The ‘How’ of Open Access: Implementing Open Access in Universities <br />Stephen Pinfield<br />Chief Information Officer a...
Two routes to Open Access*<br />OA repositories: “Green route”<br />OA journal publishing: “Gold route”<br />  	* ‘Open ac...
Institutional approaches to OA<br />Institutional OA repository for research outputs (green OA)<br />OA publication fund  ...
Institutional support for OA repositories<br />Institutional repository (IR)<br />Most UK research universities now have a...
Examples<br />
Institutional support for OA journal publishing<br />Most OA journal publishing involves an OA fee (fully-OA and ‘hybrid’ ...
An example: Nottingham central OA fund<br />Fund set up in November 2006<br />Open to all members of staff<br />Administer...
Institutional policy development<br />Institutions should consider establishing clear policies in relation to OA<br />Driv...
An example: Nottingham policy<br />This policy applies to all members of staff employed by the University of Nottingham in...
Guidance, support and monitoring<br />Guidance<br />Awareness raising<br />Discussing benefits<br />Addressing common conc...
Stephen.Pinfield@Nottingham.ac.ukInformation ServicesUniversity of Nottingham<br />
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The "How" of Open Access: Implementing Open Access in Universities

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Presented by Stephen Pinfield at the JISC Future of Research Conference, 19th October 2010

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The "How" of Open Access: Implementing Open Access in Universities

  1. 1. The ‘How’ of Open Access: Implementing Open Access in Universities <br />Stephen Pinfield<br />Chief Information Officer and Director of the Centre for Research Communications, University of Nottingham<br />
  2. 2. Two routes to Open Access*<br />OA repositories: “Green route”<br />OA journal publishing: “Gold route”<br /> * ‘Open access’ (OA): Where content is fully, freely, immediately and permanently available and can be accessed and reused in an unrestricted way (based on Pinfield, 2009)<br />
  3. 3. Institutional approaches to OA<br />Institutional OA repository for research outputs (green OA)<br />OA publication fund (gold OA)<br />Clear policy direction<br />Proactive guidance, support and monitoring<br />
  4. 4. Institutional support for OA repositories<br />Institutional repository (IR)<br />Most UK research universities now have an IR<br />Most publishers allow deposit in a repository<br />Encouraging their widespread use remains a challenge<br />Advocacy and support required<br />Integration of the IR with institutional research management processes and planning is a priority<br />Other repositories<br />Examples include large-scale subject repositories<br />Institutions can raise awareness and encourage their use<br />
  5. 5. Examples<br />
  6. 6. Institutional support for OA journal publishing<br />Most OA journal publishing involves an OA fee (fully-OA and ‘hybrid’ journals)<br />Most large journal publishers have an OA option<br />Most research funders allow OA fees to be paid as part of direct or indirect costs<br />For publications after a grant is spent, researchers need access to funds<br />A centrally-coordinated institutional fund is an obvious way to address this<br />
  7. 7. An example: Nottingham central OA fund<br />Fund set up in November 2006<br />Open to all members of staff<br />Administered by the research support office<br />Usage of the fund still relatively low but growing<br />2008-9, 100 articles at a cost of £120,614<br />Average cost per article 2006-9 £1112<br />Latest figures: 2009-10, 204 articles<br />Most claimants in the medical and life sciences<br />
  8. 8. Institutional policy development<br />Institutions should consider establishing clear policies in relation to OA<br />Drivers:<br />Improving research<br />Citation advantage <br />Increasing research income<br />Knowledge-transfer/impact benefits <br />Compliance with funder requirements<br />Policy ‘templates’ are available<br />IPR/copyright policy important in relation to research outputs<br />Senior academic ‘champion’ to provide leadership<br />
  9. 9. An example: Nottingham policy<br />This policy applies to all members of staff employed by the University of Nottingham in all campuses.<br />All research papers (including journal articles, conference proceedings, book chapters and similar material), where copyright allows, should be made available in an open-access form upon publication.<br />All research papers (either in the form of the author’s final manuscript or the formally-published version), where copyright allows, should be deposited in the Nottingham ePrints repository upon publication or as soon as possible thereafter.<br />Where available, researchers should take advantage of opportunities to publish their work in an open-access form offered by journal publishers, and can make use of research grants and/or the institutional central OA fund in order to pay open-access publication fees.<br /> November 2009<br />
  10. 10. Guidance, support and monitoring<br />Guidance<br />Awareness raising<br />Discussing benefits<br />Addressing common concerns:<br />Quality<br />IPR/copyright<br />Undermining the ‘tried-and-tested’<br />Time constraints<br />Proactive support<br />Monitoring<br />Responsibility to demonstrate compliance to funders<br />
  11. 11. Stephen.Pinfield@Nottingham.ac.ukInformation ServicesUniversity of Nottingham<br />

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