next five years (2008-2012) -State Public Health Worker Survey Results ASTHO, 2007
  5. 5. Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute How critical is the aging of the workforce in your organization/state?
  6. 6. Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Developing a Culture of Succession: Key Elements and Steps in Succession Management and Planning
  7. 7. Developing a Culture of Succession Key Elements <ul><li>Organizational Strategic Plan- vision, mission, context, trends, customer needs, goals and strategic directions </li></ul><ul><li>II. Succession Plan </li></ul><ul><li>A. Workforce – Needs and Gap Analysis/Timeline (focus is usually critical positions and top management positions – can include a broader focus as well) </li></ul><ul><li>B. Identification of a pool of high potential staff to develop </li></ul><ul><li>Staff Development and Retention Strategies </li></ul><ul><li>A. Training – Technical/Professional skills/ Management and Leadership skills </li></ul><ul><li>B. Coaching and mentoring </li></ul><ul><li>C. Career development/portfolio development </li></ul><ul><li>IV. Knowledge Transfer – ongoing and urgent </li></ul>Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Organizational Strategic Plan Succession Plan Staff Development & Retention Strategies Knowledge Transfer
  8. 8. The Levels in Succession Planning The Whole Organization The Programs The Individuals Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute
  9. 9. Continuum of Succession Processes Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Replacement planning Succession planning Succession management Identification of successors yes yes yes Development of successors little or none yes yes (Talent Pool) Managerial levels top two or three top two or three all Recruitment and Selection ? ? yes Retention ? ? yes
  10. 10. Our Focus : Succession management-combining succession planning and leadership development of high potentials (leadership pipeline/talent pool) Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute
  11. 11. Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute <ul><li>Project leadership requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Identify a pool of high potential candidates </li></ul><ul><li>Develop leadership competencies in those candidates </li></ul><ul><li>through intentional learning experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Select leaders from among the pool of potential leaders </li></ul><ul><li>The focus is typically successors for the top management levels of the organization. It is a robust approach that requires an organizational culture that sees the value of talent development and understands how to integrate that into daily operations. </li></ul>Succession Management is a deliberate and systemic effort to:
  12. 12. Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Succession Management is a long term strategic initiative that ensures that the right staff are in the right jobs at the right times. It ensures the continued effective performance of an organization by establishing a process to develop and replace key staff over time.
  13. 13. Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute It helps your organization answer key questions: 1. Who will move into this key position when _____ retires? 2. ______ could move into any one of these three director positions. If he/she accepts one, who will replace him/her? Is this the best position for ____’s skill set. 3. How do we keep ______ from leaving if he/she does not get his/her promotion? If your organization carries out succession management correctly, it will have talent pool of individuals prepared to step into management and other critical positions left vacant because of retirement and general attrition.
  14. 14. Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute <ul><li>Development of a Succession Management Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Identification of high potentials </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership development of high potentials </li></ul><ul><li>Other staff development activities </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge Transfer Strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Recruitment and Selection Strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Accountability - monitor progress and evaluate </li></ul>Succession Management includes:
  15. 15. Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Phase 1: Finalize Scope and Approach Phase 4: Implement and Evaluate the Plan Phase 2: Gather Data Phase 3: Develop the Succession Management Plan Analyze current context and finalize purpose and scope of plan and activities <ul><li>Obtain and analyze HR retirement data </li></ul><ul><li>Determine “hot spots” and “critical” positions </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct gap analysis and determine future needs </li></ul><ul><li>Priorities </li></ul><ul><li>Urgent issues </li></ul><ul><li>Longer range issues </li></ul><ul><li>Major Components: </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership Development System </li></ul><ul><li>Retention Strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Recruitment Strategies </li></ul>Start on X date A Succession Management Planning Model
  16. 16. Succession Management Planning Phase I <ul><li>Step 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure top level sponsorship </li></ul><ul><li>Step 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Understand your current situation </li></ul><ul><li>Step 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Identify your strategic direction and impact on current and future workforce needs - Implications for leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Step 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Determine the scope of your plan and activities </li></ul>Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute
  17. 17. Succession Management Planning Phase II <ul><li>Step 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Analyze retirement data </li></ul><ul><li>Step 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Determine “hot spots” </li></ul><ul><li>Step 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct gap analysis </li></ul>Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute
  18. 18. Workforce Analysis Tools Retirement Analysis Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Retirement Analysis for _________________________ Department/Division/Program Total 50-54 55-59 60+ Total 50-60+
  19. 19. Workforce Analysis Tools Gap Analysis Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Gap Analysis for _________________________ Projection for Need for: Job Title Program or location A Program or location B Program or location C Program or location D Today’s supply (date) Projections: Transfers or resignations Retirements Other separations (other job, dismissal, death) Future Supply (date) Future Demand (date) Gap to be filled
  20. 20. <ul><li>Developing your Leadership Bench: </li></ul><ul><li>Identification and Leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Development of High Potentials </li></ul>Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute
  21. 21. Identification of High Potentials <ul><li>Who are high potentials? Individuals who at various point in their careers are perceived to be potential successors to those at higher organizational levels. </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of learning is the key distinction between those who are high potentials and those who are not. Learning agility , as demonstrated by performance over time in a variety of assignments, is the best way to determine of an individual is a high potential. </li></ul>Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute
  22. 22. Identification of High Potentials Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute <ul><li>are results driven: have completed many challenging assignments </li></ul><ul><li>have people skills: influence, motivate, and work with a wide range of people </li></ul><ul><li>have mental ability: have street smarts and ask insightful questions </li></ul><ul><li>use integrated thinking: link ideas and understand the essence of problems </li></ul><ul><li>are flexible: adjust priorities, take risks, and embrace change </li></ul><ul><li>are energetic: get energy from work and energize others </li></ul><ul><li>have core technical skills </li></ul><ul><li>understand the organization’s mission, vision, goals, and objectives </li></ul>Generally high potential employees :
  23. 23. Development of High Potentials <ul><li>Examples include : </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership development programs-knowledge, skills, attributes </li></ul><ul><li>Network development </li></ul><ul><li>Exposure to senior management </li></ul><ul><li>Coaching </li></ul><ul><li>Mentoring </li></ul><ul><li>Self-Study and E-Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Job shadowing </li></ul><ul><li>Early involvement with strategic issues </li></ul><ul><li>Action learning – stretch assignments, cross-functional assignments, rotation, etc. </li></ul>Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute Blended learning is best with combination of classroom, training, on-the-job, and e-learning.
  24. 24. Training & Development Generational Perspectives Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute 2008 1900 - 1945 Traditionalists 1946-1964 Baby Boomers 1965 - 1981 Generation X 1982- 2000 Millennials “ I learned the hard way , you can too.” “ Train them too much and they might leave” “ The more they learn, the more they stay” “ Continuous learning is a way of life” <ul><li>School of hard knocks </li></ul><ul><li>Younger generation spoiled by too many choices </li></ul><ul><li>Training a perk and way to get ahead in the organization </li></ul><ul><li>Limit training or people will become too adept and leave the organization </li></ul><ul><li>Constantly developing a portfolio of skills so they can adapt to rapid change and/or a need to move on. </li></ul><ul><li>Expectation for on-going training ---no leveling off </li></ul><ul><li>Constant retooling to fit in to ever changing world and job market </li></ul>3% of Traditionalists left jobs because of a lack of training opportunities 15% of Boomers left jobs because of a lack of training opportunities 30% of Xers left jobs because of a lack of training opportunities TBD
  25. 25. State and Regional Public Health Leadership Institutes www.heartlandcenters.slu.edu/nln / Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute
  26. 26. State-Level Discussions <ul><li>What is the situation in our state? </li></ul><ul><li>What are our priority needs? </li></ul><ul><li>What can we start doing in the next year around succession planning? </li></ul><ul><li>What can we do about leadership development? </li></ul><ul><li>What are our next steps? </li></ul>Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute
  27. 27. Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute For Additional Information Contact: Carol Woltring, Executive Director Center for Health Leadership and Practice, Public Health Institute 510 285-5586 E Mail: [email_address]

×