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Course

Experimental Image-Making

IMAGES
FROM
IMAGES

Instructor

Namdev Hardisty

1 	
Artists using their own work as
so...
Course

Experimental Image-Making

Instructor

Namdev Hardisty

1 	
Artists using their own work as
source material
Willem
de Kooning
Willem de Kooning was a member of the
highly-influential first wave of Abstract
Expressionists the movem...
Willem de Kooning
Red Eye
1955; 16.3 x 14 in; oil and collage on board
Willem de Kooning
Black and White Rome S
1959; 39 1/4 by 55 3/4 in.;
enamel and collage on
paper, double-sided
Franz Kline
Kline was another first-generation Abstract
Expressionist who was known for large stark
canvasses that looked ...
Franz Kline
Untitled
c.1948; 58.6 x 76.2 in; oil and paper
collage on board
Franz Kline
Untitled
c.1956; 10 7/8 x 8 5/8 in;
ink on telephone book page

Franz Kline
Study for Clockface
1950; 11.2 x 9...
Franz Kline
Untitled II,
c.1952; oil and ink on paper,
collage on board
Franz Kline
Black, White, Brown
c.1959; 11 5/16 x 8 1/4 in;
oil and ink on paper, collage on board
GERHARD
RICHTER
Gerhard Richter is known for a life-long concern
with perception that he’s explored through
painting: how ...
Photographs which are exactly what they sound
like—photographic prints that have been painted
over using one of Richter’s ...
Gerhard Richter
Ohne Title
1989; 10 cm x 15 cm;
oil on colour photograph
Gerhard Richter
Ohne Title (7. April-05)
2005; 14.8 cm x 10 cm;
oil on colour photograph
Gerhard Richter
Ohne Titel (25. März 03)
2003; 10 cm x 15 cm; oil on colour photograph
Gerhard Richter
Ohne Title (19.2.92)
1992; 14.5 cm x 10 cm; oil on colour photograph
Gerhard Richter
Ohne Title (8.9.1994)
1994; 14.8 cm x 10 cm; oil on colour photograph
Patterns. Divided, Mirrored, Repeated
2012; artists book

“The artist’s book documents Gerhard Richter’s
experiment of tak...
This slide and next:
Gerhard Richter
Page from Patterns. Divided, Mirrored, Repeated
2012; artists book
War Cut
2004; artists book

War Cut, designed by Gerhard Richter focuses on
Abstract Painting [CR: 648-2] of 1987, which i...
PETER
SAVILLE
British art director most famous for designing
record sleeves for Factory Records in the
late 70s and early ...
Peter Saville
Joy 3 (from the series Waste Paintings)
1998–2008
Peter Saville
Joy 1 (from the series Waste Paintings)
1998–2008
Peter Saville
Made of Waste II
(from the series Waste Paintings)
1998–2008
source material
2	 Existing works modified by artists
3	
Strategies for remixing images
(beyond the obvious)
RICHARD
PRINCE
Prince is a pioneer of “appropriation art”
turning everything from car hoods to the
Marlboro Man into extre...
Richard Prince
Even Lower Manhattan (from the series Tiffany)
2007; 65 1/2 x 80 in.; ink jet and acrylic on canvas
Richard Prince
Town Without Pity (from the series Tiffany)
2007; 65 1/2 x 80 in.; ink jet and acrylic on canvas
Richard Prince
Surf Safari Nurse (from the series Nurses)
2007–8; 90 x 54 in.; ink jet and acrylic on canvas
ROBERT
RAUSCHENBERG
Rauschenberg revolutionized art many times
over from using his bed as canvas to
incorporating an angor...
Robert Rauschenberg
Erased de Kooning Drawing
1953; 25 1/4 x 21 3/4 x 1/2 in.; traces of drawing
media on paper with label...
3	
Strategies for remixing images

Last Updated

February 2014
3	
Strategies for remixing images

Last Updated

February 2014

	 1.	 Paint Over
	 2. 	Photocopy
	 3. 	Scan
	4. 	Monoprint...
Last Updated

February 2014

This presentation was produced for Namdev
Hardisty’s Experimental Image-Making
workshop at Mi...
Images From Images: Artists using their own work as raw material
Images From Images: Artists using their own work as raw material
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Images From Images: Artists using their own work as raw material

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A collection of artists that use that create new art from their previous work or that modify existing materials including Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline and Gerhard Richter.
This deck is from the class “Experimental Image-Making” at Minneapolis College of Art & Design.

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Images From Images: Artists using their own work as raw material

  1. 1. Course Experimental Image-Making IMAGES FROM IMAGES Instructor Namdev Hardisty 1 Artists using their own work as source material 2 Existing works modified by artists 3 Strategies for remixing images Last Updated February 2014
  2. 2. Course Experimental Image-Making Instructor Namdev Hardisty 1 Artists using their own work as source material
  3. 3. Willem de Kooning Willem de Kooning was a member of the highly-influential first wave of Abstract Expressionists the movement that brought an American edge to painting—raw, pure, and obsessed with originality. He used various forms of collage to find new ways to make images experimenting with cutting up existing works and reconfiguring them or making studies to collage with later. American, born Netherlands b. 1932 d. 1997
  4. 4. Willem de Kooning Red Eye 1955; 16.3 x 14 in; oil and collage on board
  5. 5. Willem de Kooning Black and White Rome S 1959; 39 1/4 by 55 3/4 in.; enamel and collage on paper, double-sided
  6. 6. Franz Kline Kline was another first-generation Abstract Expressionist who was known for large stark canvasses that looked like calligraphy painted with house-painter’s brushes. In fact, Kline began all his paintings as small, quick gesture drawings executed on phonebook pages, a cheap, abundant and none-too-precious resource. Collaging existing paintings was part of his practice throughout the 1950s but his phonebook collages created from failed drawings are especially interesting. American b. 1910 d. 1962
  7. 7. Franz Kline Untitled c.1948; 58.6 x 76.2 in; oil and paper collage on board
  8. 8. Franz Kline Untitled c.1956; 10 7/8 x 8 5/8 in; ink on telephone book page Franz Kline Study for Clockface 1950; 11.2 x 9.25 in; ink on telephone book page
  9. 9. Franz Kline Untitled II, c.1952; oil and ink on paper, collage on board
  10. 10. Franz Kline Black, White, Brown c.1959; 11 5/16 x 8 1/4 in; oil and ink on paper, collage on board
  11. 11. GERHARD RICHTER Gerhard Richter is known for a life-long concern with perception that he’s explored through painting: how the rendering of an image affects its meaning, the ways that abstract images remind us of other things, the haze of memory. He’s known in particular for working within multiple styles simultaneously from photo-realism to heroic abstraction and without end. One such project are the Painted Photographs which are exactly what they sound like—photographic prints that have been painted German b. 1932
  12. 12. Photographs which are exactly what they sound like—photographic prints that have been painted over using one of Richter’s trademark techniques. In his artists books he explore pieces of his paintings whether photographic details of varying perspectives and depth of field or the remixing of one painting in Patterns. Divided, Mirrored, Repeated.
  13. 13. Gerhard Richter Ohne Title 1989; 10 cm x 15 cm; oil on colour photograph
  14. 14. Gerhard Richter Ohne Title (7. April-05) 2005; 14.8 cm x 10 cm; oil on colour photograph
  15. 15. Gerhard Richter Ohne Titel (25. März 03) 2003; 10 cm x 15 cm; oil on colour photograph
  16. 16. Gerhard Richter Ohne Title (19.2.92) 1992; 14.5 cm x 10 cm; oil on colour photograph
  17. 17. Gerhard Richter Ohne Title (8.9.1994) 1994; 14.8 cm x 10 cm; oil on colour photograph
  18. 18. Patterns. Divided, Mirrored, Repeated 2012; artists book “The artist’s book documents Gerhard Richter’s experiment of taking an image of his original Abstract Painting [CR: 724-4] and dividing it vertically into strips: first 2, then 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, 1024, 2048, up to 4096 strips. This process (twelve stages of division) results in 8190 strips, each of which is the height of the original image. With each stage of division the strips become progressively thinner (a strip of the 12th division is 0.08 mm). Endless more divisions are possible, but they would soon only become visible by enlargement. Each strip is then mirrored and repeated, which results in patterns. The number of repetitions increases with each stage of division in order to make patterns of consistent size. The result of 238 listed patterns is published on 238 double page images.” —from GerhardRichter.com
  19. 19. This slide and next: Gerhard Richter Page from Patterns. Divided, Mirrored, Repeated 2012; artists book
  20. 20. War Cut 2004; artists book War Cut, designed by Gerhard Richter focuses on Abstract Painting [CR: 648-2] of 1987, which is located at Musée d’art moderne de la ville de Paris. In May 2002, Gerhard Richter took detailed photographs of the picture, in which dark colours dominate and whose rather rough appearance is striking. Two years later, Richter takes the photographs up again for his book project War Cut. 216 closeup photographs are juxtaposed to 216 texts from the German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeinen Zeitung of 20th and 21th March 2003, the beginning of the Iraq War. Whereas Gerhard Richter assembles the pictures following aesthetical principles, the texts are mainly printed in their chronological order. —from GerhardRichter.com
  21. 21. PETER SAVILLE British art director most famous for designing record sleeves for Factory Records in the late 70s and early 80s including those for Joy Division and New Order. Saville was known for “quoting” art and design history through pastiche and appropriation. He began creating “Waste Paintings” in the 1990s—heavily processed abstractions that used his now iconic designs as source material. British b. 1955
  22. 22. Peter Saville Joy 3 (from the series Waste Paintings) 1998–2008
  23. 23. Peter Saville Joy 1 (from the series Waste Paintings) 1998–2008
  24. 24. Peter Saville Made of Waste II (from the series Waste Paintings) 1998–2008
  25. 25. source material 2 Existing works modified by artists 3 Strategies for remixing images (beyond the obvious)
  26. 26. RICHARD PRINCE Prince is a pioneer of “appropriation art” turning everything from car hoods to the Marlboro Man into extremely visual and powerful images. His paintings almost always start with a certain genre of image that is then modified to change the tone and meaning. His Tiffany series uses blown-up spreads from The New York Times as a surface to explore while masking out virtually all information besides a Tiffany Co. ad in the top-right corner. American, born Panama b. 1949
  27. 27. Richard Prince Even Lower Manhattan (from the series Tiffany) 2007; 65 1/2 x 80 in.; ink jet and acrylic on canvas
  28. 28. Richard Prince Town Without Pity (from the series Tiffany) 2007; 65 1/2 x 80 in.; ink jet and acrylic on canvas
  29. 29. Richard Prince Surf Safari Nurse (from the series Nurses) 2007–8; 90 x 54 in.; ink jet and acrylic on canvas
  30. 30. ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG Rauschenberg revolutionized art many times over from using his bed as canvas to incorporating an angora goat into a painting and obliterating the line between art and performance. Still his most well-known piece might be Erased Willem de Kooning Drawing, an investigation into making art through subtraction. After some persuading de Kooning that it wasn’t an insult he was given a densely worked on drawing to erase. It took two months. American b. 1925 d. 2008
  31. 31. Robert Rauschenberg Erased de Kooning Drawing 1953; 25 1/4 x 21 3/4 x 1/2 in.; traces of drawing media on paper with label and gilded frame
  32. 32. 3 Strategies for remixing images Last Updated February 2014
  33. 33. 3 Strategies for remixing images Last Updated February 2014 1. Paint Over 2. Photocopy 3. Scan 4. Monoprint 5. Turn into a brush 6. Trace 7. Burn 8. Fold 9. Collage onto 10. Cut-up 1 1. Turn into an object 12. Cut through 13. Tape over 14. Film 15. Hide 16. Run over 17. Bury 18. Weather 19. Lose 20. Turn into a surface 21. Wear
  34. 34. Last Updated February 2014 This presentation was produced for Namdev Hardisty’s Experimental Image-Making workshop at Minneapolis College of Art Design. A 10-week visual arts course investigating chance operations, gesture, speed and quantity produced by MCAD Continuing Education and The MVA Studio. For more information visit the-mva.com/teach and mcad.edu.

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