Kinect for Windows
K3DA cheap distance-ed platform       Digital Worlds Institute and  Center for Media Innovation + Research            Univ...
Sound-activated, motion-sensing, 3D camera          Infrared      VGA      IR depth          projector     camera   sensor...
How it senses depthInfrared projector and camera
How it tracks motionKinect tracks 15 body points, primarily the major joints
Creating the avatar
Virtual classrooms
Virtual classrooms
Applications• Students can be “transported” to any location• Remote students with Kinectdevices can  participate in a live...
Fun with VR
Contacts• Dr. AngelosBarmpoutis, UF Digital Worlds  Institute  – angelos@digitalworlds.ufl.edu• David Carlson, UF Center f...
K3DA cheap distance-ed platform       Digital Worlds Institute and  Center for Media Innovation + Research            Univ...
Digital Journalism Education Teach-A-Thon | K3D: A New Distance Education Tool | Journalism Interactive Conference 2013 | ...
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Digital Journalism Education Teach-A-Thon | K3D: A New Distance Education Tool | Journalism Interactive Conference 2013 | journalisminteractive.com/2013/

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DESCRIPTION: K3D: A New Distance Education Tool. Part of Journalism Interactive 2013 conference Teach-A-Thon. Educators were given 5 minutes to talk about curriculum ideas, tools, class assignments and more to help digital journalism educators. Journalisminteractive.com

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  • Hi, everyone, and thank you for being here.This is a Kinect. It’s a sound-activated, motion-sensing, 3D camera developed by Microsoft, originally for the XBOX 360 gaming console. This version which works with Windows computers, was released 53 weeks ago.
  • The Center for Media Innovation + Research is working with the Digital Worlds Institute at theUniversity of Florida to develop an inexpensive distance-education solution utilizing the Kinect device and an open-source software platform.
  • This device costs $215 at Walmart and about the same at Amazon. An academic version is available for about $150 online. As you can see, theKinect has three “eyes.” The one on your left actually is an infrared projector, which sends out a pattern of dots invisible to the naked eye. The middle “eye” is a standard VGA webcam with resolution of 640 by 480 pixels. The lens on the right is an infrared camera.And across the bottom is an array of directionalmicrophones.
  • Looking from behind the Kinect with a special infrared-viewing filter, you can see what the infrared camera sees, the pattern of dots sent out by the projector. It is this “eye” that sees depth, which along with the VGA camera gives the Kinect its 3D capability.
  • Sensors movie.As you can see in this view, here are three images being generated by the Kinect sensors. At the upper left is the view from the VGA camera. At right is the 3D view being generated by the combination of VGA and infrared data. At the lower right is the “Skeleton view,” which the Kinect is extrapolating from the other two images. Let me talk for a minute about that skeleton view.
  • The Kinect is programmed to watch 15 body points, primarily the major joints such as shoulders, elbows and knees, the parts of the body that move most often. This is one of the keys to its application for distance education. We can store a body image, or avatar, on a distant computer. Then, we can animate that avatar in a very lifelike way by sending just the coordinates of those 15 body points. It means that students at remote locations do not need a high-bandwidth Internet connection to experience a 3D view.
  • I can create as many body images as I wish and store them for later use. It’s easy to create them with the Kinect and the K3D software. I simply select the “Avatar Maker” from the menu and stand in front of the camera. You can see my image on the right as if I am standing before a green screen. When I raise my left hand, the camera begins scanning my body image. You can see from the grid on the right that the camera is measuring me. After showing it my body from multiple angles, I raise my right hand to complete the scan.
  • We can use this technology and a set of static images to generate what appears to be a 3D environment. In our case, we’ll call them classrooms. My body image can appear to be in any remote location I choose. This one happens to be a theater in ancient Greece. Again, no big bandwidth pipe is needed because we generate that 3D view from static images. We send the images once to the remote computers and store them there.
  • In this video I’m about to show, you’ll notice that my avatar has no head. I look like Ichabod Crane, the headless horseman. There is a reason for that: The head and mouth don’t move quite enough to track in full-motion 3D. The solution is to crop the image of the head from the VGA camera and place it atop the body, but we’re not quite there yet. Also, you may note that the avatar isn’t perfectly sharp. That saves bandwidth, but it still looks pretty lifelike with the VGA quality talking head on top. Students have control of the view they see. They can move around inside the image to see from the side, the back, above, or whatever.
  • As you can see, once I have the avatar, I can put it anywhere, as long as I have a few still pictures of that place. If I were teaching architecture, I could place my avatar inside the world’s great buildings and point out their salient features to students at diverse locations. If I were a pediatrician, I could use the Kinect and K3D software to scan the body images of children thousands of miles away and diagnose various diseases from the data. Even though the avatar looks a little blurry, the camera makes very accurate measurements which can be extrapolated from the images.
  • The Center for Media Innovation + Research is working with the Digital Worlds Institute at theUniversity of Florida to develop an inexpensive distance-education solution utilizing the Kinect device and an open-source software platform.
  • Digital Journalism Education Teach-A-Thon | K3D: A New Distance Education Tool | Journalism Interactive Conference 2013 | journalisminteractive.com/2013/

    1. 1. Kinect for Windows
    2. 2. K3DA cheap distance-ed platform Digital Worlds Institute and Center for Media Innovation + Research University of Florida
    3. 3. Sound-activated, motion-sensing, 3D camera Infrared VGA IR depth projector camera sensor Microphone array
    4. 4. How it senses depthInfrared projector and camera
    5. 5. How it tracks motionKinect tracks 15 body points, primarily the major joints
    6. 6. Creating the avatar
    7. 7. Virtual classrooms
    8. 8. Virtual classrooms
    9. 9. Applications• Students can be “transported” to any location• Remote students with Kinectdevices can participate in a live class• Sessions can be streamed and/orrecorded• Required bandwidth is minimal• Total cost: About $600 for camera and laptop
    10. 10. Fun with VR
    11. 11. Contacts• Dr. AngelosBarmpoutis, UF Digital Worlds Institute – angelos@digitalworlds.ufl.edu• David Carlson, UF Center for Media Innovation + Research – dave@davidcarlson.org
    12. 12. K3DA cheap distance-ed platform Digital Worlds Institute and Center for Media Innovation + Research University of Florida

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