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Student digital experience tracker 2017: summary of key findings

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Student digital experience tracker 2017: summary of key findings

  1. 1. Student digital experience tracker 2017, summary of key findings Jessica Francis, research manager product and improvement. Sarah Knight, head of change student experience 1 06/07/2017
  2. 2. 06/07/2017 2 Project Background
  3. 3. Background & Overview 06/07/2017 3 The student digital experience tracker allows universities, colleges and skills providers to:  Gather evidence from learners about their digital experience and track changes over time (this data = year 1)  Make better informed decisions about the digital environment  Target resources for improving digital provision  Plan other research, data gathering and student engagement around digital issues  Demonstrate quality enhancement and student engagement to external bodies and students themselves Jisc student digital experience tracker survey 2017: the voice of 22,000 UK learners Key facts: Concise set of questions, extensively tested with learners Guidance provided to organisations deploying the tracker on implementation, data access, analysis & benchmarking Run through BOS Jisc Beta Pilot In field: Nov 2016 – March 2017 4 versions of tracker created for each learner group:  ACL & Skills  FE  HE  Online Reporting & analysis comparisons focus on learner group rather than organisational type Tracker version / learner group No. providers using each version No. UK responses Mean responses per institution ACL and Skills 6 1,337 (5.9%) 222.8 FE 36 12,347 (54.6%) 343.0 HE 38 8,190 (36.3%) 215.5 Online Learner 9 719 (3.2%) 79.9 TOTAL 89* 22,593 305.3 *N.B. Some organisations used more than one version of the tracker Estimated margin of error for % figures reported are ACL & Skills (± 2.7%), FE (± 0.9%), HE (± 1.1%) and online (± 10.0% )
  4. 4. 06/07/2017 4 Summary of Key Findings - KeyTakeouts -Learner Group Differences
  5. 5. KeyTakeouts 06/07/2017 5  Differences exist in the parity of provision & use of devices across the different learner groups, which could impact the future delivery of digital content/services:  Lower wi-fi access for FE  Higher reliance on personal devices in HE  Digital technology in the learning space appears to be working well to deliver content, but is not fully engaging learners. The transformational aspect is still missing currently.  Learners do not feel like their courses are preparing them well for the digital workplace, suggesting a potential mismatch between the skills employees require and those students are familiar with  More could be done by providers to support & educate learners on digital safety and wellbeing  Low proportions of learners are engaged with their providers on current digital provision & future development. The student digital tracker provides an ideal platform to open up this conversation
  6. 6. ACL & Skills Learners 6 Key findings in digital behaviours & attitudes that distinguish ACL & Skills learners from the other learner groups Lower device & digital service use evident with the ACL & Skills learner group:  Less likely than the other groups to have access to nearly all the digital services  Use lowest number of personal devices (0.74) to support their learning and least likely to use all types of institutional device for learning  Have lowest engagement with most digital learning activities, although most likely to use educational games/simulations weekly (30%) Less negativity towards the use of digital technology in learning is evident:  Learner group least likely to agree with all negative statements around use of digital technology. Given their lower digital engagement, this could highlight potential overuse/inappropriate use of digital technology with other learner groups? Focus is on tutors rather than peers for digital skills support:  Like FE, ACL and Skills learners (47%) most commonly turn to their tutors as their main source of learning digital skills  Fewer than 3% of this group turn to fellow students compared to one in five FE or HE Learners Whilst ACL & Skills learners are most likely to feel informed on data use, they are most negative about their own digital skills:  Most likely to agree their learning provider protects their data privacy (82%) & told how their personal data is being stored (56%)  Least likely to say they can complete all digital tasks compared to other learning groups (behaving safely & respectfully online, judging online content for its relevance & reliability, creating a positive online profile, changing privacy settings & manage passwords, modify standard setting to suit needs on their own)  Most negative on their course preparing them for the digital workplace (42% agree, 26% disagree)
  7. 7. FE Learners 06/07/2017 7 Key findings in digital behaviours & attitudes that distinguish FE learners from the other learner groups High use of institutional devices evident, but wi-fi access on site most challenging for this group:  Least likely of all learner groups to say they have reliable wi-fi access at their university/college (69%)  Highest average number of institutional devices used per learner (2.04) and the most likely to use all types of institutional device FE learners are the most likely to feel involved in digital decisions made by their provider, but are more negative about data privacy:  44% of FE learners agreed they were involved vs. 35% of HE learners. 19% of FE learners disagreed vs. 33% of HE learners  FE learners are the least likely to agree (75%) their learning provider protects their data privacy Focus is on tutors for digital skills support:  Like for ACL & Skills, FE learners most commonly turn to their tutors for support in learning digital skills (46%) Most positive on being made aware of digital skills they need to improve through their organisation, although still room for improvement:  Alongside ACL & Skills learners, half of FE learners (51%) agree they are made aware of what digital skills they need to improve, compared to 40% of online learners  Less than one fifth (18%) disagree, compared to 29% of online learners
  8. 8. HE Learners 06/07/2017 8 Key findings in digital behaviours & attitudes that distinguish HE learners from the other learner groups HE learners are more reliant on personal devices than institutional devices to support their learning:  HE learners, use an average of 2.74 personal device types to support their learning, the highest of any group  By contrast, they use on average of 1.44 institutional device types per learner, the lowest of all learner groups Interaction with different digital activities was variable:  Most likely to have produced work in a digital format (HE 96%), but have low use of educational games/simulations (HE42%, second lowest use after online learners)  HE learners most likely to rely on the VLE (80% HE vs 61% FE) Focus is on online resources to provide support in learning new digital skills  HE most commonly turn to online information to learn new digital skills (37%) HE learners are critical of support provided by their institutions in relation to digital skills/knowledge:  Only 53% of HE learners, the lowest of all learner groups agreed they understood what digital skills they needed before starting their course  Most likely to disagree (33%) that their institution involves them in digital decision making  Least likely to agree their learning provider helps them stay safe online (58%)  Alongside online learners, least likely to agree (41%) they’re told what digital skills they need to improve  82% agree that digital skills will be important in their chosen career, yet only 50% agree their course prepares them well for the workplace
  9. 9. Online Learners 06/07/2017 9 Key findings in digital behaviours & attitudes that distinguish online learners from the other learner groups Personal laptops dominate devices used for learning:  86% use a personal laptop for learning  Lowest instance of personal smartphone use for learning (26%) evident For online learners, interactive and social digital learning activity engagement is low and is a potential driver of dissatisfaction:  63% have never used an educational game/simulation, the lowest of all learner groups.  30% have never participated in a live online class/webinar & 25% have never worked with others online as part of their course  Whilst the flexibility of digital learning is clearly valued, most likely to agree with all measures of dissatisfaction, particularly with feeling more isolated. Like HE, focus is on online resources to provide support in learning new digital skills:  Online learners most commonly turn to online information to learn new digital skills (46%)  Fewer than 6% turn to fellow students as their main source of learning digital skills in comparison with circa one in five FE or HE Learners Most likely to feel informed around skills needed for their course and feel that their courses prepares them for workplace:  Most likely to agree that they understood what digital skills they needed before they started their course (66%)  Most likely to agree that their course prepares them for the workplace (56%) Online learners were the least likely to identify themselves as having a disability/health issue, an area for further investigation:  4% of online learners indicated they have a disability/health issues that affects their learning compared to 14% of HE learners
  10. 10. 06/07/2017 10 Use of Digital Devices, Services & Activities
  11. 11. 83% 64% Access to Digital Services 06/07/2017 11Q1. At your university/college/, do you have access to the following whenever you need them?/ Q1. Where you usually learn/study, do you have access to the following? Reliable wi-fi Online course materials E-books & e-journals Personal info online File storage & back-up Mobile access to organisational services Computers & printers Reliable mobile network My own social media  Overall, ACL & Skills learners were less likely than the other learner groups to have access to nearly all the digital services listed  However, FE learners are less likely to feel they have reliable wi-fi access in their usual place of learning compared to other learner groups, indicating provision could be improved 96% 80% 69% 90% 99% 95% 93% 92% 93% 92% 89% 92% 89% 76% 93% 81% 88% 76% 90% 84% 93% 91% 95% 84% 85% 85% ACL & Skills learners FE learners HE learners Online learners
  12. 12. Institutional Device Use 06/07/2017 12Q2. Which of these personal or University-owned/college owned digital devises do you use to support your learning? /Q3. Which of these devices do you use to support your learning? /Q3. Which of these digital device(s) do you use to access your online learning? ACL & Skills learners Institutional Desktop Laptop Tablet/iPad Smartphone Printer 66% 83% 26% 10% 36% 15% 4% 14% 9% 1% 5% 2% 63% 67% 22% FE learners HE learners Online learners 1.9 2.04 1.44 Mean number of device types used per learner  For institutional devices, overall learners are most likely to use desktops & printers to support their learning  FE learners are the most likely learner group to use all types of institutional device. They also use on average the highest number of institutional device types to support their learning (2.04)  HE learners are less reliant on institutional devices, using on average only 1.4 types of personal device per learner, the lowest of all groups. Their use is focussed on desktops and printers  For ACL & Skills learners, whilst the mean number of institutional devices used to support learning is higher (1.9), they are less likely than other learner groups to use all types of institutional device
  13. 13. Personal Device Use 06/07/2017 13Q2. Which of these personal or University-owned/college owned digital devises do you use to support your learning? /Q3. Which of these devices do you use to support your learning? /Q3. Which of these digital device(s) do you use to access your online learning? ACL & Skills learners Desktop Laptop Tablet/iPad Smartphone Printer FE learners HE learners Online learners Mean number of device types used per learner Personal 33% 19% 22% 23% 86% 88% 48% 51% 33% 41% 29% 35% 26% 84% 78% 47% 40% 25% 34% 0.74 2.02 2.72 1.78  More portable devices like laptops and smartphones are the most popular personal devices used to support learning overall (although tablets/iPads less so)  HE learners are the most likely to use all personal device types except desktops and use on average 2.72 types of personal device to support their learning. They are significantly more likely than FE learners or ACL & Skills learners to use personally-owned laptops, tablets, smartphones and printers  On average, ACL & Skills learners use the lowest number of personal devices (0.74) to support their learning  Alongside high use of institutional devices, FE learners also rely on personal devices to support their learning, using on average 2.02 different types of institutional device  For online learners, personal device use is dominated by laptops. This group have the lowest instance of personal smartphone use for learning, potentially driven by a lack of need for content ‘on the go’
  14. 14. Digital Activity Frequency Within Courses 06/07/2017 14 ACL & Skills  Variation in engagement with different digital activities. Traditional content delivery activities like finding information online & producing work in a digital format have higher engagement  More transformative technology including educational gaming/simulation & interactive polling/online quizzes have lower levels of engagement  Despite low digital engagement in their courses overall, ACL & Skills learners are the most likely to use educational games/simulations weekly (30%)  For Online learners, interactive & social digital activity engagement is low. 63% have never used an educational game/simulation, 30% have never participated in a live online class/webinar & 25% have never worked with others online as part of their course. 17% 30% 40% 43% 23% 76% 31% 27% 24% 22% 19% 16% 51% 43% 37% 35% 58% 8% Use polling device/online quiz in class Use educational game/simulation in learning Create formal record of your learning Produce work in a digital format Work online with others Find information online FE HE Online 28% 27% 45% 76% 45% 87% 38% 34% 35% 17% 33% 9% 34% 39% 20% 6% 22% 2% Use polling device/online quiz in class Use educational game/simulation in learning Create formal record of your learning Produce work in a digital format Work online with others Find information online 15% 14% 37% 73% 35% 96% 37% 28% 38% 23% 43% 4% 48% 58% 25% 4% 22% 1% Use polling device/online quiz in class Use educational game/simulation in learning Create formal record of your learning Produce work in a digital format Work online with others Find information online 61% 22% 10% 46% 76% 48% 97% 33% 48% 27% 34% 16% 27% 3% 6% 30% 63% 21% 8% 25% Apply your learning to a real-world situation Take part in a live online class or webinar Use educational game/simulation in learning Create formal record of your learning Produce work in a digital format Work online with others Find information online =weekly or more =monthly or less =never Q6/Q7. As part of your course/online course, how often do you do the following digital activities?
  15. 15. Use of Digital LearningTools 06/07/2017 15Q7. In your own learning time, how often do you use digital tools or apps to…? /Q8. How often do you use digital tools or apps to? ACL & Skills FE HE Online Manage links/references Organise your study time Make notes or recordings Look for additional resources Access lecture notes/recorded lectures Access learning on the move Watch or listen to learning materials Discuss learning informally on social media 39% 28% 33% 36% 18% 47% 42% 23% 35% 49% 32% 19% 34% 23% 42% 51% 29% 21% 15%17% 69% 54% 29% 17% 50% 29% 21% 65% 22% 13% 59% 29% 12% 52% 28% 20% 47% 35% 18% 35% 25% 40% 61% 27% 13% 48% 24% 28% 64% 20% 15% 82% 14%5% 69% 26% 5% 58% 31% 11% 40% 26% 34% 59% 25% 16% 57% 20% 22% 59% 19% 22% 40% 21% 40% 75% 19%7% 71% 17%12% 44% 27% 28% 15% 26% 59% 28% 23% 49% 43% 32% 25% The most popular tools to engage with on a weekly basis varied between the learner groups:  ACL & Skills learners most likely to watch/listen to learning materials weekly (51%) when compared to other activities, but their engagement with all digital learning tools is lower than the other learner groups  FE learners most likely to make notes/recordings weekly (65%) when compared to other digital tools/apps  HE learners most likely to access lecture notes/recorded lectures weekly (82%) when compared to other digital tools/apps  Online learners most likely to look for additional resources not recommended by their course leader on a weekly basis (75%)  Proportions discussing learning informally on social media are low across groups:  Is this being underreported & do we need to understand more about the integration of formal & informal digital spaces in learner lives? =weekly or more =monthly or less =never
  16. 16. 06/07/2017 16 Attitudes to Digital Learning
  17. 17. 18% 17% 16% 11% Attitudes to Use of DigitalTechnologies 06/07/2017 17Q8/Q9. When digital technology is used on my course… /Q9. When I study online… 34% 59% 64% 58% When digital technology is used on my course… (% agree) 86% 71% 69% 63% 20% 44% 42% 50% I understand things better I am more independent in my learning I feel more connected with my lecturers 27% 40% 46% 38% 81% 73% 65% 62% 75% I feel more connected with other learners I can fit learning into my life more easily I can access learning that would be impossible to access physically  Overall learners are more positive than negative on digital technology use to support their courses, with convenience & independence driving this  Tech least favoured for feeling connected with others  Online learners value the flexibility digital technology affords for learning, yet they are more likely than any other group to agree with all measures of dissatisfaction, particularly with feeling more isolated.  Is this indicative of a need for more social based digital learning provision?  For FE & HE, the biggest issue with digital technology in learning is being more easily distracted.  Could a lack of interactivity be driving this?  For ACL & Skills, they are the least likely to agree with all negative statements around use of digital technology, which contrasts with their lower engagement with digital activities/devices as part of their learning generally:  Does this raise the question around overuse/inappropriate use of tech with other learner groups? ACL & Skills learners FE learners 26% 24% 22% 12% 20% 14% 14% 12% 31% 13% 12% 10% I am more easily distracted I find it harder to manage all the information I feel more isolated 16% 8% 6% I find it harder to motivate myself I am less likely to attend class + - HE learners Online learners
  18. 18. Attitudes toVLE (optional) 06/07/2017 18 80% 61%I rely on it to do my coursework 31% 67% 48% 31%I regularly access it on a mobile device 41% 41% I enjoy using the collaborative features 46% 40% I would like it to be used more by my tutors It provides everything I need to succeed in my course I enjoy using it to work with other learners Online feedback really helps me to improve 62% 59% 58% 50% 60% 60% 70% 52% Attitudes toVLE Q16/Q17. How much do you agree with the following statements? It is well designed  HE learners are most likely to rely on the VLE:  80% rely on it to do coursework, compared to only 61% of FE learners  67% regularly access VLE via a mobile device, compared to only 48% of FE learners & 31% of ACL & Skills & Online learners  Online learners are most likely to indicate online feedback (70%) really helps them improve, compared to only 52% of FE learners  Learners do not report feelings of enjoyment when it comes to VLE use:  Only four in ten HE & FE learners say they enjoy using the collaborative features or want their tutors to use VLE more ACL & Skills learners FE learners HE learners Online learners
  19. 19. 06/07/2017 19 Knowledge & Involvement in Digital Decision Making
  20. 20. 60% 30% 27% Pre-course Knowledge of Digital Skills Required 06/07/2017 20Q13/Q14/Q15. How much do you agree with the following statements? 55% 27% 18% ACL & Skills  Only around half of HE learners (53%) & ACL & Skills learners (55%) agree that they understood what digital skills they needed before starting their course  For FE, results were slightly more positive, yet still only 60% of this group agree with this statement and 27% (the highest proportion of all the learner groups) disagree, indicating room for improvement  Online learners are most positive; 66% agree they understood what digital skills they needed before starting their course  This could be linked to pre-sessional tests, ‘readiness’ scores and compulsory learning environment inductions commonly issued to online learners. Could other sectors learn from this approach? FE 53% 27% 20% HE 66% 21% 13% Online = agree = neutral = disagree Understood what digital skills I needed before starting my course
  21. 21. 36% 32% 31% Involvement in Digital Decision Making 06/07/2017 21 39% 38% 23% ACL & Skills  Only one third of learners agree that they are given the chance to be involved in decisions about digital services:  Highest level of agreement amongst FE learners (44%)  Highest level of disagreement amongst HE learners (33%)  The tracker provides an opportunity for organisations to engage with learners by:  Sharing, analysing and learning from their results  Conversing with student unions/bodies and course representative on digital services  Following-up where required with further research in key areas 44% 37% 19% FE 35% 32% 33% HE Online = agree = neutral = disagree Q10/Q11/Q12. How much do you agree with the following statements? Given the chance to be involved in decisions about digital services
  22. 22. 06/07/2017 22 DigitalTraining, Safety & Support
  23. 23. Access to DigitalTraining & Support 06/07/2017 23 Go to most often for support in learning digital skills (top 3) Q4/Q5. Who best supports you in these kinds of skills? Q13/Q14/Q15. How much do you agree with the following statements? ACL & Skills Lecturers/ tutors Friends & family Online info 47% 27% 20% FE Lecturers/ tutors Friends & family Students 46% 18% 18% HE Online info Students Friends & family 37% 20% 19% Online Online info Friends & family Lecturers/ tutors 46% 20% 14% Differences evident between groups in the key support mechanisms used for learning digital skills:  ACL and Skills (47%) and FE (46%) learners most commonly turn to their tutors for support in learning digital skills  HE (37%) and Online Learners (46%) most commonly turn to online information to learn new digital skills  Fewer than 6% of ACL and Skills or Online learners turned to fellow students as their main source of learning digital skills in comparison with one in five FE or HE Learners  Online learners were the most likely (71%) to agree and FE learners the least likely to agree (64%) that they could access digital training & support from their learning provider whenever they needed it 71% 66% 64% 70% 21% 24% 29% 24% 8% 10% 7% 7% Online HE FE ACL & Skills Can access digital training & support from learning provider whenever they need it agree neutral disagree
  24. 24. 4% 14% 12% 10% Support with Disability/Health Issues 06/07/2017 24Q5/Q6. Do you have a disability or health issue that affects how you study? ACL & Skills FE HE Online % learners who said they have a disability or health issue that affects how they study % learners who have difficulty accessing learner provider info/course content as a result of their disability % learners who have had support to use assistive technologies from their learning provider ACL & Skills 11% 38% FE Learners 11% 23% HE learners 17% 31% Online learners 12% 14%  Fewer Online learners identify themselves as having a disability or health issue that affects their learning compared to other groups:  Further investigation required. If confirmed, this finding could suggest that online learning is failing to attract a group of learners that may benefit greatly from the independence & flexibility this format offers  Low proportions of learners say they have difficulty accessing learner provider information/course content as a result of their disability  The HE learner group self-identified the highest % of disabilities or health issues, but were most likely to say they had difficulty accessing provider information or content (17%) because of their disability
  25. 25. 06/07/2017 25Q14/Q15? How much do you agree with the following statements? I know where to get help from my learning provider if I being bullied or harassed online (% agree) My learning provider expects me to behave respectfully in online spaces (% agree) My learning provider helps me stay safe online (% agree) 76% ACL & Skills FE 81% HE 67% Online 79% Digital Safety and Wellbeing (optional) 70% 68% 58% 68% 84% 86% 91% 86% Results indicate difference between HE and other learner groups in relation to digital safety & wellbeing:  HE learners least likely group to agree (67%) they know where to get help from their learning provider if being bullied or harassed online. FE learners (81%) most likely to agree with this statement  HE learners also least likely to agree (58%) that their learning provider helps them stay safe online. ACL & Skills most likely to agree (70%)  Yet 91% of HE learners agree their learning provider expects them to behave restfully in online spaces, the highest of all groups:  Does this reflect historically lower expectations around provider responsibility & higher student independence within HE?
  26. 26. 06/07/2017 26Q10/Q11/Q12? How much do you agree with the following statements? Q14/Q15. How much do you agree with the following statements? Been told how their personal data is being stored (% agree) My learning provider protects my data privacy (% agree) 56% ACL & Skills FE 47% HE 35% Online 39% Data Protection (optional) 82% 75% 77% 76%  ACL & Skills learners most likely to agree their learning provider protects their data privacy (82%) & they are told how their personal data is being stored (56%)  FE learners are the least likely to agree (75%) their learning provider protects their data privacy  HE learners are the least likely to agree (35%) they are told how their personal data is being stored  Low proportions of all groups agree they are being told how their personal data is being stored. Further work required to understand:  Whether this is an issue for learners? Whether lack of understanding around definition of personal data is skewing the results? Are learners missing provider communications due to a lack of interest? What is the level of trust in providers in this area?
  27. 27. 06/07/2017 27 Digital Skills Beyond the Learning Environment
  28. 28. Behave safely & respectfully online 94% 97% 98% 98% Perception of Digital Skills 06/07/2017 28Q3/Q4.Are you able to…?/ Q4.Can you…? Q13/Q14/Q15. How much do you agree with the following statements?  Learners rate their digital skills highly, although confidences drops in relation to modifying standard settings to suit personal needs:  ACL & Skills learners are less likely to say they can complete all tasks on their own compared to other learner groups  Are learners overrating their abilities/ unaware of their short comings, as in phrase 1 of the pilot and other student user testing?  Across all groups, half or less of learners agree that they are made aware of what skills they need to improve, indicating there is a shortfall in the provision and/or signposting of services to support digital skills and capabilities across all sectors :  FE and ACL & Skills learners are most positive; roughly half of learners agree and only 1/5 disagree with this statement  Comparatively, roughly 40% of Online and HE Learners agree & approximately 30% disagree. This difference could relate to the requirement for HE and online learners to be self-directed and independent in their studies, including in their development of digital skills % complete task on their own 78% 88% 88% 88% 79% 85% 88% 89% 81% 88% 90% 86% 76% 80% 80% 73% Judge online content for its relevance & reliability Create a positive online profile Change privacy settings & manage passwords Modify standard settings to suit my needs 40% 41% 51% 50% 32% 26% 31% 29% 29% 34% 18% 21% Online HE FE ACL & Skills Made aware of any digital skills needed to improve agree neutral disagree
  29. 29. Perceptions of Digital Skills in the Workplace 06/07/2017 29Q10/Q11/Q12. How much do you agree with the following statements? 56% 50% 51% 42% 32% 33% 35% 32% 12% 17% 14% 26% Online HE FE ACL & Skills Course prepares them for the digital workplace Digital skills are important in my chosen career 82% 63% 15% 30% 3% 7% HE FE  The results across learner groups indicate more could be done to prepare learners for the digital workplace:  82% of HE learners agree digital skills will be important in their chosen career, but only 50% agree their course prepares them well for the digital workplace  Lower proportions of FE learners (63%) perceive digital skills to be important in their chosen career, but this remains higher than those agreeing (51%) their course prepares them for the digital workplace  Are learner perceptions of the skills accurate? Since we know that around 90% of all new jobs require good digital skills there must be a question mark over the workplace awareness of these learners and perhaps teaching staff. See: https://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201617/cmsele ct/cmsctech/270/270.pdf = agree = neutral = disagree
  30. 30. 06/07/2017 30 Further Information & Project Contacts
  31. 31. Further Information 06/07/2017 31 For the full report & briefings please visit: https://www.jisc.ac.uk/rd/projects/student-digital-experience- tracker Join the tracker mailing list: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/jisc-digitalstudent-tracker Follow #digitalstudent and @jisc onTwitter To sign-up to take part in the 2018 student digital experience tracker, please visit: https://jisc-beta.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/tracker-signup-2017-18 If you would like further information on the student digital experience tracker project, please contact: Sarah.knight@jisc.ac.uk
  32. 32. Report Contact Jessica Francis Research Manager – Product & Improvement jessica.francis@jisc.ac.uk 0203 815 5571 06/07/2017 32

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