Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
A SAMPLE OF
THE FUTURE 100
MENA TRENDS AND CHANGE TO WATCH IN 2017
1 00
A REPORT BY
INNOVATION GROUP MENA
Introduction
2INTRODUCTION THE FUTURE 100
Are you seeing the winds of change as much as we are? As we
look ahead to 2017, ...
Introduction
3INTRODUCTION THE FUTURE 100
Harried consumers are seeking new forms of escapism, fantasy and insight as
they...
51
60
61
70
71
80
81
90
91
100
01
10
11
20
21
30
31
40
41
50
Beauty Retail Health Lifestyle Luxury
Culture
Tech+
Innovatio...
01-10
Culture
Photo Credit: isow-wageningen.org
05
The New Spiritualist
Source: (1) ASDA’A Burson-Marsteller: Arab Youth Survey, 2016
Photo Credit: Thomas Barwick, Getty ...
11-20
Tech+Innovation
Photo Credit: University of Sheffield
1
5
A vibrant startup hub is shaping up in Palestine. In a natural
display of resilience, optimistic vanguards are innovat...
In addition to exceptional players that have already cemented their place in the
tech space like travel startup, Yamsafer,...
21-30
Travel+Hospitality
Eco-lodge Adrere Amellal, in Siwa, Egypt
The tourism industry is waking up to the growing spending power of
the Muslim traveler well beyond the Arab world, particu...
31-40
Brands+Marketing
Sarah’s Bag Psychedelia Collection
After an unending obsession with ultra-realism driven by
user-generated content, brands, influencers and retailers are
reco...
Top and Bottom: Sarah’s Bag Psychedelia collection
40
THE FUTURE 100 62BRANDS + MARKETING
Fantasy, fairytale and fictitious...
41-50
Food+Drink
Photo Credit: Sprinkle of Green
THE FUTURE 100 70
Nestle's Tummy Fish app
The Nestlé Healthy Kids Global Program, vows to build good
nutritional habits am...
4
6
THE FUTURE 100 71
46
FOOD + DRINK
Beyond the screen, brands are involving children in hands-on experiences to
educate ...
51-60
Beauty
Photo Credit: Prismologie
THE FUTURE 100 87
Abe & Jar's beard oil
Source: (1) Euromonitor International, 2015
With a ‘Menaissance’ knocking at our d...
5
8
THE FUTURE 100 88
Beau & Eve, Unisex skin care range
Beyond the uptake of ‘dude grooming’, the realization that beauty...
61-70
Retail
Kenzo Bus
THE FUTURE 100 98
Under Armour HealthBox
With the technology industry reaching new heights of cultural
influence, it’s stra...
THE FUTURE 100 99
‘Seven’, a subscription platform by Al Rifai Nuts
Closer to home, Al Rifai Nuts roastery recently launch...
71-80
Health
Electric Run, Dubai
THE FUTURE 100 110
Bulletproof, Brain Octane fuel
Nootropics: Powering Peak Performance
72
HEALTH
As the optimized nutriti...
81-90
Lifestyle
World Drone Prix Circuit, Dubai
THE FUTURE 100 132
Anxy magazine founded by Indhira Rojas
New Mental Health
86
LIFESTYLE
The stigma around mental health i...
91-100
Luxury
Jimmy Choo, ‘Pick and Choos’ collection
THE FUTURE 100 143
Bulgari Vault app for safekeeping valuable data
Data is the new Luxury
93
LUXURY
In an age that has bec...
THE FUTURE 100 144
psk series jewelry carrying personal data
93
LUXURY
In an effort that is perhaps more opportunistic tha...
Contact:
Mennah Ibrahim
MEA Director of the Innovation Group
J. Walter Thompson Intelligence
mennah.ibrahim@jwt.com
Editor...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Future 100 trends and change to watch in mena 2017 - Executive Summary

2,554 views

Published on

To download the full report please paste this link into your browser http://jwtmea.com/future100_2017

Published in: Business

Future 100 trends and change to watch in mena 2017 - Executive Summary

  1. 1. A SAMPLE OF THE FUTURE 100 MENA TRENDS AND CHANGE TO WATCH IN 2017 1 00 A REPORT BY INNOVATION GROUP MENA
  2. 2. Introduction 2INTRODUCTION THE FUTURE 100 Are you seeing the winds of change as much as we are? As we look ahead to 2017, markets are confident despite assumptions being shaken and narratives overturned. Amidst the massive shifts that are sure to follow, there’s never been a more important time for brands to keep tabs on forecasts and emerging consumer behaviors. The technology industry still continues to exercise enormous cultural and economic power, more so, now that the physical and digital words have officially collided, drawing us deeper into a Matrix-like realm. In “Civic Data” (#18), we look at how cities are becoming R&D labs, collecting and sharing open-source data in real time. Brands are vying for hearts and minds, overlaying virtual treasures into our physical world in “Gamified Tourism” (#28). Multireality experiences that blend online and real world experiences are emerging as the next canvas for futuristic storytelling, in “New Immersive Landscapes” (#34). Even in Beauty, connected technologies are making it easier for brands to adapt to individual needs via “Beauty Biometrics” (#60). Markets that have long been overlooked or misunderstood are about to get their due. Brands are finally addressing the large and growing disabled population in “Disability: Diversity’s New Frontier” (#31), and savvy Muslims are being targeted as the polycultural, influential and progressive group they are in “Futuristic Faithfuls” (#12). Marketers lavish attention on millennials and boomers, but what about generation X? “Xers: The Forgotten Generation” (#33). In “Just as you are”, brands are finally spotlighting images of women who look like their customers (#57). While “Senior Coolness” sees brands embracing seniors in the light of limitless possibilities, rather than declining abilities (#7). Last year saw society embracing topics that were previously taboo, and this year will bring entirely new industries centered around aspects of life that have been firmly reclaimed by consumers. “Age of the Single Lady” (#2) examines how the trend towards delayed marriage and parenthood is shaping a tribe of happily unmarried women. Shamanism and alternative healing are spilling into the mainstream, as people turn to anything that makes life easier to deal with, in “New Age Healing” (#76). In beauty, men are spearheading a shift, becoming “The New Beauty Consumer” (#58), while consumers are choosing to selectively edit bits of DNA towards miracle cures in “Gene Editing” (#71).
  3. 3. Introduction 3INTRODUCTION THE FUTURE 100 Harried consumers are seeking new forms of escapism, fantasy and insight as they navigate the stress and mundanity of everyday life in “Unreality” (#40). “Mystic Beauty” (#55) looks at young people adopting a knowing perspective on occult aesthetics, while “Fragrant Potions” asks why millennials are opting for scents with ‘meaning’ (#56). “Outdoor Explorers” (#81) finds unprecedented numbers of urbanites turning to the great outdoors for respite, while elsewhere, developers are creating bubbles of “Artificial Nature” (#94). Innovators are even turning their attention to the most universal form of escape in “Engineering the Snooze” (#74). Instagram, and now live-streaming culture, permeates all sectors. “Elemental Travel” (#23) looks at raw, exposed yet visually stunning places to stay the night. In “Nail Art” (#59), beauty trends move away from the practical toward the socially sharable, as salons retool around experience culture. “Glamping” (#98) – Glamorous camping – is rising as the antithesis of the gilded overdone classic hotel model. If there’s anything to be learned from this year, it’s that change comes rapidly, and often from unexpected places. While trends like “Inter-faith Friendships” (#9) and “Digital Palestine: Innovation Under Occupation” (#15) reflect a world inevitably shaped by political storms, trends such as “Everyone is a Chef” (#45) or “Indie Challengers” (#3) point to a future that’s propelled by immense creativity and the power of consumers. As more sectors embrace the unknown, it’s these forces that will drive industries forward. Dive in!
  4. 4. 51 60 61 70 71 80 81 90 91 100 01 10 11 20 21 30 31 40 41 50 Beauty Retail Health Lifestyle Luxury Culture Tech+ Innovation Food+ Drink Travel+ Hospitality Brands+ Marketing THE FUTURE 100CONTENTS
  5. 5. 01-10 Culture Photo Credit: isow-wageningen.org
  6. 6. 05 The New Spiritualist Source: (1) ASDA’A Burson-Marsteller: Arab Youth Survey, 2016 Photo Credit: Thomas Barwick, Getty Images via Huffington Post THE FUTURE 100CULTURE 10 As the grip of mainstream religion slackens, fringe faiths are starting to shape up in the region. Once the passion of the spiritual set, meditation, shamanism and alternative healing are spilling into the mainstream, as people look for anything that is functional and practical, that makes life easier to deal with. 52% of Arab youth agree to that religion plays too big of a role in society–a shift in attitude that is increasingly manifesting on the ground1 . In a move towards a more secular state, Jordan no longer considers the ‘statement of religion’ as a requirement on its national ID documents, as too has the University of Cairo for all student and faculty papers. Content of interest is also being reshuffled. According to Arab Weekly, Arab readers are losing interest in political literature – particularly those trying to make sense of the IS phenomenon – and shifting to more spiritual themes. Beyond this shifting religious landscape, the need to slow down, regain focus and reduce stress, is giving way to the desire to embrace a more mindful and measured pace of life, one that finds more meaning and consciousness in every moment. From Egypt’s Rou7 Festival to the Beirut Yoga Festival, the Arab world is becoming a utopia for free-spirited yogis. While fewer people are looking to religion for guidance and serenity in the traditional sense, this doesn’t mean they’ve stopped believing altogether. Data from our Females Tribes for the MENA report reveals that 20% of Arab women consider themselves “spiritual” and 10% already belong to or practice a “non-traditional” religion. While some are resorting to nowadays common practices like meditation and healing to find “meaning” in life, others are opening up to Eastern methods, shamanistic rituals or even mixing and matching religious and spiritual codes at will, to construct their own idea of faith. There’s also a more curious, self-aware and spiritually awakened cohort seeking even higher levels of enlightenment, dabbling in third-wave new-age practices, through crystals, astrology, sound baths, tarot and tapping. In Beirut, the House of Healing offers everything from Theta Healing, a spiritual philosophy with the aim of getting “closer to the Creator”, to Tarot, Palm and Numerology readings. Why it’s interesting: Spirituality associates naturally with wellness, health and even beauty. Meaning that marketers across categories should reassess their offerings and messaging through this lens, to provide spiritually rewarding experiences with a positive psychological and even physical impact.
  7. 7. 11-20 Tech+Innovation Photo Credit: University of Sheffield
  8. 8. 1 5 A vibrant startup hub is shaping up in Palestine. In a natural display of resilience, optimistic vanguards are innovating in the face of adversity, overcoming metaphorical barriers; power cuts, weak internet infrastructure and political restrictions, to name a few and setting up businesses against all odds. Due to the blockade in place since 2007, Gaza’s exports, according to World Bank’s Country Director for West Bank and Gaza, Steen Lau Jorgensen, ‘virtually disappeared’ and the manufacturing sector has shrunk by as much as 60%. Young Palestinians are increasingly stepping in where Government is unable to tread and charting the path for progress in areas that lack it the most. Some examples include Mashvisor, a real estate platform that optimizes the rental performance of investment properties. Fadfid, a virtual platform for connecting with licensed psychologists across the Arab world and Wirez, a marketplace that connects talented video storytellers with media broadcasters and publishers. “I think we’re witnessing the start of something huge in Palestine: becoming self-sufficient on our own accord without relying on occupied powers or unprincipled leaders,” says Christina Ganim, a Ramallah-based entrepreneur. “I think starting a business here is in itself a political act.” There are also startups investing in hardware; Insolito, a multi-purpose fitness tracker that also makes emergency calls using a sneaker insole and BoldKnot, a stylish top-up battery pack, described as “the world’s fastest iPhone charger… in a keychain”. Kids working at Gaza Sky Geeks Digital Palestine: Innovation under Occupation 15 THE FUTURE 100 24TECH+INNOVATION
  9. 9. In addition to exceptional players that have already cemented their place in the tech space like travel startup, Yamsafer, hailed by TechCrunch as the Booking.com of the Middle East, Webteb, a digital health portal, and Batuta, a travel research site. “The people we hire are hungrier than people you would have hired in Dubai, Jordan or elsewhere,” said Faris Zaher, Co-Founder & CEO at Yamsafer, which recently closed a $3.5m funding round in one of the biggest venture capital deals the region has seen. Catalyzing the startup boom is the abundance of accelerators, incubators and VC funds, like the Fast Forward accelerator in Ramallah and Gaza Sky Geeks in Gaza. Ibtikar Fund, the country’s biggest startup investment fund, officially launched this year in Ramallah, a key development in the nation’s growing startup ecosystem and its stakeholders. “There is a vacuum in the regional entrepreneurship ecosystem preventing many startups from bridging the early stages of their lifecycle where they are cash negative. Ibtikar is designed to solve this problem in Palestine.” said Ibtikar COO Ambar Amleh. Hackathons like the AngelHack Gaza competition, startup events like Startup Weekend Gaza for kidpreneurs and coworking spaces such as the Work Factory are no longer a rare occurrence. For as long as they are unable to self-govern, entrepreneurship provides a sense of economic independence, “a way of distancing themselves from Israeli influence as well as dependency on foreign aid.” as expressed by Quartz. Why it’s interesting: With 3G set to launch this year, innovation is ripe for the taking, “Palestinians haven’t been exposed to 3G yet, so they don’t understand the potential,” said Ambar Amleh, a venture capitalist at the Ibtikar fund, “Once they have 3G to play with, you’ll see a lot more apps being developed here,” she said. “Think about it: how could someone have imagined Google if they didn’t know what the internet was?”. In a nutshell, the flood of entrepreneurship is just beginning. Virtual therapy platform, Fadfid 15 TECH+INNOVATION
  10. 10. 21-30 Travel+Hospitality Eco-lodge Adrere Amellal, in Siwa, Egypt
  11. 11. The tourism industry is waking up to the growing spending power of the Muslim traveler well beyond the Arab world, particularly in Asia and Europe, which account for 87% of the entire market1 . Muslim business travel is expected to be a $22 billion market by 2020, while Muslim travel overall will be worth $220 billion, according to an October 2016 report by Mastercard and CrescentRating. More than half of Muslim business travelers spent in excess of $2,000 per trip, according to the report. Hospitality brands are first to take the lead, even repackaging ‘halal’ for younger audiences. Abu-Dhabi based Jannah Hotels and Resorts, a luxury halal hotel operator, has plans to introduce BedoInn, a Millennial-friendly budget brand, promising modern facilities, the availability of lifestyle-themed rooms for fitness enthusiasts and gamers and a commitment to ethical and sustainable practices - one of the fundamental pillars of ‘halal’. Asian destinations too, are reaching out to Muslim travelers. Thailand’s first halal hotel, the four-star Al Meroz, opened recently to cater to Thailand’s growing numbers of Middle Eastern visitors, including UAE citizens who come for medical treatments. In Japan, Muslim-friendly tour operators report rising business, and the Syariah Hotel Fujisan opened in July 2016 to host Muslim tourists visiting the area near Mount Fuji. With this momentum, new services are emerging to accommodate the needs of this growing demographic, including Shariah-compliant airlines, such as UK’s Firnas Al Meroz Hotel Source: (1) Mastercard and CrescentRating, Muslim Business Traveler Insights 2016, 2016 Halal Tourism 29 THE FUTURE 100 45TRAVEL+HOSPITALITY Airways; Muslim-friendly booking platforms such as Malaysia’s Tripfez; Halal P2P accommodation such as UK’s Book Halal Homes and many more. Thailand recently launched an app to help Muslim travelers find halal-friendly restaurants, and Taiwan’s capital, Taipei, has provided prayer rooms at the city’s main train station. Seven new halal restaurants opened in the city during 2016, city tourism commissioner Yu-Yen Chien told Malay Mail Online. Closer to home, Mecca is gearing up to become a destination for MICE travel in Saudi Arabia, drawing a rising number of local companies and government bodies looking to combine their business trips with Umrah pilgrimage, as revealed by Saudi Gazette. Why it’s interesting: Tourism is the most recent sector to align itself with the needs of Muslim consumers, following recent interest in Muslim-friendly fashion and cosmetics. Hospitality brands should make sure their offerings suit this group, or risk losing out on the segment.
  12. 12. 31-40 Brands+Marketing Sarah’s Bag Psychedelia Collection
  13. 13. After an unending obsession with ultra-realism driven by user-generated content, brands, influencers and retailers are reconnecting with the imagination. “Brands that put artistry and vision at the forefront again will be the ones that capture the most attention,” says Pam Grossman, director of visual trends at Getty Images. Surreal imagery that references otherworldly, supernatural or psychedelic scenarios are chiming with a desire for psychological escapism. To launch the new ‘LSD-inspired’ collection of his Kojak brand, Egyptian fashion designer Mohanad Kojak, teamed up with art director Ikon Chiba to introduce ‘Trippin’, a fashion film that chronicles the blurry stages of a delirious drug trip. "We thought this was some heavy stuff simple folk wouldn’t get, but they were totally getting it” says Chiba, commenting on the final stage of the film, which according to him, is all about 'Morphing into Euphoria'. "It's all about having a good time at the end. It's trippy." Lebanon’s Sarah’s Bag’s latest collection, ‘Psychedelia’, charts a journey of magic and mindfulness, taking inspiration from the vividly colorful and glamorous creative culture of the soul-searching days of the rebellious 60s era. Trippy-chic styles include the ‘Mandala’ clutch with the kaleidoscopic pattern recreated in pearl and wood inlay, the ‘Aura’ bag made of expanding layers of plexi in vibrant colors and the ‘Awareness’ piece featuring the Third Eye embroidered over a printed silk-blend background. Top: Mohanad Kojak’s ‘LSD inspired’ Trippin campaign Bottom: Level Shoe District’s cosmos-inspired display Unreality 40 THE FUTURE 100 61BRANDS + MARKETING
  14. 14. Top and Bottom: Sarah’s Bag Psychedelia collection 40 THE FUTURE 100 62BRANDS + MARKETING Fantasy, fairytale and fictitious references are increasingly being used to create more engaging retail experiences. Dolce & Gabbana’s AW’16 launch event in Beirut, embraced famous fairytale themes from Beauty and the Beast, Cinderella and Snow White. A life-sized red apple tree, clocks ready to strike midnight and a large fairytale book recounting the love story of D&G’s princess and prince were the backdrop for tinsel-like dresses and whimsical accessories fit for a modern-day princess. The cosmos, too, is becoming a source of inspiration for marketers, with outer space, the planets and galaxies lending their astral allure. The mystical appeal of the stars and space transformed the Women’s Designer area at Dubai’s Level Shoe District into a cosmic world with twilight skies, glowing constellations and shooting stars, in addition to gracing the Men’s Designer area with inspiration from natural crystals and rocks. The opportunity to use the vocabulary of the spiritual and astrological worlds has not been missed, by brands keen to offer enlightenment and escapism. “In this day and age of uncertainty and shallow connectivity, people are craving something deeper, something that centers them,” says Grossman. Why it’s interesting: The digital world has created a precociously wise and cynical generation to whom “unknowing” is becoming increasingly attractive. For millennials struggling to make sense of their place in the world, there is a world that doesn’t make sense—but it doesn’t matter because it’s not real. Unreality is the natural antidote to the increasingly clichéd themes of honesty and authenticity, and appeals to those who want something beyond the evident and explainable.
  15. 15. 41-50 Food+Drink Photo Credit: Sprinkle of Green
  16. 16. THE FUTURE 100 70 Nestle's Tummy Fish app The Nestlé Healthy Kids Global Program, vows to build good nutritional habits among school-age children around the world, shaping them into the healthy adults of tomorrow. With child obesity rates at an all-time high, brands are getting creative to promote better eating choices among young consumers early on, arming them with healthy habits to last a lifetime. Among children, the prevalence of overweight and obesity in the Middle East rose to 25% in 20131 , and according to the World Health Organization (WHO), 30% of obese preschoolers and 40% of obese school children become obese adults, making ‘food-ed.’ all the more crucial. Gamification is increasingly being leveraged to drive healthy food habits among youngsters. Nestlé’s ’United for Healthier Kids’ movement created ‘Tummyfish’, a storybook and app to encourage kids to drink more water. By tracking their child’s liquid intake, parents steer ‘Tummyfish’s’ emotions and tummy-habitat, rewarding good habits by unlocking toys and mini-games. Similarly, The Magic Meal app by Syrian clinical nutritionist, Dr. Yara Radwan, teaches kids about healthy eating through the adventures of three characters, who overcome challenges thanks to super powers gleaned from eating healthy lunches. Grow Them Young 46 FOOD + DRINK
  17. 17. 4 6 THE FUTURE 100 71 46 FOOD + DRINK Beyond the screen, brands are involving children in hands-on experiences to educate them about the people and processes behind their food. Pantry Café, a Dubai-based gourmet café, hands out ‘homegrown kits', encouraging children to cultivate their own ‘mini garden’, and observe, experiment and learn about the production of the food they consume. “As a mother of two, I want my children to take an interest in the food that they’re eating. This campaign was born from the desire to promote the use of real ingredients to create real food for children.” says Yana Kalwani, vice-chairperson, Retail & Beyond, the company behind the café. Why it’s interesting: The ‘unspoiled’ nature of a child’s palate means that they have no inbuilt knowledge of what is good or bad, leaving the responsibility to parents, schools but also commercial entities to instill healthy habits in the young. “A child is born with a clean palate. They are almost open to everything. However, as they grow, there are eating habits which they learn or reject.” said chef Karan Purohit, in a panel at Caterer Middle East’s Food & Business Conference. As parents continue to obsess over what goes into their children’s mouths, expect more brands to champion initiatives that foster positive behaviors among the consumers of tomorrow. Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), University of Washington, 2013
  18. 18. 51-60 Beauty Photo Credit: Prismologie
  19. 19. THE FUTURE 100 87 Abe & Jar's beard oil Source: (1) Euromonitor International, 2015 With a ‘Menaissance’ knocking at our doors, beauty is shedding its default femininity and turning its attention to the legions of Arab men interested in personal pampering. Poised to hit a value of $829m in 2019, the Middle East’s men’s grooming market is brimming with male-exclusive beauty spaces, upscale vintage-style barber shops and all-men spa retreats1 . Harvey Nichols Dubai recently added 9,000 sq. meters to its menswear department, to include a grooming lounge for men while the Four Seasons Riyadh opened doors to the Kingdom's first all-men’s spa, offering body wraps, specialty facials and more. Homegrown beauty brands targeting men are sprouting up. Abe & Jar, based in Dubai, is a one stop shop for high quality male grooming care essentials, with offerings like an ‘Ocean Calm Beard Oil’ and a ‘Marine Oud Mustache Wax’. “The contemporary man is no longer averse to pampering himself with choice beauty products and haircare aids. Beauty treatments, skin conditioning and manicures are par for the course as part of the grooming routine, which earlier used to comprise an occasional visit to the barber for a trim and a shave.” said Ahmed Pauwels, CEO of Messe Frankfurt Middle East, organizers of Beautyworld Middle East, the largest international trade fair for beauty in the MENA. Men: The New Beauty Consumer 58 BEAUTY This male awakening is breathing new light into the long-standing debate around beauty and feminism and ushering in a new wave of gender-neutral beauty products that destigmatize beauty for men. Take unisex skincare brand Beau and Eve, which was created with the ‘bon vivant’ in mind. The brand, which combines the French word ‘Beau’ used to describe masculine beauty, with the ultimate symbol of femininity ‘Eve’, implies a more equalitarian stance on beauty for the genders.
  20. 20. 5 8 THE FUTURE 100 88 Beau & Eve, Unisex skin care range Beyond the uptake of ‘dude grooming’, the realization that beauty and well-being are intertwined is also catching on amongst male consumers. According to Khaleej Times, the ‘Mantox’ is becoming an increasingly popular phenomenon in the UAE, as unprecedented numbers of men opt for detox cleanses to boost their overall health. As for fitness, The National reports that Pilates, spinning, yoga and even pole fitness classes in Dubai are witnessing an increased male turnout, as more men come to recognize the tangible benefits of these sports. On the other end of the beauty spectrum, ‘Brotox’, or botox for men, is becoming increasingly popular. “Of the top non-invasive cosmetic procedures, Botox takes the prize among men,” states Dr. Alexandre Dionyssopoulos, a plastic and reconstructive surgeon at Dubai Cosmetic Surgery, adding that 20-25% of his Botox clients are men. Dr. Ghanima Al-Omar, a consultant in skin diseases and laser cosmetics at Kuwait’s Skin Clinic, revealed that 35% of her clients are males who undergo injectable fillers, Botox, and skin whitening. Why it’s interesting: As we move away from a hetero-normative view of the world, expect more brands to embrace the genderless movement, or risk failing to keep pace with changing norms. 58 BEAUTY
  21. 21. 61-70 Retail Kenzo Bus
  22. 22. THE FUTURE 100 98 Under Armour HealthBox With the technology industry reaching new heights of cultural influence, it’s strange to imagine that only a few years ago the merger between fashion and digital culture was viewed as a novelty with questionable staying power. Uniqlo seemed like an outlier in 2013 when company president Tadashi Yanai noted that “Uniqlo is not a fashion company, it’s a technology company.” Today, to prepare for the Internet of Things, all brands can, and should be a technology brand, says Manning Gottlieb OMD's managing director. In an era of connecting everyone and everything, there’s a huge tech focus on the latter, which will be greater enabled by the increasing capacity in 4.5G. Under Armour is making interesting plays in the connected space — one example being its partnership with HTC ‘Healthbox’, a one-stop fitness shop with a wearable fitness band, a set of smart scales and a heart monitor. Every Brand is a Tech Brand 65 RETAIL
  23. 23. THE FUTURE 100 99 ‘Seven’, a subscription platform by Al Rifai Nuts Closer to home, Al Rifai Nuts roastery recently launched its ‘Seven’ raw and organic product line, under a subscription platform that also connects to a calorie tracker app. Recognizing the importance of healthy eating habits to curbing stress, ‘Seven’s’ mission is to deliver a weekly recommended intake of supercharged nuts to people’s doorsteps. Beyond the wearables in health and fitness, were also seeing broader applications across industries. Following the recent UK launch of the Amazon Echo, the Jamie Oliver Group launched a skill with agency AKQA in London. Jamie fans can now ask Alexa to recommend recipes, discuss the options and, once they’ve found a suitable recipe, can have it emailed to them. 65 RETAIL Why it’s interesting: Brands and retailers are increasingly putting digital innovation at the core of their strategy, reinventing subscriptions, powering retail insights with AI, speeding up delivery times and much more.
  24. 24. 71-80 Health Electric Run, Dubai
  25. 25. THE FUTURE 100 110 Bulletproof, Brain Octane fuel Nootropics: Powering Peak Performance 72 HEALTH As the optimized nutrition trend continues to evolve, startups are using so-called “bio hacking” to engineer products that offer performance boosting properties without negative side effects. Nootropics – sometimes called smart drugs – are compounds that enhance brain function and are becoming a popular way to effectively “hack” the body to achieve certain goals. Supplements, much like exercise regimes, lend themselves well to customization, and many consumers are investing in personalized programs to improve focus, memory and intelligence and boost athletic performance. Bulletproof, a nootropic coffee, is becoming a popular addition to most health stores in the region. The coffee when blended with the ‘Bulletproof Brain Octane fuel’, claims to help drinkers reach peak cognitive performance and enjoy cumulative long-term benefits. “Our mission is to help people perform better, think faster, and live better using a proven blend of ancient knowledge and brand new technologies, tempered by research, science, and measured results from our customers, top athletes, and medical professionals.” promises the company. The notion that there are natural limits to our physical and intellectual abilities is progressively weakening. Electrical muscle stimulation devices (EMS) that promise a full body workout in 20 minutes have been cropping up in gyms and fitness centers across the UAE and Lebanon. A study published in the German-language Dtsch Z Sportmed in September concluded that EMS "may be a good choice for people unable or simply unwilling to conduct intense resistance training protocols" because of time constraints and concerns about effect on joints. For healthcare and tech brands, the future is not only in finding solutions to human illness and frailties, but also finding ways to improve the mental and physical performance of the healthy through augmentation and bio-upgradable technology. Why it’s interesting: Self optimization is the watchword of the wellbeing movement, which is now moving beyond natural enhancement to body “hacking,” and rising comfort. With the desire to both chemically stimulate and self-improve while still emphasizing natural, consumers continue to want it all.
  26. 26. 81-90 Lifestyle World Drone Prix Circuit, Dubai
  27. 27. THE FUTURE 100 132 Anxy magazine founded by Indhira Rojas New Mental Health 86 LIFESTYLE The stigma around mental health is breaking down thanks in part to life coaching practices and organizations working to provide the right support. Violence, injustice, inequality and the impact of modern-day living – all prevalent within MENA societies – are primary drivers of mental illnesses. Yet, the subject is often hushed and ridiculed, widely viewed as trivial, temporary or self-healing, taking a backseat to political and economic turmoil that is the mainstay of our countries. Suicide rates have skyrocketed this past year; one in four Lebanese individuals suffer from mental illness in their lifetime, with one suicide reported every three days. And according to a 2013 Dubai Health Authority study, about one in five teenage students in the emirate showed symptoms of depression. "There seems to be a rise in stress, anxiety and depressive feelings in teenagers. This is exacerbated by the lack of effective coping strategies as well as lack of proper avenues of emotional release," explained Dr. Kanafani, professor of psychology at the Middlesex University in Dubai. More parents in the UAE are seeking support for their troubled teenagers. Organizations like Embrace, a mental health awareness and support network affiliated with the Department of Psychiatry at the American University of Beirut Medical Center (AUBMC) and Edraac, a non-profit NGO dedicated to mental health in Lebanon and the Arab World, are working to educate the public, raise awareness and break the stigma surrounding mental illness. Edraac organizes an annual memorial ‘walk’ at the break of dawn, “so that people "wake up" to awareness about mental illness”. Edraac is also working to install a hotline for individuals to share their personal stories, when they need to talk. Companies are now partnering with national organizations to offer users support. At the end of 2016, Instagram rolled out its new mental health support feature. Alongside “like” and “comment,” users can now anonymously report posts that may indicate a need for help. Flagged users receive a message that offers resources, such as a local support helpline or talking to a friend. Parent company Facebook has a similar tool, which was expanded in June for users of all languages it covers. Why it’s interesting: According to Bayt, 46% of working adults admit to being stressed – that’s one mental illness during their lifetime, and anxiety rates for generation Z are already through the roof. In stressed-out times, consumers are beginning to consider mental health alongside physical health as one of the many components that comprise wellbeing.
  28. 28. 91-100 Luxury Jimmy Choo, ‘Pick and Choos’ collection
  29. 29. THE FUTURE 100 143 Bulgari Vault app for safekeeping valuable data Data is the new Luxury 93 LUXURY In an age that has become increasingly beholden to data, people will increasingly come to hold their information as precious. In 2017, personal data will become the ultimate luxury good. ‘Bulgari Vault’ is a mobile app, created by luxury Roman Jeweler Bulgari, for safekeeping valuable data. From personal information and passwords to banking credentials, the platform secures users’ sensitive information in one place, unlocking it through up to 4 cumulative means - a combination of fingerprint, face recognition, dot pattern and password options. According to the brand, the data users input on the Bulgari Vault is physically stored in a high-security bunker in the Swiss Alps and can be synced from there directly to the app. Evolving past conventional security on devices, psk series is a series of jewelry—rings, necklaces, bracelets—with the diamond or gem that would typically be featured, replaced with something far more valuable per square millimeter: data. To Wagenknecht and Sunde, psk series shines a harsh light on technology industry business models that rely on users' data (instead of direct payment) to fund their operations. As Wagenknecht, one of the cofounders explains, “by re-contextualizing data as a physical object—something we recognize, replacing that already universally valuable object, the diamond, with it—we want to hack the implications of [peer-to-peer] contributions to the web and digital society.”
  30. 30. THE FUTURE 100 144 psk series jewelry carrying personal data 93 LUXURY In an effort that is perhaps more opportunistic than subversive, services that directly help people sell your data are emerging. One such service, Handshake, estimates that the average person could net between $1,600 and $8,000 per year by directly selling their data to companies. Why it’s interesting: As the conversation around the data value exchange heightens, personal data management will become more of a priority for people and organizations. Our SONAR data shows that 81% percent of people in the MENA believe that they should be compensated for their data with special services or privileges. Services like Handshake above speak directly to their needs.
  31. 31. Contact: Mennah Ibrahim MEA Director of the Innovation Group J. Walter Thompson Intelligence mennah.ibrahim@jwt.com Editors Mennah Ibrahim, the Innovation Group Dana El Hassan, the Innovation Group Visual editor Roger Boghos, J. Walter Thompson Beirut Cover Image To download the full report, please visit http://jwtmea.com/future100_2017 Hyperloop Bazxar Smarin About the Innovation Group The Innovation Group is J. Walter Thompson’s futurism, research and innovation unit. It charts emerging and future global trends, consumer change, and innovation patterns—translating these into insight for brands. It offers a suite of consultancy services, including bespoke research, presentations, co-branded reports and workshops. It is also active in innovation, partnering with brands to activate future trends within their framework and execute new products and concepts. Mennah Ibrahim, is MEA Director of the Innovation Group. About J. Walter Thompson Intelligence The Innovation Group is part of J. Walter Thompson Intelligence, a platform for global research, innovation and data analytics at J. Walter Thompson Company, housing three key in-house practices: SONAR™, Analytics and the Innovation Group. SONAR™ is J. Walter Thompson’s research unit that develops and exploits new quantitative and qualitative research techniques to understand cultures, brands and consumer motivation around the world. It is led by Mark Truss, Worldwide Director of Brand Intelligence. Analytics focuses on the innovative application of data and technology to inform and inspire new marketing solutions. It offers a suite of bespoke analytics tools and is led by Amy Avery, Head of Analytics, North America. Lucie Greene is Worldwide Director of the Innovation Group.

×