Keeping Webinars
Inclusive
Alistair McNaught: Jisc TechDis
Paul Richardson: Jisc RSC Wales
www.jisctechdis.ac.uk11/03/2014...
So what would YOU do if ……..
• You had a profoundly deaf delegate in your
session?
• You had a moderately visually impaire...
Live example
A live introduction to Birmingham
11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 3
What’s in a name?
• Ham – home
• Ing – tribe
• Beorma – a tribal leader.
• Beorma’s tribe’s home…..
• Beorma-ing-ham
11/03...
What’s in a place?
Geology
• Rocks – building
materials, fuel,
ironworking, pottery.
• Vegetation – hunting
on the heaths ...
What’s in a place?
Natural vegetation
11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 6
What’s in a place?
Natural vegetation
11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 7
11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 8
The quirks of history
Stability and enterprise
De Bermingham family
were Lords of the
Manor for 400 years.
Sought permissi...
The quirks of history
Enterprise and fortune
Tenants had more freedoms than
usual for the time and there were no
restricti...
And so the city grows
11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 11
Elements of accessible
online experiences:
• Advance preparation
• gain foreknowledge
• adapt to delegate needs (eg pre-sc...
On the day – blind
people
Issues:
Listen to presenter or listen to screen reader?
Which is most important?
Accessing visua...
On the day – deaf people
Issues:
What is presenter saying - content?
What is presenter saying – instructions – eg press
vo...
On the day – dyslexic
people
Issues:
Making sense of text dense info?
Fear of poor spelling?
Keeping up with the multiple ...
On the day – motor
impaired people.
Issues:
Keyboard only access to all functions?
Speed of writing and disjointed contrib...
VI – TechDis suggestions
• Personality and privacy check – do they want others to know
and if so what is their preferred e...
Hearing – TechDis
suggestions
• Personality and privacy check – do they want others to know
and if so what is their prefer...
Dyslexia / literacy
suggestions
• Personality and privacy check – do they want others to know and
if so what is their pref...
Dexterity – TechDis
suggestions
• Personality and privacy check – do they want others
to know and if so what is their pref...
Conclusions
• Try to consider the needs of all delegates.
• Accommodations for disabled people may be
welcomed by many oth...
More Information
11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 22
http://moodle.rsc-wales.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=292
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Keeping webinars inclusive - Alistair McNaught and Paul Richardson - Jisc Digital Festival 2014

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Keeping webinars inclusive - Alistair McNaught and Paul Richardson - Jisc Digital Festival 2014

  1. 1. Keeping Webinars Inclusive Alistair McNaught: Jisc TechDis Paul Richardson: Jisc RSC Wales www.jisctechdis.ac.uk11/03/2014 1
  2. 2. So what would YOU do if …….. • You had a profoundly deaf delegate in your session? • You had a moderately visually impaired delegate in your session? • You had a blind delegate in your session? • You had someone who is severely dyslexic in your session?
  3. 3. Live example A live introduction to Birmingham 11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 3
  4. 4. What’s in a name? • Ham – home • Ing – tribe • Beorma – a tribal leader. • Beorma’s tribe’s home….. • Beorma-ing-ham 11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 4
  5. 5. What’s in a place? Geology • Rocks – building materials, fuel, ironworking, pottery. • Vegetation – hunting on the heaths and woods; fishing in the valley streams. • Variety of soils for farming. • Routeways 11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 5
  6. 6. What’s in a place? Natural vegetation 11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 6
  7. 7. What’s in a place? Natural vegetation 11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 7
  8. 8. 11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 8
  9. 9. The quirks of history Stability and enterprise De Bermingham family were Lords of the Manor for 400 years. Sought permission to hold market (1156) and fairs (1250). 11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 9
  10. 10. The quirks of history Enterprise and fortune Tenants had more freedoms than usual for the time and there were no restrictive obstacles to trade. Markets, smithies, potteries. Supplied Roundheads with swords and armour. Reputation for manufacturing blossomed. 11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 10
  11. 11. And so the city grows 11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 11
  12. 12. Elements of accessible online experiences: • Advance preparation • gain foreknowledge • adapt to delegate needs (eg pre-scripting presentational elements) • On the day • implementing whatever adjustments you’ve made. • supporting delegates in optimising their systems • Session follow up • for feedback • To provide post-event resources that may not have been possible on the day – eg summary of discussion threads.
  13. 13. On the day – blind people Issues: Listen to presenter or listen to screen reader? Which is most important? Accessing visual information? Some functionality not accessible? Keeping up with the multiple threads by sound alone? Suggested solutions?
  14. 14. On the day – deaf people Issues: What is presenter saying - content? What is presenter saying – instructions – eg press voting button, annotate whiteboard? Making sense of text dense info? Keeping up with the multiple threads when working in second language? Suggested solutions?
  15. 15. On the day – dyslexic people Issues: Making sense of text dense info? Fear of poor spelling? Keeping up with the multiple threads – speed of reading? articulacy of written responses? Suggested solutions?
  16. 16. On the day – motor impaired people. Issues: Keyboard only access to all functions? Speed of writing and disjointed contributions to multiple threads ? Suggested solutions?
  17. 17. VI – TechDis suggestions • Personality and privacy check – do they want others to know and if so what is their preferred explanation. • Test intended feature use in advance with delegate if possible. • Advise on whether to focus on presentation/discussion or timeliness of either. Silencing screenreader may be required. • Describe key content of all slides. • Build in staging points for facilitator to aurally summarise key threads and invite other contributions. • A VI person could be given permanent “open mike” to request clarification at any time. • Facilitator uses periodic private communication (instant message or phone) to check all is OK.
  18. 18. Hearing – TechDis suggestions • Personality and privacy check – do they want others to know and if so what is their preferred explanation? • Depending on the context, presenter can work from a script sent to the delegate beforehand. Deviations from the script can be flagged the chat by facilitator. • Activity instructions can be added to text chat by facilitator or added to an ‘instruction’ slide. • Use relevant images to support slide text. • Build in staging points for facilitator to summarise key threads in text pane and/or invite questions or comments. • Pause regularly if delivering via a sign language interpreter. • Facilitator uses periodic private messaging to check all is OK
  19. 19. Dyslexia / literacy suggestions • Personality and privacy check – do they want others to know and if so what is their preferred explanation. • Pre-empt spelling issues by clarifying value of contribution over the value of literary flair. • Depending on the context the presenter can send any text dense resources to delegate beforehand. • Use relevant images to support slide text. • Build in staging points for facilitator to summarise key threads aurally and invite other contributions. • Give option of open mike for questions or comments. • Facilitator uses periodic private messaging to check all is OK
  20. 20. Dexterity – TechDis suggestions • Personality and privacy check – do they want others to know and if so what is their preferred explanation. • Depending on the context the presenter can send any resources to delegate beforehand so they can prepare their responses/questions. • Build in staging points for facilitator to summarise key threads aurally (navigation may be trickier without a mouse). • Give option of open mike. • Facilitator uses periodic private messaging to check all is OK
  21. 21. Conclusions • Try to consider the needs of all delegates. • Accommodations for disabled people may be welcomed by many others and usually look and feel like good practice. • If an accommodation is likely to have a detrimental effect on others it is the wrong accommodation. • Any disabled delegate should be given the option of submitting a question/comment immediately after the event for inclusion in the post event notes. People with disabilities can find it difficult to respond quickly to the chaos of text chat.
  22. 22. More Information 11/03/2014 www.jisctechdis.ac.uk 22 http://moodle.rsc-wales.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=292

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