Importance of Background Screening

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Importance of Background Screening

  1. 1. January 22, 2010<br />Background Checking: Conducting Reference Background Checks<br />
  2. 2.  <br />Conducting Reference Background Checks<br />2<br />
  3. 3. Reference Background Checks<br /> <br />For the purpose of this research, the phrase “Reference background checks” refers to any verification of information provided by a job applicant (e.g., employment history), or communication with people regarding the job applicant (e.g., former supervisor or co-worker). It does not include credit and criminal background checks.<br />3<br />
  4. 4. Does your organization, or an agency hired by your organization, conduct reference background checks for any job candidates?<br />4<br />Note: n=433. Respondents who responded “Not sure” were excluded from the analysis.<br />
  5. 5. Which category of job candidates does your organization conduct reference background checks on? <br />5<br />Note: (n = 86) .The data in this figure represent organizations that conduct reference background checks on select job candidates. Percentages do not total to 100% as respondents were allowed multiple choices. <br />
  6. 6. In general, how frequently does your organization, or an agency hired by your organization, conduct any of the following reference background checks for its job candidates?<br />6<br />Note: n=301-398. Respondents who responded “Not applicable” were excluded from the analysis.<br />
  7. 7. In general, how frequently does your organization, or an agency hired by your organization, conduct any of the following referencebackground checks for its job candidates?<br />7<br />Comparison by Organizational Sector<br />Comparison by Organizational Staff Size<br />Nonprofit organizations conduct verifications of the following more than other sectors.<br />Verification of schools, colleges and/or universities attended: NP (65%) > Privately (PFP) (36%)<br />Verification of degree(s) conferred: NP (66%) > Privately (PFP) (40%)<br />Verification of certifications, licenses, etc.: NP (74%) > Publicly (FP) (32%), Privately (PFP) (23%)<br />Verification of schools, colleges and/or universities attended: Large (50%) > Medium (34%)<br />Verification of degree(s) conferred: Large (54%) > Small (36%)<br />Driving record check: Medium (40%) > Large (22%)<br />Verification of certifications, licenses, etc.: Large (41%) > Medium (26%)<br />Comparison by Scope of Organization's Business<br /><ul><li>Verification of certifications, licenses, etc.: Primarily state based (58%) > Primarily nationally based (33%)</li></ul>Note: Comparison by organizations’ sector, staff size and scope of business represent those who answered that their organizations “always” conduct reference background checks.<br />Privately owned for-profit organization = Private (PFP) <br /> Publicly owned for-profit organization = Publicly (FP)<br /> Nonprofit organization = NP <br /> Government sector = Govt<br />Small = 1-99 employees <br /> Medium = 100-499 employees <br /> Large = 500 or more employees <br />
  8. 8. In general, how frequently does your organization, or an agency hired by your organization, conduct any of the following reference background checks for its job candidates?<br />8<br />2009 Compared With 2004<br />Note: Table represent those who answered that their organizations “always” conduct reference background checks. Where possible, 2009 data are compared with 2004; a dash (--) indicates that this particular option was not asked in 2004. <br />
  9. 9. How often do you discover information that is inaccurate compared to what job candidates presented during the interview process when conducting reference background checks on job candidates regarding:<br />9<br />Note: n=107-365. Respondents who responded “Not applicable” were excluded from the analysis.<br />
  10. 10. In general, after conducting reference background checks, if inaccuracies/misrepresentations were discovered compared to what the job candidate presented during the interview process what types of information are MOST likely to impact your decision to NOT extend a job offer?<br />10<br />Note: n=185. Respondents were allowed to select their top three options.<br />
  11. 11. Does your organization allow job candidates, in certain circumstances, the opportunity to explain the results of their reference background check that might have an adverse effect on an employment decision?<br />11<br />Note: n=371<br />
  12. 12. What are the primary reasons that your organization conducts reference background checks on job candidates?<br />12<br />Note: n=369. Respondents were allowed to select their top two reasons.<br />
  13. 13. Demographics: Organization Industry<br />13<br />Note: n=312. Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.<br />
  14. 14. Demographics: Organization Industry (continued)<br />14<br />Note: n=312. Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.<br />
  15. 15. Demographics: Organization Sector<br />15<br />Note: n = 319. Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding<br />
  16. 16. Demographics: Organization Staff Size<br />16<br />Note: n = 312. Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding<br />
  17. 17. Demographics: Organization Region<br />17<br />Note: n = 312. Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding<br />
  18. 18. Demographics: Organization Operations Location<br />18<br />Note: n = 315. Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding<br />
  19. 19. Background Checking<br />Methodology<br />Response rate = 19%<br />Sample comprised of 433 randomly selected HR professionals from SHRM’s membership<br />Margin of error is +/- 5 <br />Survey fielded November 18 – December 4, 2009<br />19<br />

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